Eating low-carb, WITHOUT dairy - Page 2

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Eating low-carb, WITHOUT dairy - Page 2


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Old 03-30-2012, 16:34   #11
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(hope you don't mind that I have "stickied" you to the top of this board . . . )

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Old 03-30-2012, 16:43   #12
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Quote:
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(hope you don't mind that I have "stickied" you to the top of this board . . . )
I was hoping you would.

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Old 03-30-2012, 17:00   #13
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Have you tried the coconut manna, that Nutiva sells?

I am curious whether it is any good.

I also use almond milk. If I had to give up or reduce dairy, I would definitely have to eat meat.
I have a jar of the coconut manna by Nutiva sitting on my stove top at the moment. In appearance it looks much like their regular CO. It seems to be solid when room temperatures are cool (as they are now in our region). The texture is sort of like peanut butter, although not that easy to spread. Flavor is definitely 'coconut' and a little bit goes a long way IMO. The "jury" is still out on this product and don't know if I will buy it again. It isn't bad, but just not sure how much I like it either.

My CO, on the other hand, we love! Our store was all sold out of the smaller sizes and only the very largest size was left on the shelf. So I paid over $30 for the large jar, but do not regret it as I have plenty of CO for anything and everything. One of the younger clerks in our market (who has gorgeous skin btw) said she uses CO as a moisturizer, especially in the Winter months. Learned something new that day from her

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Old 04-04-2012, 20:10   #14
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...said she uses CO as a moisturizer, especially in the Winter months. Learned something new that day from her
I keep a 50/50 coconut oil/olive oil mix in the fridge. I use it as a hand moisturizer after washing my hands while cooking. It's safe to be handling food with it on my hands. Nice on chapped lips, too.

AND, it makes a decent spread for crackers and breads, as a substitute for butter or margarine.

You need to heat the coconut oil so it's liquid before stirring into the olive oil. Keeping it in the fridge prevents separation.

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Old 04-04-2012, 20:20   #15
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Default Saturated Fat Source - when you can't eat butter

I have going from using veggetable oils to using beef tallow - rendered beef fat* - as my primary source of saturated fat.

* pork fat is called lard, beef fat is called tallow

I use tallow for frying and to add fat to any dish. I have also used it as a spread on toast, just like butter, although it's an acquired taste.

Beef tallow is probably a lot like butterfat - it comes from the same animal, afterall. When rendered pure, it has little taste, but itastes different from butter. It certainly has the same melting point. Also, it seems to have a moderately high smoke point, which is good for frying.

I also render chicken fat, and use it to "fatten" up a chicken dish, especially when fixing chicken breasts which has next to no fat content.

Beef tallow is EXCELLENT for frying CHICKEN - it really works well. Much better than oils or vegetable shortening. It gives it a great taste.

I don't eat pork bacon, but will add beef tallow to the pan when frying lean turkey bacon.

If you do eat bacon, save the excess fat for use in other dishes.

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Old 04-04-2012, 20:31   #16
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Tallow actually has LESS saturated fat than butterfat. It is mostly monunsaturated, if I recall correctly.

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Old 04-04-2012, 20:38   #17
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Default Rendering fat

I know someone will ask - how to you render fat.

Well, most of you have been doing that all along. When you cook meat and pour off the fat - you have rendered fat. When you put the juices from cooking meat or making soup into the refrigerator so the fat will rise to the top and you can skim it off - that's rendered fat.

You could collect this fat and use it for cooking - it won't be "pure" in that there'll be meat juices in it. When I collect fat this way, I take the cold, solidified fat from the top of the liquid, break it up, and store the pieces in the freezer - and use straight from the bag.

However, a more pure form of fat is rendered by cooking just the fat with no meat so the fat is melted out of the fiberous material. You strain this through a mesh while pouring into a dish. Let it solidify in the refrigerator, break it in pieces, and keep in the refrigerator, or if a lot, put the excess in the freezer.

There are excellent tutorials on the internet to help one learn how to render fat - and some videos. Just do a search and find the way you like best.

There are two basic ways to do this
1) put the fat in water and slow boil for an hour or so. When cooled down, place the pan in the refrigerator. You can then lift the solid fat up from the water.

2) slow cook it on stovetop. You don't have to contend with the water this way.

WHERE TO GET THE FAT

I buy beef fat from Whole Foods - they charge me $1/lb. The reason is that the beef from there has not been given hormons or antibiotics. It is in the fat that the hormons will be concentrated. So for quantity tallow, I go for the better raw ingredients. That's not to say that I don't skim fat when cooking regular grocery store beef, but it is a smaller part of the whole for us.

Chicken fat: we don't like the skin on our chicken. So when I skin the thicken thighs I cut off some of the fat, and put the whole mess in a pan of water and slow boil it to render the fat. It isn't "pure" in that it hasn't been strained, but since I keep it in the freezer, this isn't a storage problem.

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Old 04-04-2012, 20:40   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxl View Post
Tallow actually has LESS saturated fat than butterfat. It is mostly monunsaturated, if I recall correctly.
When I said tallow is a lot like butterfat, I was thinking on its physical properties as related to cooking with it.

I didn't know about the less saturated fat part, but for me, since I can't eat butter, it'll have to do.

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Old 04-04-2012, 21:22   #19
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Okay, foxl, you got me curious.
I went online - this was the first place I looked and it had nutritional breakdown for more foods than you can think of. Also fats.

Data from: Nutrition facts, calories in food, labels, nutritional information and analysis – NutritionData.com

Comparison…
1 oz. of beef tallow / butter / coconut oil

Total fat:................. 28.0g / 15.4g / 28.0g

Saturated fat............ 13.9g / 9.6g / 24.2g
Monosaturated fat.... 11.7g / 4.5g / 1.6g
Polysunsaturated fat... 1.1g / .6g / .5g

Omega 3 fatty acids.. 168mg / 225mg / 0
Omega 6 fatty acids... 868mg / 348mg / 504mg

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Old 04-04-2012, 21:32   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxl View Post
Tallow actually has LESS saturated fat than butterfat. It is mostly monunsaturated, if I recall correctly.
Not "mostly" at all, but a bit less than half is monounsaturated.

It certainly is better than vegetable oils, which is what I was using.

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