Pregnancy

Women who conceive in winter more likely to develop gestational diabetes

by Barbara Hewitt on November 21, 2016

Women whose babies are conceived in winter are more likely to develop gestation diabetes during their pregnancy, according to new research.

A study of more than 60,000 births in South Australia over a five year period is the first population based study of its kind to confirm a seasonal variation in gestational diabetes.

112116-pregnancyThe study led by researchers from the University of Adelaide points out that gestational diabetes is a serious pregnancy complication characterised by inadequate blood sugar control in pregnancy.

Complications of gestational diabetes include excessive birth weight, pre-term birth, low blood sugar, which in extreme cases can lead to seizures in the baby, and developing type 2 diabetes later in life.

‘Our study is the first of its kind to find strong evidence of a relationship between gestational diabetes and the season in which a child is conceived,’ said lead author Dr Petra Verburg from the University of Groningen, who is currently based at the University of Adelaide’s Robinson Research Institute and at the Lyell McEwin Hospital.

The study found that in the five years from 2007 to 2011 the incidence of pregnancies affected by gestational diabetes increased with 4.9% of pregnancies affected in 2007, increasing to 7.2% in 2011.

Overall women who conceived in winter were more likely to develop gestational diabetes during their pregnancy, with 6.6% of pregnancies from winter conceptions affected and women who conceived in summer were less likely to develop gestational diabetes, with 5.4% of summer conceptions affected.

‘The mechanisms that cause gestational diabetes are still not fully understood. Previous studies have suggested that meteorological factors, physical activity, diet and vitamin D are risk factors for gestational diabetes, all of which are impacted by the winter season,’ explained Verburg.

‘Not only should our results be confirmed in other populations, future research should also investigate other factors that vary with season,’ she added.

Research leader and senior author Professor Claire Roberts, from the University’s Robinson Research Institute, pointed out that the results continue to show the broader impacts of the increasing body mass index (BMI) in women of reproductive age.

‘Elevated BMI and low physical activity are risk factors for gestational diabetes, as well as low socio-economic status. These factors are modifiable, and they represent targets for interventions to prevent the rising tide of gestational diabetes,’ he added.

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