The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online

The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online (https://www.diabetesforum.com/forum.php)
-   Diabetes Complications (https://www.diabetesforum.com/diabetes-complications/)
-   -   Hypo Behavior (https://www.diabetesforum.com/diabetes-complications/98671-hypo-behavior.html)

rsfletcher 09-07-2018 19:42

Hypo Behavior
 
Started to feel a complete lack of energy and broke out in to a sweat - pretty sure I was low with a dropping BG level so I tested myself and I was right. I walked down to the local coffee shop and just ate an apple cinnamon tart - never had one before - it was good and hopefully it will increase my BG level quickly.

Now to the thread - when my BGs get low and I'm in in the initial stages of a hypo my behavior doesn't change - I generally get very focused in maintaining consciousness until I raise my BGs.

Some people with hypos don't realize it until they get dangerously low while other diabetics will have a complete behavior modification that is sometimes perceived as the person being drunk or just plain crazy.

So just curious - when your BG levels get low - do you act normal or does everything kind of mentally unravel?

I figure the complication forum was the best place to post it as it is a complication - it complicates my life :smile2:

mbuster 09-07-2018 21:38

Should be an interesting thread.

For me, I'm not sure how I do, I've only been below 60 a couple of times. My acting normal can almost fall into the oxymoron category anyway, similar to the only thing constant is change.

Cricket 09-07-2018 23:37

I don't have lows anymore because of getting off the extra type 2 medications, but the ones I did have were very scary for me.

I remember standing at the icebox, knowing I had to eat something to get my sugar up quickly but my brain not functioning well enough to actually open something to put in my mouth. I used voice on my iPhone to call my daughter who was less than a block away working. She said I sounded "drunk" so she knew exactly what had happened. I couldn't chew the glucose tablets, so she started slowly pour cola in my mouth.

Another, I was in the middle of the grocery store when out of the blue (only irritability) the room started to go dark. I sat down in the middle of the aisle because I knew I was going down. The store manager was there in moments. The only word I could get out of my mouth was "diabetic". He had to open the orange juice for me.

The last one, I had very little (if any) warning. One minute I was walking on the sidewalk and thinking it was too warm, the next I was waking up on the ground. The was the last day I took glipizide. Never again.

Hearts Jounrey 09-08-2018 01:57

This story requires parental guidance and steel nerves. Some graphic descriptions require viewer discretion.

Below are 3 examples in my life of driving with dangerous lows. Bottom line is even if i have raisins in my hand or my lap while sleeping or driving, the task to bring them to my mouth is a bridge too far once my glucose is below 40 to 45. Sometimes the behavior is total incoherence and laughing, loud noises, and a scene from movie Scar Face with Al Pacino

Potential Consequences as Type 1 Diabetic with Hypoglycemic Unawareness with No Warning Signs blood Sugar is very Low

I was diagnosed in 1977 as a type 1 diabetic and developed hypoglycemic unawareness in Dec 1983. To the best of my knowledge, I cannot recall any Dr or medical professional I saw since then (except one time in 2015) who brought up the risks of having hypoglycemic unawareness and driving and the possibility of losing one’s driver’s license. In my mind I certainly came away thinking it was up to the individual with diabetes to figure that out and manage it by using good judgement. As for the laws in the book during the last 40+ years regarding hypos and driving, they are certainly not as numerous, strict or enforced as they are in Canada - UK - Europe. No one ever said that desperadoes and smart sensible laws would be required to pair up and ride along, side by side.

In retrospect, I see how risky and unwise that aura of overcoming whatever demise, challenge or limitation one may face. It is much like a matador daring a bull 50 feet away, going to work with a 102 fever, or tempting fate by using just a bar to walk across a tight rope. We may think we’ve done it many times before flawlessly and without incident, but it only takes one miscalculation or an unexpected event to cause an accident and possibly put other innocent victims in harm’s way

I know of three times I was driving or just got out of the car where I can thank the man or (woman) upstairs that I did not harm myself or others. On March 27th 1985 after driving 15 miles from work to my parking spot below my condo, as soon as I got out of car and walked 10 feet I went down on pavement where cars pass by to enter and exit complex. Paramedics arrived in 10 min when someone called (no cell phones then) and I was revived and taken to ER. At that time I took only NPH not fast acting or even Regular.

The second time was August 2003 and as I was leaving my Dr office on foot, I dropped in hospital/Dr parking lot but was still conscious. What seemed like sleep walking, I stumbled and with the world spinning, I found my car 100 feet away and managed to drive home 7 miles on surface streets. Thank God there were no accidents.

Due to the pancreas transplant I had in 2004 to become insulin independent, I didn’t have another low below 75 for 11 years until June 10 2015 when I required insulin again.

On Nov 15 2017, I was driving home from work 25 miles away and while it always took 50 min to an hour & 10 min to get home, my blood sugar was 100 when I left work with 2 units insulin on board (in my system) from an injection 2 hours previously. This commute though took 2 hours and while I did have 5 boxes of raisins 2 feet away on the seat with my iphone on my lap, I made it within 4 miles from my home before I pulled off freeway and into a parking lot on a busy intersection at night.

With increasing impairment already set in and profusely sweating, I called my spouse, but I didn’t make any sense or give her any helpful info, then I hung up and went into a grand mal seizure. The next thing I remember, fire dept & paramedics had treated me as my shirt was torn, my neck was strained, and I had begun to become aware of what had happened and how close I was in following my 23 yr old cat who just passed away a week earlier. I was told later that while the fire truck was trying to locate me & my Iphone signal in a sea of cars at night, one fireman saw a car and its windshield fogged up in a maze of other cars nearby with dry windshields and that’s how they located me. The perspiration from my body fogged my car window or else my ghost writer would be sharing this post with you today. Since that day last November, I no longer drive with any on-board humalog insulin in my body. I hope this message & its reflection makes a positive difference so others can avoid tempting fate.

BadhabitsOz 09-08-2018 12:56

Lucky, I guess.
 
Most of my hypos are at home so a few jellybeans and a good lie down and I'm right. I don't drive any more but as I am close to my shopping center I do ride a three wheel bicycle, and at the age of 65 I must admit I do look a sight riding through the department stores. One day I felt a hyp[o coming on because of the light headedness and the perfuse sweating. I can predict whats coming next so this particular time it just so happened I had no money on me, not even a card, so I peddled into the nearest shop which just happened to be a bottle shop, lots of booze no jelly beans so on entering the shop I just said "diabetic" help, the girl behiond the counter had a stash of chocolates she kept for her enjoyment behind the counter. She quickly gave me a chair and a box of chocolates and said :go for it" which I did and a much more destructive situation was saved by a lovely stranger and half a box of her favourite chocolates. I replaced them the next day and thanked her for saving me.:vs_shocked:

oldguy 09-08-2018 14:26

I had my only hypo experience this week one hour after having dinner at elevation burger. I had the paleo burger with water. I got home, then felt dizzy with very rapid pulse. Tested BG at 67. I had a mini fruit popsicle and was fine. So far all I've learned from it is that the paleo burger is an excellent low carb meal. I only take metformin for DB and was told that wouldn't happen.

Squawkx 09-08-2018 19:05

Quote:

Originally Posted by rsfletcher (Post 1310257)
Started to feel a complete lack of energy and broke out in to a sweat - pretty sure I was low with a dropping BG level so I tested myself and I was right. I walked down to the local coffee shop and just ate an apple cinnamon tart - never had one before - it was good and hopefully it will increase my BG level quickly.

Now to the thread - when my BGs get low and I'm in in the initial stages of a hypo my behavior doesn't change - I generally get very focused in maintaining consciousness until I raise my BGs.

Some people with hypos don't realize it until they get dangerously low while other diabetics will have a complete behavior modification that is sometimes perceived as the person being drunk or just plain crazy.

So just curious - when your BG levels get low - do you act normal or does everything kind of mentally unravel?

I figure the complication forum was the best place to post it as it is a complication - it complicates my life :smile2:

The more that I sink into a hypo state, the more unglued that I become; I sink into a stupor, and my IQ probably drops to 70.
I don't really know what I am doing, and I move by instinct, when my BG gets to 50 or so.
And it has gotten that low recently, and it is a terror, it is scary. And yes, I would describe it as being crazy; and with a warped and impaired judgement. I have nearly dropped in my tracks because of hypoglycemia, a number of times.

BadhabitsOz 09-08-2018 19:38

Quote:

Originally Posted by Squawkx (Post 1310299)
The more that I sink into a hypo state, the more unglued that I become; I sink into a stupor, and my IQ probably drops to 70.
I don't really know what I am doing, and I move by instinct, when my BG gets to 50 or so.
And it has gotten that low recently, and it is a terror, it is scary. And yes, I would describe it as being crazy; and with a warped and impaired judgement. I have nearly dropped in my tracks because of hypoglycemia, a number of times.

" Mate, always, but always when you go out side the front door take a small packet of jelly beans or similar easily chew-able and quickly digested candies with you. It's amazing how just doing that helps with the confidence also, you know you have that secret weapon with you in an emergency. Also if you forget to take them a bottle of coke or pepsi will do the trick too "

Squawkx 09-11-2018 21:15

Quote:

Originally Posted by BadhabitsOz (Post 1310303)
" Mate, always, but always when you go out side the front door take a small packet of jelly beans or similar easily chew-able and quickly digested candies with you. It's amazing how just doing that helps with the confidence also, you know you have that secret weapon with you in an emergency. Also if you forget to take them a bottle of coke or pepsi will do the trick too "

When I screw things up I screw them up good: and that is my usual way of setting myself up for a BS crash.
I want to be what I was before, so I typically ignore some painful realities; which is, I am not what I was, and I can die form hypoglycemia.

I want to go out and get to it, so I do; but most of the time I have a medicine bottle of sugar with me. But, there are times that I don't, and I push myself too hard anyway.


I get it mentally, but I don't want to admit that I have been defeated. But, I have been; and if I die trying, it will be my fault.
I try my best, but that is scant protection, and it ain't good enough for the current crisis. I know that, but I do stupid stuff anyway.

PS: if this sounds like a contrite ,"coming to my senses" breakthrough moment, it isn't. I don't think that I have good sense anymore. I am not self-destructive, I am merely pissed off that I have diabetes, and it has defeated me.

itissteve 09-11-2018 22:00

Quote:

Originally Posted by Squawkx (Post 1310461)
PS: if this sounds like a contrite ,"coming to my senses" breakthrough moment, it isn't. I don't think that I have good sense anymore. I am not self-destructive, I am merely pissed off that I have diabetes, and it has defeated me.

Squawx, I've been here since you've joined the forum. In that time, I've seen you post some truly good BG numbers (relative to where you were when you started) and display integrity and discipline in testing your BG, monitoring meds, etc.

I absolutely understand being pissed off about having diabetes (is there anyone here who wants to have it?). But I don't believe it has defeated you. You are standing up to it and managing it. It may take more time and energy than you want to give it, but you are managing it. Give yourself credit for that and keep fighting the good fight.


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:22.

Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.