5:2 diet

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5:2 diet


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Old 07-28-2013, 23:35   #1
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Default 5:2 diet

I saw someone on here was on this diet and lost 10 pounds.
Is it for folks with Type 2?

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Old 07-29-2013, 00:17   #2
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I wouldn't advise it for diabetics. Besides advocating two days of extremely low caloric intake each week, it suggests eating anything we want the other five days, apart from the fact that it seems to support the low-fat WoE. As we diabetics well know, eating anything we want is a recipe for disaster, and we also know that fats are good for us - they provide fuel for energy.




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Old 08-17-2013, 15:29   #3
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I'm giving it a try. Note that I have not been diagnosed, I am pre-diabetic (not full-blown) and I'm not on any medication, so I can't recommend it carte blanche. See your doctor.

My weight loss is slow, but steady -- about a pound per fasting week, assuming I fast twice that week. I'm focusing on other health aspects of fasting, so although losing weight would be awesome, if it doesn't happen I'll keep it up for a while anyway.

Of course I take my BS into consideration when following the "eat anything you want" instructions for the non-fasting days. I find that the morning after a fast my DP is reduced. Keep in mind, I'm pre-diabetic, so my morning bs is not very high to begin with -- usually around 103-106. Fasting often brings it under 100.

I had a great deal of concern about this diet, about hunger and the possibility of low bs. Hunger is present on and off and in no way overwhelming, and I've not have low bs yet. Every day that I fast I'm prepared to stop the fast at any point if I feel it necessary or if it becomes arduous (neither of which has happened yet), and I have skipped fasts if it didn't seem right to me.

I'm always surprised when I wake up the morning after a fast and I'm not hungry. I do notice a slight uptick in calorie intake the day after a fast, but it is slight.

Fasting is making me much more aware of the foods I eat during non-fasting days and how I feel after eating them. Although I'm not actively lowering my calorie count on non-fasting days, I find myself satisfied with less food, and I find that I am much more aware when I reach the satisfaction stage. I seem to become full sooner. And I'm much more aware of my "automatic" eating -- i.e., grabbing a handful of nuts when I'm not hungry, just because they're there.

I'm pleased with this WOE, and I'll probably continue it for a while. BUT I am a person who experiments with my diet frequently, and I take full responsibility for it for myself. I cannot recommend it for anyone but myself -- see your doctor and, if you choose to give it a try, make sure your doctor knows and is paying attention.

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Old 08-17-2013, 15:44   #4
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Intermittent fasting is definitely a good thing health-wise. There is no danger of hypoglycemia from fasting, especially for a diabetic or pre-diabetic. However, as you progress from pre-diabetes to diabetes most likely more than this will be required to maintain health, specifically limiting foods which produce glucose: carbs and proteins.

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Old 08-17-2013, 16:16   #5
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I've gotten quite interested in diabetics who do intermittent fasting in conjunction with a strict LCHF diet when not fasting. I was always told that as a diabetic eating three meals a day was very important, much more critical than for non-diabetics. But now I'm wondering how good that advice was, and if maybe some intermittent fasting would have some positive effects for diabetics who already have good control, and if so what those effects would be. I'm personally not interested in it for it's potential weight loss aspects. I think I have that licked just with the LCHF diet and exercise routine I have. So strictly wondering what it might do for BG numbers, DP, etc.

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Old 08-17-2013, 17:15   #6
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What do you do for this fasting and for how long?


Last edited by moon; 08-17-2013 at 18:46. Reason: deleted long quote
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Old 08-17-2013, 17:39   #7
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There's a book out called Fast Diet by Dr. Michael Mosley that explains it very well (in fact, he's the one who designed it). For two non-consecutive days a week (from the time you get up until the time you get up the following day) you eat 500 calories if you're a woman, and 600 if you're a man. You can split them up any way you like -- all at once, or throughout the day. The rest of the time you "eat whatever you like" which for me is my normal lc diet. That is the entire diet. Being adapted to low carb makes it easier, and eating much of your calorie allotment on fast days as protein makes it easier too.

I don't believe for a minute that his will cure my diabetes. But I am losing a bit of weight (very slowly, but still...) and I am very interested in other health benefits attributed to fasting.

How long? I'm gonna give it a few months, then decide what to do from there. It's not arduous, and because it's only 2 days a week it feels like it is easier to do than other weight loss diets that you have to pay attention to every single day.

As to which days you pick, it doesn't matter as long as they're not consecutive. The great part is if something comes up on a day you planned to fast, you just pick another day.

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Old 08-17-2013, 18:10   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjsunnyday View Post
There's a book out called Fast Diet by Dr. Michael Mosley that explains it very well (in fact, he's the one who designed it). For two non-consecutive days a week (from the time you get up until the time you get up the following day) you eat 500 calories if you're a woman, and 600 if you're a man. You can split them up any way you like -- all at once, or throughout the day. The rest of the time you "eat whatever you like" which for me is my normal lc diet. That is the entire diet. Being adapted to low carb makes it easier, and eating much of your calorie allotment on fast days as protein makes it easier too.

I don't believe for a minute that his will cure my diabetes. But I am losing a bit of weight (very slowly, but still...) and I am very interested in other health benefits attributed to fasting.

How long? I'm gonna give it a few months, then decide what to do from there. It's not arduous, and because it's only 2 days a week it feels like it is easier to do than other weight loss diets that you have to pay attention to every single day.

As to which days you pick, it doesn't matter as long as they're not consecutive. The great part is if something comes up on a day you planned to fast, you just pick another day.
That's very interesting. Thanks did the info and I think I still look up the book on my kindle and see if dh may be interested too.

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Old 08-17-2013, 19:29   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron1963 View Post
I've gotten quite interested in diabetics who do intermittent fasting in conjunction with a strict LCHF diet when not fasting. I was always told that as a diabetic eating three meals a day was very important, much more critical than for non-diabetics. But now I'm wondering how good that advice was, and if maybe some intermittent fasting would have some positive effects for diabetics who already have good control, and if so what those effects would be. I'm personally not interested in it for it's potential weight loss aspects. I think I have that licked just with the LCHF diet and exercise routine I have. So strictly wondering what it might do for BG numbers, DP, etc.
I believe three meals a day or three meals plus two snacks or even more would be important to hypoglycemics, but not diabetics. I asked my doctor (who is an endo) once about this emphasis on three meals and snacks. He said this was just a mental leftover from when most treatment consists of insulin and/or glucose-lowering medications and that barring those, there is no need for diabetics to eat so often if they are not so inclined.

I've seen lots of other evidence that this is actually an unhealthy habit which in recent times no doubt has been aggravated by the low-fat high-glucose diet (which makes you feel the NEED to eat very often). The reason being that when you eat so often your insulin never has a chance to drop as low as it should through the whole day. The level of insulin which allows fat metabolism is very, very low. Just finishing off the glucose from a meal is not enough. A longer period of time is needed for insulin to reach those ideal levels. This is one of the main reasons why intermittent fasting is beneficial.

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66 Years
DX: 9/2009 A1C=10.7
A1C 2/2010: 6.7 (DX + 4 months)
A1C 5/2010: 6.0 (DX + 8 months)
A1C 8/2010: 5.7 (DX + 11 months)
A1C 11/2010: 5.1 (DX + 14 months)
A1C 9/2011: 5.6 (DX + 2 years)
A1C 7/2012: 5.5 (DX + 2 years 10 months)
A1C 1/2019: 5.5
Diet: Approximately C:10;P:15;F:75 (as % calories)
Exercise: Not much. Stairs at home & work.
NO MEDS, No Highs, No Lows
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Old 08-18-2013, 02:45   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smorgan View Post
The reason being that when you eat so often your insulin never has a chance to drop as low as it should through the whole day. The level of insulin which allows fat metabolism is very, very low. Just finishing off the glucose from a meal is not enough. A longer period of time is needed for insulin to reach those ideal levels. This is one of the main reasons why intermittent fasting is beneficial.
Thanks for that reply. I guess I'm still confused about intermittent fasting and how it relates to protein need and for those trying to remain in ketosis. If you go on a one-day fast of not eating anything, you won't be getting any protein. Is that a bad idea? I've heard you should get a minimum of protein. And what about the ketogenic ratio you mentioned elsewhere? If you ate nothing all day, the formula comes out to 0/0, which is undefined (you cannot calculate anything divided by 0). If you even have a completely trivial amount of carbs and no protein or fat, the ratio computes to 0, because 0 divided by anything is 0. If you ate just fat, and not protein or carbs, even if the amount of fat was totally trivial, the calculation comes to 9.0. So most definitely I don't see how the ketogenic ratio is useful when talking about no intake whatsoever, or some trivial amounts. I suppose it isn't really useful until you get above some certain base amount. So anyways, my point is that if someone is trying to stay in ketosis, what do you do about fasting days, where you have conflicting goals of getting enough protein, and maintaining KR. It seems they are impossible goals to meet without eating a lot of fat, which then is not really fasting, is it? And if the fasting is all day, and a complete fasting, then it's impossible to meet either protein or KR goals.

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