Eating Healthy can be very expensive!!

Go Back   The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online > Diabetes Forum Community > Diabetes Diet and Nutrition

Diabetes Diet and Nutrition A healthy, well balanced, nutritious diet which factors in Diabetes can be crucial for the long term management of Diabetes. Use this section to discuss your diet, what you would like to try, swap recipes and more.


Like Tree46Likes

Eating Healthy can be very expensive!!


Closed Thread
 
Shared Thread Thread Tools
Old 11-21-2014, 23:07   #1
Active Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 30

Member Type
Type 2
Diagnosed in 2009

9 likes received
14 likes given
Default Eating Healthy can be very expensive!!

I went shopping for new food staples today, the "good for you" foods, and oh my are they expensive!! I bought the large bag of Splenda, some coconut oil, coconut flour, almond flour, almond milk and of course improved regular food items that we use daily. Talk about sticker shock, but I'm in it to win it, so here I go on my new journey in "eating to my meter." I've got a great deal to learn!

macksvicky likes this.
Mtnview is offline  
Old 11-21-2014, 23:35   #2
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: California, USA
Posts: 563

Member Type
Type Pre
Diagnosed in 1999

891 likes received
72 likes given
Default

The saying is "Pay the farmer now or the doctor later."

It's true that this stuff costs a lot, but what we are no longer buying more than makes up for it. No breakfast cereals, no chips, no cookies, no granola bars, no pudding cups, no 10 lb bags of sugar, no non-dairy "creamers", no pasta, no bread, no frozen meals, etc.

We save even more by not eating out. I buy in bulk when I can (Costco has great prices on some of my staples like coconut oil, nuts and seeds, sardines packed in olive oil, coffee and tea), which helps too. Trader Joe's has great prices on smaller quantities. A local health food store will give me a case discount on canned coconut milk. And bulk bins at WF and other health oriented stores are your friend--much cheaper than the packaged stuff.

I don't buy nut flours or sweeteners very often--I was very dependent on treats in the beginning, but now not so much. My husband bought the organic broccoli at Trader Joe's instead of the regular. Instead of lots of leftover broccoli, we scarfed it up (with lots of butter!). It tasted --so good! Industrially farmed broccoli has very little flavor. It costs 80 cents more a bunch--but there's less waste, more satisfaction with the meal so we don't look for more things to eat after the meal is done. Food tastes so much better, it's so much more satisfying, that I don't spend all day grazing and I don't have to stock the pantry to bursting with packaged foods.

Shanny, Patdart, VeeJay and 4 others like this.
Janknitz is offline  
Old 11-22-2014, 00:10   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 24,394

Member Type
Type 2
Diagnosed in 2009

23930 likes received
32255 likes given
Default

Jan makes a salient point and the same has been my experience. We are on a pretty tight budget, so I watch for sales and then buy as much as I can when an item is on sale. Since we aren't buying processed foods or anything with grains, all that money goes to our low-carb choices.

And the other development is that we don't eat as much volume as before. The food we eat is nourishing our bodies instead of being crapped out as waste - and we aren't hungry all the time like before. I suspect if you stick to the plan, you'll find the same results.



Shanny is offline  
 
Old 11-22-2014, 00:39   #4
Active Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 30

Member Type
Type 2
Diagnosed in 2009

9 likes received
14 likes given
Default

Thanks for the suggestions. It's going to take me a little bit to get over my old love of baked goods, I was a baker- bread maker and feeling kind of lost. Feel free to share a few tried and tried good muffin or cake recipes. I feel I will need a go to now and then or I'll fall off the wagon..

Mtnview is offline  
Old 11-22-2014, 01:45   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 24,394

Member Type
Type 2
Diagnosed in 2009

23930 likes received
32255 likes given
Default

I too, was a baker. Many of us were. Now we bake with nut flours instead of grain flours.



Shanny is offline  
Old 11-22-2014, 03:59   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: US
Posts: 207

Member Type
Type 1
Diagnosed in 2014

210 likes received
53 likes given
Default

Depends on the definition of what is "healthy."

My local farmer's markets double food stamps through a local "beans and greens" program. This includes ALL food items.

I shop at Aldi on occasion. You may have a local similar market.

HyVee and other businesses have bulk bins. Try warehouses too. I thought Costco might be a waste for me, as i live on my own, but now go once per
month for stocking up.

I live in an urban environment. Pay $30 per year for a 25x25 plot that includes water and 10 packs of seeds and seedling plant discounts through a community garden that doesn't have income restrictions. I love it - fresh food, exercise and low cost. You could also look into buying bulk meat or bulk items from a farmer or co-op.

Just ideas. God bless.

Vhm1 is offline  
Old 11-22-2014, 04:06   #7
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: California, USA
Posts: 563

Member Type
Type Pre
Diagnosed in 1999

891 likes received
72 likes given
Default

Another baker here. The year before I went LCHF (or die) I made ALL my family's bread, including sourdough English muffins, bagels, etc. I still love playing with the dough, but I don't eat it anymore and can't bring myself to bake much for the family because I feel like I'm poisoning them!

Janknitz is offline  
Old 11-22-2014, 09:47   #8
Senior Member
 
gotsomeold's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: US - GA and SC
Posts: 2,584

Member Type
Type Pre
Diagnosed in 2013

4673 likes received
4863 likes given
Default

The club stores are very useful for bulk items. Talk to your various groceries/butchers about when they deep discount meat & veggies ('last day' sales can be surprising - I have gotten filet mignon for pennies on the original dollar a few times).

And I encourage you to run internet searches like 'recipe low carb gluten free bread' - be creative with the search criteria and follow links. I am not much of a baker, but over time I have run across some very interesting recipes.

macksvicky likes this.
__________________
- Nancy

wf, 63yo, 5'4", 110 lbs
LCHF diet-controlled T2
DXd myself with PP BG over 270
DX 12/13 with A1C 5.9
8/26/14 HbA1c 5.5
avg BG: 90 - 95 before meals, 100 - 110 one hour PP, 95 2 hours PP
gotsomeold is offline  
Old 11-22-2014, 10:46   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: California, USA
Posts: 3,076

Member Type
Type 2
Diagnosed in 2009

4566 likes received
542 likes given
Default

I don't find it expensive. It's mostly the exotic things like almond flour which are pricey. Breakfast cereals contain 10 or 15 cents worth of grain and sugar and sell for $4. Most of the outrageous value-added is all in processed carbohydrate foods.

REAL foods which work for LC/HF are some of the best values around. Eggs are a fantastic source of nutrition and very cheap. Fatty cuts of meat are best for this diet and conveniently are the cheapest cuts. Heavy cream can be a little pricey if you buy it at boutique style "health food" stores, but you can go to restaurant supply stores and get "manufacturing cream" for under $6 for a half gallon!

Patdart, gotsomeold and macksvicky like this.
__________________
Salim Morgan, T2
66 Years
DX: 9/2009 A1C=10.7
A1C 2/2010: 6.7 (DX + 4 months)
A1C 5/2010: 6.0 (DX + 8 months)
A1C 8/2010: 5.7 (DX + 11 months)
A1C 11/2010: 5.1 (DX + 14 months)
A1C 9/2011: 5.6 (DX + 2 years)
A1C 7/2012: 5.5 (DX + 2 years 10 months)
A1C 1/2019: 5.5
Diet: Approximately C:10;P:15;F:75 (as % calories)
Exercise: Not much. Stairs at home & work.
NO MEDS, No Highs, No Lows
Grandkids: 22
smorgan is offline  
Old 11-22-2014, 12:20   #10
Senior Member
 
Shalynne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: San Francisco Bay Area, CA, USA
Posts: 5,399

Member Type
Type 2
Diagnosed in 2011 (on insulin)

6972 likes received
5382 likes given
Default

The learning process is the most expensive part. First, one must toss or ignore items already stocked.

Then ... one must learn what to stock. At this step, many of us make costly mistakes. If we are focused and persistent, his is a temporary setback.

With time, we do learn what foods work for us. We also learn how to find items on sale, or in discount markets.

__________________
DX'd April Fool's Day, 2011 - T2
Female, 58, 5'7", 150 lbs.
A1C 13.5 -> 6.7 ->5.4 (1/31/14)
MEDS:
Humulin-N (basal) - Humalog (rapid bolus)
MAGIC POTIONS:
Biotin --10,000mcg (for hair health)
B-complex
One-A-Day Women's 50+ Advantage
KyoDophilus (pro-biotic)
LIFE SUPPORT:
Black Coffee - Unsweetened Iced Tea
Low-Carb, High-Fat Convert
Shalynne is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Eating low carb gets expensive :( kyteflyer Diabetes Diet and Nutrition 17 09-30-2014 02:52
Healthy brains by eating brains donnaB Diabetes Diet and Nutrition 13 05-03-2014 08:08
Eating Healthy $$$$$ NJ Steve Diabetes Diet and Nutrition 8 03-02-2012 20:47
Sorry but giving your child a healthy school lunch is just too expensive.... aimster1mo Diabetes Forum Lounge 11 11-17-2011 06:40
Eating Healthy RANT diabetes86 New Member Introductions 30 09-26-2010 20:25

LEGAL NOTICE
By using this Website, you agree to abide by our Terms and Conditions (the "Terms"). This notice does not replace our Terms, which you must read in full as they contain important information. You must not post any defamatory, unlawful or undesirable content, or any content copied from a third party, on the Website. You must not copy material from the Website except in accordance with the Terms. This Website gives users an opportunity to share information only and is not intended to contain any advice which you should rely upon. It does not replace the need to take professional or other advice. We have no liability to you or any other person in respect of any content on this Website.


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:10.




Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2021 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2021 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.