Low carb may protect from breast cancer

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Low carb may protect from breast cancer


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Old 12-09-2011, 12:00   #1
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Default Low carb may protect from breast cancer

Another gem courtesy of Dr Andreas Eenfeldt - The Diet Doctor...


Intermittent, Low-Carbohydrate Diets More Successful Than Standard Dieting, Present Possible Intervention for Breast Cancer Prevention

Quote:
  • Intermittent, low-carbohydrate diets were superior in lowering blood levels of insulin, which can lead to cancer.
  • Low-carbohydrate diet two days per week resulted in greater weight loss than standard daily dieting.

SAN ANTONIO — An intermittent, low-carbohydrate diet was superior to a standard, daily calorie-restricted diet for reducing weight and lowering blood levels of insulin, a cancer-promoting hormone, according to recent findings.

Researchers at Genesis Prevention Center at University Hospital in South Manchester, England, found that restricting carbohydrates two days per week may be a better dietary approach than a standard, daily calorie-restricted diet for preventing breast cancer and other diseases, but they said further study is needed.

Weight loss and reduced insulin levels are required for breast cancer prevention, but [these levels] are difficult to achieve and maintain with conventional dietary approaches,” said Michelle Harvie, Ph.D., SRD, a research dietician at the Genesis Prevention Center, who presented the findings at the 2011 CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 6-10, 2011.

Harvie and her colleagues compared three diets during four months for effects on weight loss and blood markers of breast cancer risk among 115 women with a family history of breast cancer. They randomly assigned patients to one of the following diets: a calorie-restricted, low-carbohydrate diet for two days per week; an “ad lib” low-carbohydrate diet in which patients were permitted to eat unlimited protein and healthy fats, such as lean meats, olives and nuts, also for two days per week; and a standard, calorie-restricted daily Mediterranean diet for seven days per week.

Data revealed that both intermittent, low-carbohydrate diets were superior to the standard, daily Mediterranean diet in reducing weight, body fat and insulin resistance. Mean reduction in weight and body fat was roughly 4 kilograms (about 9 pounds) with the intermittent approaches compared with 2.4 kilograms (about 5 pounds) with the standard dietary approach. Insulin resistance reduced by 22 percent with the restricted low-carbohydrate diet and by 14 percent with the “ad lib” low-carbohydrate diet compared with 4 percent with the standard Mediterranean diet.

“It is interesting that the diet that only restricts carbohydrates but allows protein and fats is as effective as the calorie-restricted, low-carbohydrate diet,” Harvie said.

She and her colleagues plan to further study carbohydrate intake and breast cancer. This study was funded by the Genesis Breast Cancer Prevention Appeal (www.genesisuk.org)

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Old 12-09-2011, 12:02   #2
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and again...

Starch Intake May Influence Risk for Breast Cancer Recurrence

Quote:
  • Increased carbohydrate intake was associated with a higher rate of breast cancer recurrence.
  • Changes in starch intake comprised 48 percent of changes in carbohydrate intake.
  • Dietary modifications targeting starch intake warrant further research.

SAN ANTONIO — Researchers have linked increased starch intake to a greater risk for breast cancer recurrence, according to results presented at the 2011 CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 6-10, 2011.

“The results show that it’s not just overall carbohydrates, but particularly starch,” said Jennifer A. Emond, M.S., a public health doctoral student at the University of California, San Diego. “Women who increased their starch intake over one year were at a much likelier risk for recurring.”

Researchers conducted a subset analysis of 2,651 women who participated in the Women’s Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) Dietary Intervention Trial, a plant-based intervention trial that enrolled about 3,088 survivors of breast cancer. WHEL researchers studied breast cancer recurrence and followed the participants for an average of seven years.

The subset analysis involved an examination of how changes in carbohydrate intake influenced breast cancer recurrence. “The WHEL dietary trial, even though it focused on fruits and vegetables, fiber and fat, didn’t really have a specific carbohydrate goal,” Emond said.

She and her colleagues obtained carbohydrate intake information from multiple 24-hour dietary recalls at baseline and at one year. In an annual phone interview, participants reported everything they had eaten during the last 24 hours.

At baseline, carbohydrate intake was 233 grams per day. Results showed that women whose cancer recurred had a mean increase in carbohydrate intake of 2.3 grams per day during the first year, while women whose cancer did not recur reported a mean decrease of 2.7 grams per day during the first year.

Starches were particularly important, Emond said. Changes in starch intake accounted for 48 percent of the change in carbohydrate intake. Mean change in starch intake during the first year was –4.1 grams per day among women whose cancer recurred vs. –8.7 grams per day among women whose cancer did not recur.

When change in starch intake during one year was grouped into quartiles of change, the rate of an additional breast cancer event was 9.7 percent among women who decreased their starch intake the most during one year, compared with an event rate of 14.2 percent among women who increased their starch intake the most during one year.

The change in starch intake was “independent of dietary changes that happened in the intervention arm,” Emond said. “It is independent of more global changes in diet quality.”

After stratifying patients by tumor grade, Emond and colleagues found that the increased risk was limited to women with lower-grade tumors.

These results indicate a need for more research on dietary recommendations that consider limited starch intake among women with breast cancer.

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Old 12-09-2011, 12:15   #3
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For this second study (observational, while the first was a gold-standard RCT) I do wonder how they defined "starches"?

My own particular bug-bear are refined and commonly used starches like Maltodextrin which although not classed as a Sugar* and as such does not have listed on a nutritional label (you need to go hunting the ingredients list), yet it still breaks down just as quickly to Glucose -- so beware of foods promising "sugar free".

*on nutritional labels the "sugar" only refers to simple monosaccharides like glucose and fructose, or disaccharides like sucrose (glucose + fructose) or lactose (glucose + galactose). The polysaccharide "starches" are the missing bit when you figure out that the Total Carbs does not equal the Sugar + Fibre

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Old 12-09-2011, 13:19   #4
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Since I've been doing low carb I have been reading a lot of connection between a high carb diet and all sorts of cancers. I guess cancer thrives on glucose. Just another reason to keep the carbs low.

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Old 12-09-2011, 17:58   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwags View Post
Since I've been doing low carb I have been reading a lot of connection between a high carb diet and all sorts of cancers. I guess cancer thrives on glucose. Just another reason to keep the carbs low.
After my mom passed from a rather aggresive cancer, I did a lot of research into it.

All cells in our body thrive on glucose... However, when you add insulin into the mix, there seems to be further problems...

I'm of the belief now that insulin (not just glucose or other sugars), is actually one of the big problems in cancer-growth. Most of us that have metabolic syndrome and/or Type-II diabetes also have hyperinsulinemia (excess insulin in our systems) due to insulin-resistance... (Unless we've adopted a low-carb lifestyle to reduce insulin excretion.)

Much research has now shown that both insulin and IGF-1 (Insulin-like Growth Factor) are known to enhance tumor-cell proliferation, and IGF-1 is now being shown to actually interfere with cancer therapies.

It's also being thought and recent evidence supports the idea that the chronic inflammatory state accompanying metabolic syndrome may also contribute to tumor growth.

As such it only makes sense that low-carb would lead to reduced cancer growth and better outcomes.

I'd like to see the "30 bananas a day" guy refute that. Gosh I want to smack him upside the head... if you know who I mean.

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Old 12-09-2011, 18:53   #6
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Why did they only test an "intermittent" LC diet? Nice that they [FINALLY] noticed the benefits of LC, but they would be much greater on a full-time LC WOE.

All cancers love glucose. They also tend not to be insulin resistant. So, clearly, the high glucose and the high insulin required due to insulin resistance would clearly feed the cancer cells.

A full-time ketogenic diet would be much better, since cancer cells interestingly canot switch to ketones, they need glucose. There have been some clinical trials using keto diets to treat brain cancer and early results look good.

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Old 12-09-2011, 20:02   #7
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Since switching to very low carb I have noticed a dramatic reduction in pain from my endometrial tumors (not all were successfully removed). Once I learned about IGF it made a ton more sense. Evidently pretty much all types of endothelial growths/tumors are associated with hyperinsulinemia and IGF.

I'm hoping that my ticket to getting off of hormone therapy is this diet. Taking hormones is no fun and screws up everything from mood to gut flora, etc.

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Old 12-21-2011, 15:17   #8
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Why if I have a corotid artery my doc. adviced me to go low fat and low carb. I personally don't think there is such a thing.So what do I do ??

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Old 12-27-2011, 06:47   #9
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Thanks for sharing such a great information. It is really very informative and useful for me. Is there any connection of breast cancer with diabetes or not?

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Old 12-27-2011, 14:18   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daytona View Post
Since switching to very low carb I have noticed a dramatic reduction in pain from my endometrial tumors (not all were successfully removed). Once I learned about IGF it made a ton more sense. Evidently pretty much all types of endothelial growths/tumors are associated with hyperinsulinemia and IGF.

I'm hoping that my ticket to getting off of hormone therapy is this diet. Taking hormones is no fun and screws up everything from mood to gut flora, etc.
I had multiple, multiple uterine fibroids, found in the same appt as my Hashimoto's. Had surgery to remove the biggest 3 -- one was 13 cm! Yes IGF is the link. Nobody warned me about diabetes, though.

Now I am post-meno and hopeful of avoiding recurrence. However my mom had post-meno breast cancer (but was following a low-fat, starch-rich diet), so no HRT for me!

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