The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online

The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online (https://www.diabetesforum.com/forum.php)
-   Diabetes Diet and Nutrition (https://www.diabetesforum.com/diabetes-diet-nutrition/)
-   -   Why Eating Meat Is Good For You (https://www.diabetesforum.com/diabetes-diet-nutrition/98757-why-eating-meat-good-you.html)

mbuster 10-08-2018 14:11

Why Eating Meat Is Good For You
 
Why Eating meat is good for you.. Lots of links to more info.

xring 10-08-2018 22:04

If medical experts all agreed on this issue, there wouldn't be any debate. The fact that they don't agree on what foods are good for us indicates that no one really knows whether plant foods or animal foods are healthier. That makes it a matter of opinion, rather than fact.
People tend to recommend whatever type of diet they like, so their opinions are usually based on their personal preferences, & that includes doctors & nutritionists.

mbuster 10-08-2018 23:52

I think there is plenty of factual science offered up in the article and more in the links, if you read them. My take, yes my opinion, looking at the FACTS is that both plant and animal food sources have many benefits and a few drawbacks. Humans eating carnivore or herbivore exclusively are not going to get all required nutrients, vitamins, minerals, etc., that are required. Being an omnivore does not automatically mean they will not be deficient in something, but they have the best shot of not having a deficiency.

I believe the article mentions several times that not one diet, including keto is right for everyone.

I agree that doctors and nutritionists are biased in their recommendations, not so much because of what they like, but because of what they have been taught was good and bad. Brainwashed I think is a better choice of words than taught though. If they would actually check the FACTS and see what the real science says, they would question what is currently being recommended. Based on studies comparing diets, it should be obvious that the current SAD is one of the worst ways of eating ever recommended.

Medicine is much like politics, beliefs are built around greed and can be bought by anyone willing to pay a boat load of money for what they want.

smorgan 10-09-2018 08:04

Quote:

Originally Posted by mbuster (Post 1311699)
I think there is plenty of factual science offered up in the article and more in the links, if you read them. My take, yes my opinion, looking at the FACTS is that both plant and animal food sources have many benefits and a few drawbacks. Humans eating carnivore or herbivore exclusively are not going to get all required nutrients, vitamins, minerals, etc., that are required.

Speaking of facts, that last sentence is not true. Humans can get every single nutrient they need from a carnivorous diet. They can get "most" of it from a purely plant-based diet with some effort, but NOT ALL. Humans can - and have at times - thrive just fine without ever killing a single plant for food.

mbuster 10-09-2018 12:53

I guess the question is how many people eat raw liver, raw fish roe, and raw eggs. Cooking them reduces vitamin C and we would likely be deficient in it without eating plants. Flavonoids are certainly beneficial and derived from plants. Fiber may not be a requirement but it is beneficial for gut health as a prebiotic.

Edit: requirement/required may be a misnomer.

mbuster 10-09-2018 13:29

Quote:

Originally Posted by mbuster (Post 1311699)
I think there is plenty of factual science offered up in the article and more in the links, if you read them. My take, yes my opinion, looking at the FACTS is that both plant and animal food sources have many benefits and a few drawbacks. Humans eating carnivore or herbivore exclusively are not going to get all required nutrients, vitamins, minerals, etc., that are required. Being an omnivore does not automatically mean they will not be deficient in something, but they have the best shot of not having a deficiency.

I believe the article mentions several times that not one diet, including keto is right for everyone.

I agree that doctors and nutritionists are biased in their recommendations, not so much because of what they like, but because of what they have been taught was good and bad. Brainwashed I think is a better choice of words than taught though. If they would actually check the FACTS and see what the real science says, they would question what is currently being recommended. Based on studies comparing diets, it should be obvious that the current SAD is one of the worst ways of eating ever recommended.

Medicine is much like politics, beliefs are built around greed and can be bought by anyone willing to pay a boat load of money for what they want.

And what they are taught is very little at the best. This study was published in Aug. 2015

Quote:

Abstract
Purpose . To assess the state of nutrition education at US medical schools and compare it with recommended instructional targets. Method . We surveyed all 133 US medical schools with a four-year curriculum about the extent and type of required nutrition education during the 2012/13 academic year. Results . Responses came from 121 institutions (91% response rate). Most US medical schools (86/121, 71%) fail to provide the recommended minimum 25 hours of nutrition education; 43 (36%) provide less than half that much. Nutrition instruction is still largely confined to preclinical courses, with an average of 14.3 hours occurring in this context. Less than half of all schools report teaching any nutrition in clinical practice; practice accounts for an average of only 4.7 hours overall. Seven of the 8 schools reporting at least 40 hours of nutrition instruction provided integrated courses together with clinical practice sessions. Conclusions . Many US medical schools still fail to prepare future physicians for everyday nutrition challenges in clinical practice. It cannot be a realistic expectation for physicians to effectively address obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, hospital malnutrition, and many other conditions as long as they are not taught during medical school and residency training how to recognize and treat the nutritional root causes.
(PDF) The State of Nutrition Education at US Medical Schools. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publica...edical_Schools [accessed Oct 09 2018].

smorgan 10-09-2018 15:18

Quote:

Originally Posted by mbuster (Post 1311723)
I guess the question is how many people eat raw liver, raw fish roe, and raw eggs. Cooking them reduces vitamin C and we would likely be deficient in it without eating plants. Flavonoids are certainly beneficial and derived from plants. Fiber may not be a requirement but it is beneficial for gut health as a prebiotic.

Edit: requirement/required may be a misnomer.

Not true. The "Limey" sailors knew that fresh meat (yes, COOKED) prevented scurvy. They only needed the limes if that ran out.

The inuit lived on zero plant matter and had no issues with Vitamin C deficiency. However, eating a lot of sugar and starch increases oxidative stress and lot and increases the need for Vitamin C and other anti-oxidants.

rsfletcher 10-15-2018 19:08

When I was on vacation last week I met my nephew's spouse. She's 28 and at least 350 + pounds and has hip issues because of her excessive weight. She's a vegan and she cooked dinner for us one day. I had very small servings and skipped on the bread altogether. I didn't want to cause an incident so I didn't say anything but because she was on a vegan diet she thought she was eating healthy. I can't help but think too many of us have been led down that Garden Path of high carbs are okay.

Hopefully she eventually clues in and makes some dietary adjustments but it took me years to figure it out and I suspect it will take just as long for her - at least she doesn't have diabetes to contend with although if she did maybe she would take a second look at her vegan diet.

xring 10-15-2018 19:43

Quote:

Originally Posted by rsfletcher (Post 1311895)
When I was on vacation last week I met my nephew's spouse. She's 28 and at least 350 + pounds and has hip issues because of her excessive weight. She's a vegan and she cooked dinner for us one day. I had very small servings and skipped on the bread altogether. I didn't want to cause an incident so I didn't say anything but because she was on a vegan diet she thought she was eating healthy. I can't help but think too many of us have been led down that Garden Path of high carbs are okay.

Hopefully she eventually clues in and makes some dietary adjustments but it took me years to figure it out and I suspect it will take just as long for her - at least she doesn't have diabetes to contend with although if she did maybe she would take a second look at her vegan diet.

She's not overweight because she's a vegan. She's overweight because she eats too much of the wrong things - likely processed carbs like bread, pasta, etc & maybe not enough vegetables. Processed sugar is vegan. So are French Fries. The word "vegan" or "vegetarian" doesn't always mean healthy.


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 15:24.

Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2021 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2021 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.