Our Stories: Dealing with the challenges of diabetes

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Our Stories: Dealing with the challenges of diabetes


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Old 05-02-2016, 20:14   #1
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Default Our Stories: Dealing with the challenges of diabetes

When people visit this community they usually have just learned they have diabetes or are facing challenges with the disease. They're often scared and/or frustrated. Most of us shared our stories in our intro, but those can be tough to wade through as they're independent longer threads. I thought it could be helpful to new members to have an anthology of sorts here, where we share briefly our own story and how we dealt with some of our own fears and challenges of diabetes.

If you have a question about a story you read in this thread, please just start a new thread with it, so we can keep this one dedicated to our stories only.

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Old 05-02-2016, 20:34   #2
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My story...

Even though there is quite a bit of insulin resistance and diabetes in my family, (and I had gestational diabetes through each of my pregnancies) it came as a complete shock to me when I was diagnosed with diabetes in 2012. I was in the best shape of my life and walking an average of 5-10 miles a day when I suddenly woke up in a hospital room. The doctor was talking to me about diabetes and I was trying to explain to him that he clearly had the wrong room because I most certainly was not diabetic. I was sure I had simply fainted or something.

He didn't have the wrong room...

No matter how carefully I followed their recommendations, every appointment, my meds were increased. At one point I reached 2,000 mg of Metformin ER daily along with ridiculous amounts of Glipizide ER, high blood pressure meds, etc. Instead of getting better, I was getting sicker and sicker. When the doctor told me it was time to make the move to insulin, I knew it was time to make a change. It was time for ME to choose to begin to take personal control of my diabetes. This was was when it all began to change for me.

It was then I began following the LCHF lifestyle almost by accident. (Trial and error!) I have never looked back. More recently, this forum has made a big difference for me - just talking to people who have been through what I have, makes all the difference in the world.
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Old 05-04-2016, 00:39   #3
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I was diagnosed at age 63 with a fasting of 170 (they neglected to order an A1C). I knew a little about diabetes and the role of carbohydrates, having read the Protein Power book and gone low-carb in the past for reactive hypoglycemia.

So I immediately dropped carbs, joined a low-carb forum which introduced me to Atkins Induction which I then began to follow (mostly because it relieved me of the chore of looking everything up in the beginning).

All this happened within a weeks' time and by the time I had my appointment with the diabetes educator, my BG was down. The practice test for the new meter I was going to get showed 143. Don't remember now how long after eating that was, but I know that the DE seemed surprised that it was that low.

I learned about LCHF on the forum, and have been making adjustments to my diet ever since, which has enabled me to keep my BG well below 120 most of the time. It has taken several years to get to where this lifestyle is now my "normal" and there have been ups and downs, but I'm fairly confident now after 6+ years of LCHF that I can stay the course for the rest of my life.

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Old 05-04-2016, 01:15   #4
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Reading the title of this thread - Dealing with the challenges of diabetes - I'll add that my personality is to see challenges as something to be learned about and overcome. So that's what I did with my diabetes. I just went about finding ways that I could overcome and work around this new set of limitations.

I think having worked through the steps of a lifestyle change when I had to give up several mainstay foods several years before the diabetes dx saved me from having to go through the emotions of a radical change a second time and I was quick to accept it.

Still, it all does isolate me from other people in that most social events are food-centered and I cannot, or many times choose not, to attend and/or participate.

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Old 05-04-2016, 05:52   #5
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I, on the other hand, found out how to eat out and found that eating prior to events made me able to just eat the celery and other foods and nothing other. I don't go to functions with pre-ordered meals, but don't miss a chance to eat with others as I am an extrovert and love eating with others. I had to find work arounds quick. Now, I did eat the induction meals for a few months until I learned what was poison for me and what I could order my way at restaurants. Even some banquet meals will allow a bit of that...a salad instead of a dessert for example and dressing on the salad or none at all. We have to learn what works for each of us and our personal needs in order to stick with it as our life menu.




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Old 05-15-2016, 14:10   #6
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Quote:
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Still, it all does isolate me from other people in that most social events are food-centered and I cannot, or many times choose not, to attend and/or participate.
VeeJay, this is what I am dealing with right now. Every social event is centered around food and it feels like I am left out. Some places I can take my own food, but a lot of places I can't. You have chosen to not participate? How long did it take for you to accept this part of diabetes and not feel down or depressed about it? Interested because this last week I feel like I took a spiral into depression.

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Old 05-15-2016, 14:38   #7
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There's more to my situation than just the diabetes. There's the gluten issue which is HUGE and overshadows everything. I had to give up a lot with gluten over a decade ago and that is actually more isolating than not eating carbs. So when I went LCHF, it really didn't have quite the emotional impact for me.

But, in the beginning of a major change in one's life, I think a bit of depression is part of the normal grieving process (yes, giving up a lifestyle does bring on a sense of loss). Often times we don't know anyone else doing this - that's where visiting this forum often, and "venting" now, and then is so helpful, and continually reading of others' successes and strategies keeps me motivated, even now.

I'm sure most of your friends and family will, after they get used to the "new you" will make accommodations for you and you would be able to at least partake of a few things on the menu - meats and vegetables without sauces. You could bring a dessert to the table - and show off just how good LCHF eating can be. (This "showing off" is good for one's own morale, too.)

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70 yrs. Dx May 2010
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Eat no grains
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Old 05-15-2016, 15:35   #8
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Quote:
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There's more to my situation than just the diabetes. There's the gluten issue which is HUGE and overshadows everything. I had to give up a lot with gluten over a decade ago and that is actually more isolating than not eating carbs. So when I went LCHF, it really didn't have quite the emotional impact for me.

But, in the beginning of a major change in one's life, I think a bit of depression is part of the normal grieving process (yes, giving up a lifestyle does bring on a sense of loss). Often times we don't know anyone else doing this - that's where visiting this forum often, and "venting" now, and then is so helpful, and continually reading of others' successes and strategies keeps me motivated, even now.

I'm sure most of your friends and family will, after they get used to the "new you" will make accommodations for you and you would be able to at least partake of a few things on the menu - meats and vegetables without sauces. You could bring a dessert to the table - and show off just how good LCHF eating can be. (This "showing off" is good for one's own morale, too.)
This forum has been a huge help to me already. Reading about other's experiences, finding out information, and those who have answered my "newbie" questions--all SO good. Giving up gluten must have been hard!! I think my body doesn't like wheat flour. So that's a game changer for me, too.

I'm still getting used to the "new me" so I know it's hard for others. I've looked through the Recipes forum and gotten several good recipes for the treats I miss. I like your idea of "showing off" just how good the LCHF eating can be.

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Old 05-16-2016, 03:52   #9
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On the dashboard of my car I have a little sign that says: TEST/EAT. I follow those directions every time I start to drive, and this is why:
One day, after helping a friend in her classroom all morning, I felt great and got in my car to drive home. As I got into the flow of traffic, I suddenly realized I had no idea where I was or where I was going. I was scared, and everything was going too fast. I didn't know how to get off the road. (I've been driving for 50 years.) I don't know how long I kept driving before I was finally able to pull over and stop, but then I couldn't figure out what to do. I saw people walking by, kids on their way home perhaps, and cars kept whizzing by, but I was completely lost and completely confused. I opened the car door, but I didn't know to what purpose, so I pulled it shut again. Then I noticed a bag of dried apricots on the seat beside me, and I suddenly got the idea to eat. I ate several, and began to become aware that I had a dangerously low blood sugar, especially in a car. Finally I was able to test myself, and I waited until I was back to normal before I headed for home. Of course I had driven way out of my way, but I knew exactly where I was when my blood sugar was OK.
I will never drive again without testing first, and my son follows my practice. I only eat when I need to, but the note reminds me in case I am so low I can't remember that is what I need.

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Old 05-16-2016, 04:11   #10
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On the dashboard of my car I have a little sign that says: TEST/EAT. I follow those directions every time I start to drive, and this is why:
One day, after helping a friend in her classroom all morning, I felt great and got in my car to drive home. As I got into the flow of traffic, I suddenly realized I had no idea where I was or where I was going. I was scared, and everything was going too fast. I didn't know how to get off the road. (I've been driving for 50 years.) I don't know how long I kept driving before I was finally able to pull over and stop, but then I couldn't figure out what to do. I saw people walking by, kids on their way home perhaps, and cars kept whizzing by, but I was completely lost and completely confused. I opened the car door, but I didn't know to what purpose, so I pulled it shut again. Then I noticed a bag of dried apricots on the seat beside me, and I suddenly got the idea to eat. I ate several, and began to become aware that I had a dangerously low blood sugar, especially in a car. Finally I was able to test myself, and I waited until I was back to normal before I headed for home. Of course I had driven way out of my way, but I knew exactly where I was when my blood sugar was OK.
I will never drive again without testing first, and my son follows my practice. I only eat when I need to, but the note reminds me in case I am so low I can't remember that is what I need.
Kathyrn, what you wrote is interesting and eye opening for me. I have had similar experiences, not able to think and figure things out. I get confused as to what I am doing, what I have done, what's next. My husband seems to think I am getting Alzheimer's like my mom. But later I can think through problems with no problem. I haven't linked it to needing to eat.

A friend of mine had a glucose monitor she didn't need and asked if I could use it. So it should be arriving at my house this week. So I can begin testing.

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