High C-peptide levels linked to death and heart disease in nondiabetic adults

Go Back   The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online > Diabetes Forum Start Here > Diabetes News

Diabetes News The Diabetes News section is a place to share any new stories or information you have come across related to Diabetes for the rest of the forum to share and discuss. If you have seen or read about new medication, diabetes treatments, medical breakthroughs or any interesting stories of personal interest then please post and discuss them here. From time to time we will take some of the Diabetes News stories from this section and write them up in our Diabetes Blog.


Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By kantim
  • 1 Post By kantim

High C-peptide levels linked to death and heart disease in nondiabetic adults


Closed Thread
 
Shared Thread Thread Tools
Old 04-16-2013, 12:38   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,288

Member Type
Type Pre
Diagnosed in 2005

1124 likes received
692 likes given
Default High C-peptide levels linked to death and heart disease in nondiabetic adults

C-peptide levels linked to death and heart disease in nondiabetic adults

High blood levels of the serum C-peptide are linked to heart disease and death in people without diabetes, according to a large study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Researchers looked at data from the Third Nutrition and Health Examination Survey (NHANES III) and the NHANES III Linked Mortality File to determine the link between C-peptide levels and death from all causes as well as from heart disease. They looked at mortality data on 5902 adults aged 40 years or older representative of the US population. People with high serum C-peptide levels (higher than 1.018 nmol/L) had a 1.8- to 3.2-fold increased risk of death from all causes as well as cardiovascular disease–specific death compared with people with low C-peptide levels (lower than 0.440 nmol/L). The risk increased as C-peptide levels increased.

"We found a significant association between serum C-peptide levels and risk of all-cause, cardiovascular-related disease and coronary artery–related mortality among adults without diabetes," writes Dr. Kyoung-bok Min, Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea, with coauthor.

The study authors found that C-peptide levels were better at predicting mortality than other measures such as glycated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose. Although the reason for the increased risk of death has not been determined, the authors suggest it may be because of the relationship between C-peptide levels and risk factors for atherogenic vascular issues.

"Our findings support the potential relevance of serum C-peptide as a predictor of adverse health outcomes and indicate that elevated C-peptide levels may be an important predictive marker of an increased risk of death," they conclude.

MCS likes this.
kantim is offline  
Old 04-16-2013, 16:49   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Kansas City, MO USA
Posts: 5,911

Member Type
Type 1
Diagnosed in 2009 as Type 1.5

5212 likes received
9205 likes given
Default

People go back and forth on insulin and CV damage ... "it's the blood sugar levels." "It's the insulin levels." Interesting to see how it plays out ...

foxl is offline  
Old 04-16-2013, 17:47   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,288

Member Type
Type Pre
Diagnosed in 2005

1124 likes received
692 likes given
Default

Injected insulin doesn't contain c peptide, but drugs that make the pancreas work all the time like the sulfonylureas and meglitinides will raise the c peptides.
Another reason why they may not be a good option for a diabetic.

foxl likes this.
kantim is offline  
 
Old 04-16-2013, 23:18   #4
Moderator
 
mbuster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: SW Arkansas
Posts: 9,071

Member Type
Type 2
Diagnosed in Feb. 2012

11017 likes received
6168 likes given
Default

But is it the high c-peptide that is damaging or the high level of insulin it is indicative of; we know that is also indicative of higher BG, but we all know that causes damage, with or without additional insulin.

__________________
Think I've had this since 2003. Told I was Type 2 lean on 2/13/12.
a1c 8.8 (8/2011) 5.4 (10/2018)
TC 206 LDL 102 HDL 85 TG 96 (10/2018)
Supplemental vitamins and electrolytes
64 YY Love the LCHF diet. The cheese goes well with my whine

updated 10/31/19
mbuster is online now  
Old 04-17-2013, 00:31   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,288

Member Type
Type Pre
Diagnosed in 2005

1124 likes received
692 likes given
Default

It could be just the insulin or maybe the inflammation that causes insulin resistance but C peptides have been found to be a bioactive peptide in its own right, with effects on micro vascular blood flow and tissue health. Maybe too little or too much c peptide is not a good thing.

C-peptide - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cellular effects of C-peptide

C-peptide has been shown to bind to the surface of a number of cell types such as neuronal, endothelial, fibroblast and renal tubular, at nanomolar concentrations to a receptor that is likely G-protein-coupled. The signal activates Ca2+-dependent intracellular signaling pathways such as MAPK, PLC?, and PKC, leading to upregulation of a range of transcription factors as well as eNOS and Na+K+ATPase activities.[3] The latter two enzymes are known to have reduced activities in patients with type I diabetes and have been implicated in the development of long-term complications of type I diabetes such as peripheral and autonomic neuropathy.

In vivo studies in animal models of type 1 diabetes have established that C-peptide administration results in significant improvements in nerve and kidney function. Thus, in animals with early signs of diabetes-induced neuropathy, C peptide treatment in replacement dosage results in improved peripheral nerve function, as evidenced by increased nerve conduction velocity, increased nerve Na+,K+ ATPase activity, and significant amelioration of nerve structural changes.[4] Likewise, C-peptide administration in animals that had C-peptide deficiency (type 1 model) with nephropathy improves renal function and structure; it decreases urinary albumin excretion and prevents or decreases diabetes-induced glomerular changes secondary to mesangial matrix expansion.[5][6][7][8] C-peptide also has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects as well as aid repair of smooth muscle cells.[9][10]

kantim is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
High Omega-3 Risk of Dying from Heart Disease Significantly Lowered kantim Diabetes Forum Lounge 1 04-03-2013 14:19
Common Antibiotic Linked To Heart Problems kantim Diabetes Forum Lounge 0 03-23-2013 12:28
Type 1 diabetes may be linked to infectious disease burden kantim Diabetes News 0 03-19-2013 13:14
Low magnesium levels have been found to be the best predictor of heart disease kantim Diabetes News 0 02-03-2013 11:27
Insulin and C-Peptide levels adamlinds Diabetes Symptoms 17 02-07-2010 03:33

LEGAL NOTICE
By using this Website, you agree to abide by our Terms and Conditions (the "Terms"). This notice does not replace our Terms, which you must read in full as they contain important information. You must not post any defamatory, unlawful or undesirable content, or any content copied from a third party, on the Website. You must not copy material from the Website except in accordance with the Terms. This Website gives users an opportunity to share information only and is not intended to contain any advice which you should rely upon. It does not replace the need to take professional or other advice. We have no liability to you or any other person in respect of any content on this Website.


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:22.




Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.