"Endocrinologists with diabetes" Google search fail

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"Endocrinologists with diabetes" Google search fail


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Old 07-11-2018, 01:24   #1
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Default "Endocrinologists with diabetes" Google search fail

Anyone else ever gone on that search on or off line and any success ?



www.google.com/search?q="endocrinologists+with+diabetes"

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Old 07-11-2018, 01:49   #2
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T12018, what failed? What are you looking for that constitutes "success"?

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Old 07-11-2018, 03:51   #3
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I would be curious what % of Endo's in US actually has type 1 diabetes.

There is a growing shortage of Endocrinologists. Currently, fewer than 6500 endocrinologists in the United States are available to care for the millions of patients who suffer from diabetes, thyroid disease, osteoporosis, and other hormonal conditions. Although this shortage has many contributing factors, poor compensation is a key driving force. This situation has prompted many physicians to choose other specialties, resulting in a workforce shortage, with 3- to 6-month wait times for an appointment and an estimated 46,000 patients for every endocrinologist.

Data from large epidemiologic studies worldwide indicate that the incidence of T1D has been increasing by 2–5% worldwide and that the prevalence of T1D is approximately 1 in 300 in the US by 18 years of age

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Diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes Sept 12 1977
Developed Hypoglycemic Unawareness Dec 83
8 grandmal seizures requiring paramedics + ER
Dx heart disease in 2000; triple bypass surgery
2 pancreas organ transplants 2001+2004 at Univ Minn & Univ Calif San Francisco med ctr
Dx with cancer twice 2007 & 2008, stage 2 & 3
Lost 2 transplanted pancreas; 6/2001 & 6/2015
Longtime advocate & member of diabetes & cancer support forums for 15 yrs. A1c 5.0

Last edited by Hearts Jounrey; 07-11-2018 at 03:56.
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Old 07-11-2018, 08:15   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hearts Jounrey View Post
I would be curious what % of Endo's in US actually has type 1 diabetes.

There is a growing shortage of Endocrinologists. Currently, fewer than 6500 endocrinologists in the United States are available to care for the millions of patients who suffer from diabetes, thyroid disease, osteoporosis, and other hormonal conditions. Although this shortage has many contributing factors, poor compensation is a key driving force. This situation has prompted many physicians to choose other specialties, resulting in a workforce shortage, with 3- to 6-month wait times for an appointment and an estimated 46,000 patients for every endocrinologist.

Data from large epidemiologic studies worldwide indicate that the incidence of T1D has been increasing by 2–5% worldwide and that the prevalence of T1D is approximately 1 in 300 in the US by 18 years of age
Let me see if I've got this right. 1 in 300, the current T1 rate comes out to 0.334% of the population. If this rate represents a 5% increase from previous rates (high end of your range), that means the previous rate was 0.323% of the population or 1,169,000 individuals. Calling that a "5% increase" while mathematically accurate will give the average person a very wrong impression. The reality of these numbers is that at most an additional 0.011% of the population (assuming 100% accuracy of these numbers) now has T1. That's a total of 38,500 people in the US population, added to the original 1,169,000.

If this is correct, let's please keep this in perspective and stop saying things like "both T1 and T2 are increasing"! This is an utterly trivial margin-of-error increase whereas experts estimate that T2 has increased somewhere between THREE-FOLD (200% increase) and FIVE-FOLD (400% increase) in the last half century or so. That translates to increasing from less than 10,000,000 people to now nearly 35,000,000 people, not to mention approximately 165,000,000 people with metabolic syndrome/impaired glucose metabolism, some large number of whom are likely on their way to outright T2 diabetes.

The estimated increase in T1 could be a lot of things and may not actually be a real increase. It could be better lifespan (less early death from other things), better reporting and data gathering or just plain margin of error. The increase in T2 on the other hand even if greatly skewed by one of the aforementioned is without doubt HUGE and nearly 100 times the magnitude of any possible increase in T1.

This reinforces the theory that T1 is genetically determined whereas T2, though there probably is a genetic component, is by and large environmentally (primarily diet, lifesytle) caused.

There is also some evidence that high prevalence of T2 can increase T1 rates in subsequent generations which may account for the tiny increase in T1.

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Old 07-11-2018, 19:00   #5
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1977
Boston researchers develop a test to measure glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C). A1C testing becomes the gold standard for measuring long-term diabetes control.

1979
The National Diabetes Data Group develops a new diabetes classification system: 1) insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, 2) non-insulin-dependent or type 2 diabetes, 3) gestational diabetes, and 4) diabetes associated with other syndromes or conditions.

1997
The terms “insulin-dependent diabetes” (IDDM) and “non-insulin-dependent diabetes” (NIDDM) had long been used to describe different groups of diabetes patients. The terms type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are now accepted to define diabetes by cause rather than treatment. In addition, the fasting glucose level for diagnosing diabetes is lowered from 140 mg/dl to 126 mg/dl.

2002
The American Diabetes Association defines prediabetes as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). IFG is defined as a fasting blood glucose of 100-125 mg/dl, and IGT is defined as a glucose level from 140 mg/dl – 199 mg/dl two hours after consuming a glucose-rich drink. Later, A1C levels of 5.7% to 6.4% are also used to identify individuals with prediabetes.

History of Diabetes: American Diabetes Association®

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Diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes Sept 12 1977
Developed Hypoglycemic Unawareness Dec 83
8 grandmal seizures requiring paramedics + ER
Dx heart disease in 2000; triple bypass surgery
2 pancreas organ transplants 2001+2004 at Univ Minn & Univ Calif San Francisco med ctr
Dx with cancer twice 2007 & 2008, stage 2 & 3
Lost 2 transplanted pancreas; 6/2001 & 6/2015
Longtime advocate & member of diabetes & cancer support forums for 15 yrs. A1c 5.0
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Old 07-11-2018, 19:28   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hearts Jounrey View Post
1977
Boston researchers develop a test to measure glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C). A1C testing becomes the gold standard for measuring long-term diabetes control.

1979
The National Diabetes Data Group develops a new diabetes classification system: 1) insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, 2) non-insulin-dependent or type 2 diabetes, 3) gestational diabetes, and 4) diabetes associated with other syndromes or conditions.

1997
The terms “insulin-dependent diabetes” (IDDM) and “non-insulin-dependent diabetes” (NIDDM) had long been used to describe different groups of diabetes patients. The terms type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are now accepted to define diabetes by cause rather than treatment. In addition, the fasting glucose level for diagnosing diabetes is lowered from 140 mg/dl to 126 mg/dl.

2002
The American Diabetes Association defines prediabetes as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). IFG is defined as a fasting blood glucose of 100-125 mg/dl, and IGT is defined as a glucose level from 140 mg/dl – 199 mg/dl two hours after consuming a glucose-rich drink. Later, A1C levels of 5.7% to 6.4% are also used to identify individuals with prediabetes.

History of Diabetes: American Diabetes Association®
The change in thresholds is real but of limited impact. This is because once it is "diabetes" there is a sudden acceleration in rate of change. Blood sugar doesn't just drift slowly upward. Well, actually it does - VERY slowly - in both non-diabetics, not-yet diabetics. When diabetes is there, BG will rise rapidly over just a few years. So, while it's true that 126 may be called "diabetes" where before it took 140 to get that label, that 126 will BECOME 140 very soon, probably less than 3 years if untreated. So, in the big picture, that would have very limited effect on the global data. That's assuming that they are "correct" that most or all of those reaching 126 are in fact diabetics. I think they are.

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DX: 9/2009 A1C=10.7
A1C 2/2010: 6.7 (DX + 4 months)
A1C 5/2010: 6.0 (DX + 8 months)
A1C 8/2010: 5.7 (DX + 11 months)
A1C 11/2010: 5.1 (DX + 14 months)
A1C 9/2011: 5.6 (DX + 2 years)
A1C 7/2012: 5.5 (DX + 2 years 10 months)
A1C 1/2019: 5.5
Diet: Approximately C:10;P:15;F:75 (as % calories)
Exercise: Not much. Stairs at home & work.
NO MEDS, No Highs, No Lows
Grandkids: 22
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Old 07-11-2018, 19:50   #7
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Currently, fewer than 6500 endocrinologists in the United States... 1 in 300, the current T1 rate.

6500/300=21.66

That simple math won't work because I think being type 1 would motivate people to become endocrinologists.

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Old 07-11-2018, 19:59   #8
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I have always had a hard time thinking of someone who has a IGT with glucose level between 140 mg/dl – 199 mg/dl two hours after consuming a glucose-rich drink is only a 'pre diabetic', especially if the glucose is closer to the higher limit (over 175). Can you imagine if the IGT range for pre-diabetes was revised to say 125 to 150, how many more millions would be classified with type 2 diabetes. You mean someone who eats X amt of carbs and gets tested 2 hrs later with a glucose of 190 isnt a type 2? If someone gets a a1c of 6.4 with mean glucose value of just under 140, impaired is not a strong enough term. imagine how often someones blood sugar is significantly over 140 with A1c of 6.4

When i had my pancreas transplant in 2004 as a type 1, for the first 2 months after surgery i had elevated glucose levels between 140 and 180 and my transplant team said its fine as long as it was under 200. I disagreed strenuously and said i am going to consistently achieve a range of 85 to 140 with A1c between 5.6 and 6.0 which i did for many years by limiting my carbs daily to under 150 daily.

IGT - After a fast of 8 to 12 hours, a person's blood glucose is measured before and 2 hours after drinking a glucose-containing solution.

Is total carb count for glucose drink still 75g?

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Diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes Sept 12 1977
Developed Hypoglycemic Unawareness Dec 83
8 grandmal seizures requiring paramedics + ER
Dx heart disease in 2000; triple bypass surgery
2 pancreas organ transplants 2001+2004 at Univ Minn & Univ Calif San Francisco med ctr
Dx with cancer twice 2007 & 2008, stage 2 & 3
Lost 2 transplanted pancreas; 6/2001 & 6/2015
Longtime advocate & member of diabetes & cancer support forums for 15 yrs. A1c 5.0

Last edited by Hearts Jounrey; 07-11-2018 at 20:05.
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Old 07-11-2018, 20:40   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T12018 View Post
Currently, fewer than 6500 endocrinologists in the United States... 1 in 300, the current T1 rate.

6500/300=21.66

That simple math won't work because I think being type 1 would motivate people to become endocrinologists.
Dr. Richard Bernstein, a mechanical engineer, went to med school when he was 45 to become a doctor (endo). He had been diagnosed as type 1 at age 12.

When I first saw the post, I thought the direction this thread would head was would you rather use a type 1 endo or a non-diabetic endo. I then thought about the 2 barber town, one with a great haircut and one with one not so great, which one would you use? Maybe not along the same line because an endo might be his own health advocate.

I'm back on graveyard shift, got up wide awake with not enough sleep, and my mind wanders around with little clarity when I don't get enough sleep.

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