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Diabetes Treatment As there is currently no cure for the chronic, Diabetes mellitus – the emphasis must be on treatment and management to avoid complications. Please use this section to discuss how you carefully control and manage your Diabetes. Please let us know what is and isn’t working for you. Feel free to discuss all areas of treatment and management of Diabetes including diet, exercise, weight loss, insulin usage, oral drugs and more.


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Old 12-09-2018, 17:30   #1
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Default Hi, I’m New to forum

I need help! I see all these posts about clinics where they say you can get off all your meds, that Big Farma wants you to stay on meds cause it’s their profit! I know that doctors get their medication education from the pharmacology reps and of course the reps want the doctor to prescribe their meds! I just want to be healthy! I was diagnosed pre-diabetic about 5 years and my endo, who is a close family friend, gives me samples of Januvia which I have been taking once a day! I am very fit and thin and have no real signs of diabetes (lots of energy and take care of my 6 grandkids part of every day) however my morning BG continues to rise, a few months ago 130ish and has been 150ish for the past week! I just had blood drawn and will find out my AIC this coming week but last one was 6.7 . I am extremely frustrated as I eat very healthy and stay away from anything white (bread, rice, pasta, etc.) no sweets unless sugar free! Althoufgh I do not eat much during the day, i do snack a lot a night after a good dinner, but on Nuts and low carb Atkins snacks! My doctor wants me to add several more medications as he said most diabetics are on 3-5 meds! But these are designer drugs and my medicare/part D does not cover teir 3-4 meds! I can’t afford $400-$800 month! I’ve also been given different advise by different medical professionals - my doctor says no fruit ever at night and I had a nutritionist tell me an apple with a tablespoon of peanut butter was a great late night snack! Please I need help!

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Old 12-09-2018, 18:31   #2
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Hi, Boo! Welcome to the forum. I'm assuming you're a pre-type 2?

The first thing I would recommend is to read Dr. Richard Bernstein's book on diabetes. That's where I started. A lot of what you are eating may be 'sugar free,' but many things that are labeled 'sugar free' are loaded with carbs. Carbs are what you need to keep track of. If you want to avoid expensive meds, you need to re-examine your diet to make sure you're not overdoing things that make your blood glucose rise. I wouldn't think an apple with peanut butter as a night snack is a good idea. Depending on your situation, a modest amount of fruit is ok, for example, berries....a handful usually doesn't hurt, but if it does, you probably need to avoid it.

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Old 12-09-2018, 19:14   #3
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The sugar free foods I am eating are low glycemic and no carbs - they are products from Know foods or choczero keto chocolate bark or Atkins bars or sugar free popsicles! I do not eat sugar free cookies or cakes because they do have carbs!

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Old 12-09-2018, 19:16   #4
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And yes I am type 2.

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Old 12-10-2018, 00:41   #5
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Hello, Boo4Six! Welcome to the forum.

Cassie's recommendation is a good one. Always helps to know the enemy (carbs), right?

Though there are some generalities, diabetes is a little different for everyone who has it and we all try to treat our diabetes the way that works best for us. The way to know how your body reacts to what you eat and how active you are is to test, test, test with your meter.

Do you take more readings than just the fasting blood glucose in the morning? Do you know how well your body responds to eating dinner and then to the snacking which follows? Are you open to eating different food items (or not eating some specific ones) to try to determine what's going on?

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Old 12-10-2018, 15:47   #6
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Welcome Boo.....Many of us have been where you are. Unfortunately the 'Medical Community' does not all agree on many aspects of managing diabetes. I have been a type 2 Diabetic for over 14 years now. I did not understand many aspects of this disease until I found our website and studied the website http://www.bloodsugar101.com/! Here I found good answers backed up with research and logic. Check it out!

Many of us here focus on eating low carb/high fat diets and managing our blood sugars 24/7. This is not really a diet in that you do not have to cut back on your food intake, just high carb foods like...food with any type of sugars, syrups, etc.; root crops (carrots, potatoes, etc.); all fruits, except maybe a few strawberries or blueberries (Other fruits are loaded with sugars), anything with flours; and most prepared foods....then the magic of low carb high fat, LCHF, is that we supplement our lack of carbs intake (many on here eat less than 30g of carbs a day) with fats, all kinds of fats. Our bodies learn within a few days how to use fat for energy instead of sugar...and your blood sugar then stabilizes and you begin to take control of your disease. ...And NO our Cholesterols do not go up beyond safe levels...

Bad news is that their is no such thing as 'prediabetes'. This diagnosis tells us your bodies ability to produce insulin has been compromised and you are therefore a diabetic. But, by controlling your blood sugars 24/7 by eating low carb, you can minimize or avoid any health issues caused by diabetes, many of which are life threatening. Most people I know agree that there is no cure for diabetes, but you can control it. Anyone selling a cure is a FAKE!

As for meds, I agree with your doctor, most diabetics are on medication. But I disagree with that doctor on what meds to use. Most of us stay away from the 'designer' drugs, they are unproven and the lists of side affects are deep! I personally was put on Januvia when I was first diagnosed. It caused me to have ongoing upper respiratory infections that required heavy antibiotics to be stopped. Once I figured out it was the Januvia, I stopped taking it … and I have not had even a chest cold since, 10 years now! The tried and true meds for diabetics, with type 2 are metformin and both slow acting and fast acting insulin injections. If taking insulin many of us take only one type. Both of these drugs have been used in mass for a very long while, therefore very few unknown side affects and in combination they do the job for most of us. Medicare related drug providers will cover most of the costs, although you have to shop well on who you choose for drug coverage, as some of the providers in recent years is spiking the cost of insulin.

Check out the website, do the reading, and then do some research of your own. I did that in 2015 when I found this website. That changed my life and I believe saved my life! I am healthier and in better overall health since I learned this program of managing my Blood Sugar 24/7 and eating LCHF all the time.....

Come on in the water really is fine...


Last edited by VeeJay; 12-10-2018 at 18:23. Reason: Spelling... crabs to carbs
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Old 12-13-2018, 06:26   #7
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Wow! These posts are so full of information! I am still getting used to taking my bg more then just the morning! I have also been very diligent on watching what I am eating and cutting out carbs! I do think I need to meet with a nutritionist to help plan my meals but I do t know where to go to find one! It is still hard for me to understand why I have gotten such different information as a nurse told me that a good snack was apple slices and peanut butter but it is clear to me that apples have way too much sugar! My doctor, although reluctant to put me on metformin, said he will do so but he wants to monitor me to make sure there are no kidney problems caused by metformin! He also wants me to continue with januvia as well as take a once weekly Injection! He said he will give me samples of ozempic and if it works he will write a letter to my insurance company in hopes of getting it covered on my part D plan! I’m just wondering if I need to get a second opinion with perhaps a younger endocrinologist. I feel like right now this is all consuming and with the holidays coming up I am a bit nervious if I can stick to my no carb diet! Also how do I have family dinners and cook separate things for me and for the rest of my family! There are 14 of us with my children and grand children and often a few more when we have the in laws!

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Old 12-13-2018, 13:30   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boo4Six View Post
a nurse told me that a good snack was apple slices and peanut butter but it is clear to me that apples have way too much sugar!
There is a deep-seated belief in health care that humans should subsist mostly on carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates are not an essential nutrient the way fat and protein are. Our bodies can create the carbs we need through fat and protein. For people whose bodies have trouble managing glucose levels and insulin, it makes sense to not pile on the carbs and then have to take medications or added insulin to manage the excess.

But change is slow. Many health care providers carry with them only what they were taught in school about nutrition; some keep themselves up to date on diabetes treatment; others don't.

You will find that you will become your own best advocate for your care. Read, talk with people, do your research, and determine what works best for your body by testing your blood glucose levels.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boo4Six View Post
My doctor, although reluctant to put me on metformin, said he will do so but he wants to monitor me to make sure there are no kidney problems caused by metformin! He also wants me to continue with januvia as well as take a once weekly Injection! He said he will give me samples of ozempic and if it works he will write a letter to my insurance company in hopes of getting it covered on my part D plan! Iím just wondering if I need to get a second opinion with perhaps a younger endocrinologist.
Of course, we cannot provide medical advice. But, speaking personally, I'd want to know 1) why the doctor wants to throw so many medications (most of which have serious potential side effects) at your diabetes and; 2) why he didn't start with Metformin, which is widely available, inexpensive, and well-tolerated by most who take it and frequently the first medication prescribed for people with diabetes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boo4Six View Post
I feel like right now this is all consuming and with the holidays coming up I am a bit nervious if I can stick to my no carb diet! Also how do I have family dinners and cook separate things for me and for the rest of my family!
You are making a lot of changes right now, so it's easy to understand that it feels overwhelming. Just keep trying to put one foot in front of the other and you'll do well.

You don't have to cook separate holiday foods for everyone. Check out the Recipe forum here and you'll find many tasty foods that aren't full of carbs. There also are many Web sites geared to low-carb or ketogenic cooking; you could pretty well cook a complete keto holiday feast if you're inclined to do the cooking. In my house we cook mostly keto and even my non-keto-eating wife is happy to eat those same meals.

As for sticking to a very low carb diet during the holidays, it can be tough! Be kind to yourself. Take a bite or two (or three) of the foods you really miss and enjoy them. No need to "pig out".

And no need to get on your own case about maybe not doing your low-carb best during celebrations which are highly focused on food. If you're motivated, you will develop the skills you need to pass by foods which will raise your blood glucose levels. You'll learn to cook new dishes you may love as much or more than the old ones. Diabetes is a life-long condition; taking a step aside rather than continuous steps forward is not unusual.

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Old 12-13-2018, 14:01   #9
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As with any change of eating, it takes some time to get used to it. The Holidays are a difficult time to do this. If you can reduce or eliminate some of the high-carb foods that would be good. Then after the holidays you can be more aggressive.

Low-carb eating does take some planning, and looking up the grams of carbohydrates of the food we eat. As Steve mentioned, there are many sites dedicated to the low-carb or keto way of eating.

Menus and recipes for low-carb eating:
Linda's Low Carb Menus & Recipes - Home
I found this site very helpful in the beginning when I didn't want to hunt around for recipes and meal plans.

One of the many good low-carb blogs by a really good cook.
https://www.ibreatheimhungry.com/recipes

When I first started eating low-carb, I went to the Adkin's website. The Induction or Phase I plan is less than 30 grams per day. I printed out the food lists for this plan, eliminating the need to look up anything as the carb grams were indicated for each food. There were menus and recipes for the plan, also. Made my new lifestyle much easier.

A word of caution. Other than metformin, most diabetes drugs cause an increase in insulin production which means that if you greatly reduce carbs while taking them, your blood sugar could go too low. It would be prudent to reduce carbs slowly and monitor BG often - you may find that you need to reduce the doses or that you don't need them at all. Metformin works in the liver to reduce insulin resistance so it isn't going to cause a hypo situation.

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Eat no grains

Last edited by VeeJay; 12-13-2018 at 14:03.
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Old 12-13-2018, 15:21   #10
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Hi Boo4Six, welcome to the forum.

There is a lot of info out there about diabetes. The most trusted source should be the ADA (American Diabetes Association). Many, if not most, of us here have discovered that their recommendations still did not get our BG down into the safe levels. They recommend eating too many carbs, they recommend too high of a safe BG level, and they are happy with a too high A1c. Please do go to the BloodSugar 101 website, it is well worth the time spent there. All of the information there shows the sources of the research the author did.

I have found most nutritionist adhere strictly to the ADA recommendations. This may work initially because most of us were eating a lot more carbs than their recommendation, so we did see an improvement in our BG. Yes our BG did come down, but not low enough. Studies show that BG over 140 mg/dL can cause damage, that over the long haul, are called the inevitable complications of diabetes. The ADA thinks going up to 180 mg/dL is OK. Now you got to wonder, what if carbs were reduced a little more and the frequency and duration of BG going over 140 were greatly reduced or eliminated? Would the inevitable really be inevitable?

Here is a website showing a list of low carb nutritionists and dietitians, maybe you live near one of them. If not, there is a larger list of low carb medical practitioners you can access on the webpage of the link above, maybe one of them is close by. If neither are located where a visit would be practical, you can use your favorite search engine to find out plenty about low carb on the WWW. You can always ask questions here on the forum and we can tell you what has worked for us.

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Supplemental vitamins and electrolytes
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updated 10/26/18

Last edited by mbuster; 12-13-2018 at 15:26.
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