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glwilso8 03-17-2016 06:03

trying to make some sense of it all
 
i'm at a spot where some of these things i've been learning and experiencing are hard to wrap my head around. sometimes all i have are theories. so, here goes.... i've read a few threads on exercise and noted some folks talking about bs going up. originally i could get up to a 50 point drop from exercise. now its moderate but good. my usual weight routine consists of 20 reps at my "earned" weight for the exercise. great results. i bumped the weight up and was only able to do 5 of one 8 of another and only did 10 of the rest. my bs went up about 21 points. i would like to think it was from a liver dump. thoughts? my morning bs is mostly 100 to 110- i usually don't eat until 12 or 2pm but my bs rides up unbidden (consciously) to 115 124 with nothing to eat. could this be the liver anticipating a need level or perhaps the protein digestion delay from eating before bedtime say 12 to 2am? will or should eliminating more body fat help to bring those levels down? my goal is, of course, 83 to 90 bs avge. i think i got what was giant strides out of the way now i think i'm down the hard work-the brass tacks-if you will. my last weeks average was bs 106, any suggestions?

mbuster 03-17-2016 12:07

My BG usually goes up in the morning, eat or not. I think mine is a cortisol induced.

I usually see lower numbers from exercise, but have seen higher numbers if I get hot or try to push it on a bike ride. I think those times are cortisol related and/or getting in a state where fat needs to convert to glycogen for fuel or vice versa.

This may be all flawed theory on my part though.

VeeJay 03-17-2016 13:04

It's my understanding that the muscles also store glycogen which is released during exercise to fuel the muscles - and for some this can cause BG to rise during exercise. I have also read that even with this initial rise when exercising, that once BG goes back down it stays lower for the rest of the day. YMMV

glwilso8, you seem to be going to bed late, are you on shift work? When are you getting up - how many hours is it between then and when you do eat? I know that my BG rises to about your levels if I don't eat something, but it usually only takes a little bit to stop the rise (as long as I eat something more substantial in another hour).

Actually, I think you are doing very well. An average of 106 is nothing to be concerned about (does that include the morning rise with delayed eating?). Whether or not you can reach your goal of 83-90 average will depend a good deal on just how well your pancreas is working and your level of insulin resistance. Have you considered going and staying in ketosis in order to bypass insulin resistance? Just an idea. (Requires eating a lot of fat and keeping carbs very low and protein moderate.)

neohdiver 03-17-2016 15:23

Quote:

Originally Posted by glwilso8 (Post 1095634)
my morning bs is mostly 100 to 110- i usually don't eat until 12 or 2pm but my bs rides up unbidden (consciously) to 115 124 with nothing to eat. could this be the liver anticipating a need level or perhaps the protein digestion delay from eating before bedtime say 12 to 2am? will or should eliminating more body fat help to bring those levels down?

I'm currently wrestling with this. I had predicted an A1C of 5.3, based on an average of 400+ readings, many of which were taken when I was intentionally seeking the top of the spike. I really thought it was an overestimate. So, even though my 5.7 A1c is quite respectable for a first A1c after diagnosis, it was personally disappointing.

I believe the hole I'm trying to plug occurs between waking up (when I am routinely between 72 and 90), and noon-ish (when I'm usually right around 100). The few random readings I've taken during that time rival my highest post-eating BG. So my testing likely missed a significant chunk of time when my BG is higher than average because of the extended dawn phenomenon.

I can easily drop my BG by eating an ounce of cheese or almonds. Unfortunately, I have to take thyroid medication in the morning - and it can't be accompanied by food (and dairy has to be delayed for 4 hours). I've started taking my thyroid meds whenever I wake up momentarily after 4 AM - so when I really wake up I can eat almost immediately. My next step is a combination of testing periodically every morning to confirm my suspicion AND eating almonds or cheese very shortly after I wake up to stop the glucose dump from the liver.

As for the impact of weight - even though I am actively losing weight, I don't expect that to have any impact on my blood glucose control. Long strong family history of diabetes completely independent from weight/activity levels. So far, at 44 lbs down, my expectations are being confirmed. (Rats.:rolleyes:)

(For some people there seems to be a strong connection between weight and BG levels - and if you're overweight it never hurts to lose weight. But losing weight would not be my first line approach for BG control.)

glwilso8 03-17-2016 16:50

yeah, i'm a shift worker, talk about a monkey wrench! the bs reading related to a short strenuous workout bumping my resistance level up. i'm trying to determine if these things relate to a biological cycle and/or a conditioned body response. i feel, right or wrong, that my glucose levels ride at a certain level based on what my body has been conditioned to. when i first went to radical dietary change just bs levels of 120, 130 felt like i was taking doses of cold medicine. like i imagine withdrawals feel like. in 10 weeks i'm down 29 lbs so i know in my semi-fasting state from not knowing what to eat and being cautious of all things, i burned a lot of fat. i'm trying to do a controlled spiral to my optimum weight. i'm speculating that my bs should maintain in the normal range at that point. i walk about 6hrs/night ride my recumbent every other day and got back to strength training every other day. my understanding to date is that these things are supposed to help the cumbersome issue of insulin resistance. i rather suspect that i have been in ketosis along the way but i don't understand it and need good information diet wise without picking needles out of haystacks. salads, meat, cheese, eggs are about my diet. my posted averages are overall bs. thank you for your interest.

glwilso8 03-17-2016 17:09

i'm figuring that lower body fat means having achieved more insulin available for proper blood function. one good note: i haven't been going over 140.

VeeJay 03-17-2016 17:54

Here's a good resource - Ketogenic Diet Resource

Among many other issues, discusses the science of glucose metabolism and what happens when one is in ketosis - fat-burning mode.

glwilso8 03-17-2016 18:53

got the ebook will give it a study.

Lawrence D 03-17-2016 20:14

Quote:

Originally Posted by glwilso8 (Post 1095898)
. . . i'm trying to determine if these things relate to a biological cycle and/or a conditioned body response. i feel, right or wrong, that my glucose levels ride at a certain level based on what my body has been conditioned to. . . .

I would say that it is conditioned response. I was an athlete in my younger days and still lift weights. My levels go up after a session at the gym or even after a half hour walk; it's the body "fueling up" because over the past several decades, that's what it needed.

It comes back down, but it is a nuisance.

div2live 03-17-2016 20:28

I think the key is how high you spike your blood from exercise. If you are finding you go over 140 cut back on the intensity and/or time of your workouts. In time as you body gets better conditioned, you will be able to increase both intensity and length of time.

Another case of test with your meter to find what you individually are able to tolerate without damaging yourself over the long run. Jay Cutler the quarterback for Chicago and Denver before that is a type 1 diabetic. Yet he has conditioned himself to a point where he can stay in safe control of his BS levels.


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