We should all fight to keep insulin and syringes OTC

Go Back   The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online > Diabetes Forum Community > Diabetes

Diabetes This section of the forum can be used to discuss anything and everything to do with Diabetes. Please use this general Diabetes section for any comments or discussions that don't fit into the more specific forum categories below. Please also ensure that all posts and threads are on topic, about Diabetes.


Like Tree5Likes

We should all fight to keep insulin and syringes OTC


Closed Thread
 
Shared Thread Thread Tools
Old 07-04-2018, 15:44   #1
No Longer Here
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Florida
Posts: 135

Member Type
Type 1
Diagnosed in 2018

35 likes received
11 likes given
Default We should all fight to keep insulin and syringes OTC

Again everyone happy 4th of July, Independence Day. That is what this post is about, independence.

What scary is as a newbee I feel type 1 has taken some of my independence.

I just think we should all fight to keep insulin and needles over the counter cause the fact that I will die without that stuff makes it feel really coercive to show ID to get needles and to go into my money to pay for doctors appointments. I will be going to doctors, but I would rather do so voluntarily then under death threats.


Some of my family didn't get why I got so upset with these pharmacy's profiling me as an addict CVS and then Walgreens (go and get your ID)

What these pharmacy's were really saying is you will be submissive and our subordinate or we will let you die.

I would rather die on my feet so to say then to live on my knees.


John Stuart Mill, "On Liberty", 1859:

The only purpose for which power can be rightly exercised over any member of the community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others. His own good, either physical or moral, is not sufficient warrant... Each person is the proper guardian of his own health.

The eminent theologian C. S. Lewis wrote:

Of all tyrannies, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end, for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.

Squawkx and IgotT1 like this.

Last edited by T12018; 07-04-2018 at 15:49.
T12018 is offline  
Old 07-04-2018, 16:44   #2
Moderator
 
itissteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Minnesota, USA
Posts: 1,518

Member Type
Type 2
Diagnosed in 2011

1146 likes received
468 likes given
Default

Trying not to drift into a political debate (it's OT), but the trouble is that not-well-meaning people have co-opted ordinary materials some of us need to live healthy lives -- and some organizations have reacted to it in a way that has unintended consequences.

Ever notice that you can't just pick up Sudafed (brand-name or generic) from the shelf anymore? It's behind the counter, too, and requires ID and a note on some Permanent Record somewhere that you bought it (and how much of it you bought) because too many people were buying it to make meth. A flippin' decongestant, now under lock and key because too many misused it.

It seems it is no different with syringes at some pharmacies. Those stores have decided that too many of their customers are (or could be) using syringes for non-legitimate-medical purposes and so they have restricted their availability. It's not a law (yet) but it's a rule.

They believe they're serving the greater good. I'm not defending the policy one way or the other; just noting an alternative view of it.

Ultimately, if we want to preserve our independence, we do it best by being independent. If I had a deathly peanut allergy, I'd likely appreciate that federal law requires that foods be labeled for the presence of peanuts. But it's on me to make sure I'm carrying an EpiPen just in case someone screwed up. Similarly, if I'm going to die without a shot of insulin, best believe I'll do my darndest to never be in the situation where I need to find a syringe. Living life on the edge can be exhilirating, but not if it's truly life-or-death. I'll know where my extras are, even if it's down to one.

mbuster likes this.
__________________
Now with less sugar!

A1c 10-30-2018 still 5.6 with no meds. Thank you LCHF!
itissteve is online now  
Old 07-07-2018, 17:16   #3
Senior Member
 
etherea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Central Arkansas USA
Posts: 2,917

Member Type
Type 2
Diagnosed in 2011

2077 likes received
3157 likes given
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by itissteve View Post
Ever notice that you can't just pick up Sudafed (brand-name or generic) from the shelf anymore? It's behind the counter, too, and requires ID and a note on some Permanent Record somewhere that you bought it (and how much of it you bought) because too many people were buying it to make meth. A flippin' decongestant, now under lock and key because too many misused it.
I hate having to sign for Sudafed! I'm also old enough to remember being able to sign for codeine cough syrup at the pharmacy.

__________________

View etherea's full Diabetes Forum profile here.
etherea is offline  
 
Old 07-08-2018, 00:09   #4
No Longer Here
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Florida
Posts: 135

Member Type
Type 1
Diagnosed in 2018

35 likes received
11 likes given
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by etherea View Post
I hate having to sign for Sudafed! I'm also old enough to remember being able to sign for codeine cough syrup at the pharmacy.
"So, the government took Sudafed off the shelves, meth synthesis became even more efficient, and people sneeze more. SOSDD.

All this accomplished was to inconvenience allergy sufferers and (and predictably) prompt chemists to come up with a better method for making the drug. (See: Why Sudafed Is Behind The Counter: A Meth Chemistry Lesson.) https://www.acsh.org/news/2017/09/12...y-lesson-11812

This website also has tons of diabetes articles https://www.acsh.org/search?search_a...ltext=diabetes


Last edited by T12018; 07-08-2018 at 00:12.
T12018 is offline  
Old 07-08-2018, 06:39   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: California, USA
Posts: 3,076

Member Type
Type 2
Diagnosed in 2009

4566 likes received
542 likes given
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by itissteve View Post
Trying not to drift into a political debate (it's OT), but the trouble is that not-well-meaning people have co-opted ordinary materials some of us need to live healthy lives -- and some organizations have reacted to it in a way that has unintended consequences.

Ever notice that you can't just pick up Sudafed (brand-name or generic) from the shelf anymore? It's behind the counter, too, and requires ID and a note on some Permanent Record somewhere that you bought it (and how much of it you bought) because too many people were buying it to make meth. A flippin' decongestant, now under lock and key because too many misused it.

It seems it is no different with syringes at some pharmacies. Those stores have decided that too many of their customers are (or could be) using syringes for non-legitimate-medical purposes and so they have restricted their availability. It's not a law (yet) but it's a rule.

They believe they're serving the greater good. I'm not defending the policy one way or the other; just noting an alternative view of it.

Ultimately, if we want to preserve our independence, we do it best by being independent. If I had a deathly peanut allergy, I'd likely appreciate that federal law requires that foods be labeled for the presence of peanuts. But it's on me to make sure I'm carrying an EpiPen just in case someone screwed up. Similarly, if I'm going to die without a shot of insulin, best believe I'll do my darndest to never be in the situation where I need to find a syringe. Living life on the edge can be exhilirating, but not if it's truly life-or-death. I'll know where my extras are, even if it's down to one.
Unfortunately, even in their do-gooding, they are dead wrong! Does anyone believe that restricting the sale of syringes will stop a heroin-addicted individual from getting a fix?! That is brain-dead stupid. What it WILL do is greatly increase the re-use and SHARING of those needles, literally KILLING many addicts with hepatitis, AIDS and other problems. The OPs description of those policing you "for your own good" was spot on. This is one of the clearest examples out there. Murder by meddling. That's even above the harm and insult to insulin-dependent diabetics.

__________________
Salim Morgan, T2
66 Years
DX: 9/2009 A1C=10.7
A1C 2/2010: 6.7 (DX + 4 months)
A1C 5/2010: 6.0 (DX + 8 months)
A1C 8/2010: 5.7 (DX + 11 months)
A1C 11/2010: 5.1 (DX + 14 months)
A1C 9/2011: 5.6 (DX + 2 years)
A1C 7/2012: 5.5 (DX + 2 years 10 months)
A1C 1/2019: 5.5
Diet: Approximately C:10;P:15;F:75 (as % calories)
Exercise: Not much. Stairs at home & work.
NO MEDS, No Highs, No Lows
Grandkids: 22
smorgan is offline  
Old 07-08-2018, 14:10   #6
Moderator
 
itissteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Minnesota, USA
Posts: 1,518

Member Type
Type 2
Diagnosed in 2011

1146 likes received
468 likes given
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by smorgan View Post
Unfortunately, even in their do-gooding, they are dead wrong!
I'm not here to discuss right or wrong. What one person sees as unproductive "meddling", another person sees as productive "not enabling". That behavior is seen in myriad forms throughout the pharmacy, such as in the availabiity of and willingness to dispense forms of birth control (and, at CVS in particular, their decision to not sell tobacco products -- a totally legal product -- at all). But starting a discussion here on what's behind those policies is off-topic.

Personally, I don't understand why syringes are not considered an "automatic" part of an insulin (or any other injectable) Rx. The insulin is pretty near useless unless it gets out of the vial and into the body.

My purpose in the post you quoted, though, was to illustrate that there is more than one point of view to this issue; more than one choice that can be made in a free country, for reasons that vary from excellent to "dead wrong" depending on where one sits.

__________________
Now with less sugar!

A1c 10-30-2018 still 5.6 with no meds. Thank you LCHF!
itissteve is online now  
Old 07-08-2018, 19:44   #7
No Longer Here
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Florida
Posts: 135

Member Type
Type 1
Diagnosed in 2018

35 likes received
11 likes given
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by smorgan View Post
Unfortunately, even in their do-gooding, they are dead wrong! Does anyone believe that restricting the sale of syringes will stop a heroin-addicted individual from getting a fix?! That is brain-dead stupid. What it WILL do is greatly increase the re-use and SHARING of those needles, literally KILLING many addicts with hepatitis, AIDS and other problems. The OPs description of those policing you "for your own good" was spot on. This is one of the clearest examples out there. Murder by meddling. That's even above the harm and insult to insulin-dependent diabetics.
How much is hep C treatment with insurance?
Unlike previous treatments, these drugs can cure HCV. For example, Harvoni is up to 100 percent effective at clearing the virus. These medications can carry a hefty price tag. For example, a typical 12-week course of Sovaldi can cost up to $84,000.


The average annual cost of HIV care in the ART era was estimated to be $19,912 (in 2006 dollars; $23,000 in 2010 dollars). The most recent published estimate of lifetime HIV treatment costs was $367,134 (in 2009 dollars; $379,668 in 2010 dollars)

Spreading HIV and Hep C only makes them more money and don't think for a second they care about anything else. Corporate psychos can't, getting angry at psychos for not caring is about as productive as getting angry at a deaf person for not listening to you.

Research conducted by forensic psychologist Nathan Brooks from Bond University found 21 per cent of 261 corporated professionals had clinically significant psychopathic traits. www.google.com/search?q=corporate+psychopath


Last edited by T12018; 07-08-2018 at 19:46.
T12018 is offline  
Old 07-09-2018, 02:58   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: MA, USA
Posts: 1,489

Member Type
Type 2
Diagnosed in 1986

903 likes received
941 likes given
Default

My insurance covers prescriptions it does NOT cover OTC.

__________________
I am not a doctor this is what works for me
You results may differ
diabetes86 is offline  
Old 07-09-2018, 15:03   #9
No Longer Here
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Florida
Posts: 135

Member Type
Type 1
Diagnosed in 2018

35 likes received
11 likes given
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by diabetes86 View Post
My insurance covers prescriptions it does NOT cover OTC.



Was Google reading my mind ?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	insurance dictate.jpg
Views:	38
Size:	29.7 KB
ID:	11609  

Attached Images
 


Last edited by T12018; 07-09-2018 at 15:06.
T12018 is offline  
Old 07-09-2018, 16:00   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: California, USA
Posts: 3,076

Member Type
Type 2
Diagnosed in 2009

4566 likes received
542 likes given
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by itissteve View Post
I'm not here to discuss right or wrong. What one person sees as unproductive "meddling", another person sees as productive "not enabling". That behavior is seen in myriad forms throughout the pharmacy, such as in the availabiity of and willingness to dispense forms of birth control (and, at CVS in particular, their decision to not sell tobacco products -- a totally legal product -- at all). But starting a discussion here on what's behind those policies is off-topic.

Personally, I don't understand why syringes are not considered an "automatic" part of an insulin (or any other injectable) Rx. The insulin is pretty near useless unless it gets out of the vial and into the body.

My purpose in the post you quoted, though, was to illustrate that there is more than one point of view to this issue; more than one choice that can be made in a free country, for reasons that vary from excellent to "dead wrong" depending on where one sits.
My point was much simpler. If it is an attempt to "not enable" drug use, it is a failure. Drug use is unaffected, AIDS and hepatitis increase. It seriously HURTS the vary people it was meant to help. Forcing addicts to share and re-use syringes is not good for anyone or anything. And, the point of this thread, is a negative for T1s.

__________________
Salim Morgan, T2
66 Years
DX: 9/2009 A1C=10.7
A1C 2/2010: 6.7 (DX + 4 months)
A1C 5/2010: 6.0 (DX + 8 months)
A1C 8/2010: 5.7 (DX + 11 months)
A1C 11/2010: 5.1 (DX + 14 months)
A1C 9/2011: 5.6 (DX + 2 years)
A1C 7/2012: 5.5 (DX + 2 years 10 months)
A1C 1/2019: 5.5
Diet: Approximately C:10;P:15;F:75 (as % calories)
Exercise: Not much. Stairs at home & work.
NO MEDS, No Highs, No Lows
Grandkids: 22
smorgan is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
what do you do about OTC med like cough drops? Sholleman Diabetes 3 10-11-2016 20:51
We keep saying LCHF is for all of us! Shanny Diabetes Treatment 1 06-16-2015 23:20
Fight diabetes, fight everything SamWright Diabetes Complications 2 09-27-2012 07:46
OTC Protein in Urine Test magicplinger Diabetes 0 10-20-2011 01:00
OTC allergy meds Carolina Diabetes 13 09-29-2011 09:44

LEGAL NOTICE
By using this Website, you agree to abide by our Terms and Conditions (the "Terms"). This notice does not replace our Terms, which you must read in full as they contain important information. You must not post any defamatory, unlawful or undesirable content, or any content copied from a third party, on the Website. You must not copy material from the Website except in accordance with the Terms. This Website gives users an opportunity to share information only and is not intended to contain any advice which you should rely upon. It does not replace the need to take professional or other advice. We have no liability to you or any other person in respect of any content on this Website.


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 19:16.




Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.