Intermittent fasting results after 12 weeks - Page 3

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Intermittent fasting results after 12 weeks - Page 3


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Old 02-24-2020, 23:46   #21
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That's great news Pat! Looking forward to hearing how things go. Thanks for sharing this.

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Old 02-25-2020, 01:46   #22
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Originally Posted by patpuckett View Post
I was growing increasingly frustrated with a small increase in my A1c with each test. My doctor's response was to drop my metformin to 500 mg/day since his goal for me was to eventually reach 7. He retired and my new doctor wanted me to drop the met as an experiment. I understand that met doesn't greatly influence bg levels, but I began seeing readings not seen for years. A 180 range was not uncommon. My last A1c was 5.8 and this is what they wanted higher.

I started serious IF about a week ago. My longest fast was 30 hours. Now my numbers have come back down and I'm seeing under 100 during the day with 115 - 125 in the mornings. This is where I want to be and I'll continue to fast to keep me in "my happy place."
Good for you patpuckett. We are all rooting for you.

I don't understand why a doctor's A1c goal for his patient to be way above normal. I can see a goal expectation being a little out of normal range, especially knowing that many will not be able to stick to a tight plan of control. Not because the patient can't or doesn't want to, but because they don't realize the seriousness, and most likely their doctor doesn't either.

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Think I've had this since 2003. Told I was Type 2 lean on 2/13/12.
a1c 8.8 (8/2011) 5.2 (07/2019)
TC 183 LDL 102 HDL 65 TG 52 (02/20/2020)
Supplemental vitamins and electrolytes
64 YY Love the LCHF diet. The cheese goes well with my whine

updated 02//20
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Old 02-25-2020, 02:56   #23
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I don't understand why a doctor's A1c goal for his patient to be way above normal.
A doctor friend of mine, who has been a GP for 30 years, told me "they" like to keep diabetic A1cs near 7 to lower the probability of going hypo. This same person, when I first told him I was going low-carb/no meds to address my diabetes, said that would be dangerous because it might lead to ketoacidosis.

I like the guy a lot as a friend. But he's seriously behind on the research. Fortunately he's not my GP.

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Old 02-25-2020, 12:05   #24
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Good for you patpuckett. We are all rooting for you.

I don't understand why a doctor's A1c goal for his patient to be way above normal. I can see a goal expectation being a little out of normal range, especially knowing that many will not be able to stick to a tight plan of control. Not because the patient can't or doesn't want to, but because they don't realize the seriousness, and most likely their doctor doesn't either.
Itissteve responded with the way doctors think. They fear lows and follow the ADA guidelines although those guidelines have been revised to allow for reduced carbs.

I'm a senior and the thinking is that I will have passed before serious complications arise. My ophthalmologist, however, supports my quest for lower bg levels.

Thank you for rooting for me. It's encouraging me to stay on track.

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Old 02-26-2020, 03:12   #25
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The best talk I've had with a doctor about diabetes was with my eye doctor. They must know something the rest don't.

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Think I've had this since 2003. Told I was Type 2 lean on 2/13/12.
a1c 8.8 (8/2011) 5.2 (07/2019)
TC 183 LDL 102 HDL 65 TG 52 (02/20/2020)
Supplemental vitamins and electrolytes
64 YY Love the LCHF diet. The cheese goes well with my whine

updated 02//20
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Old 03-26-2020, 06:21   #26
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Default Wait a minute - Hey, that's me!

Team,

Hat tip to a poster on YouTube: Q: Why is fasting such a taboo in the western world? A: Because there's no money in it.

I looked up a sobering fact. The ADA estimates the total cost of managing diabetes in America is 245 Billion US Dollars...uh, what? That's 1.5% of our entire GDP. For just one health problem?

The problem here is obvious. I must be lying.

Guess what? I am! That was 2012 numbers. It has skyrocketed to 327 Billion in 2017 (source: ADA), the last time this was measured. That's an eye-popping 34% increase. I say we're going in the wrong direction in a big, big way.

My opinion on this - like many things the health industry and our governments tell us, the truth is exactly the opposite. With utter certainty and sincerity, our leadership has told us many lies - the two biggest that affects us diabetics are these two whoppers:

-The food pyramid is the gold standard of how you should eat (USDA 1992, updated in 2015 to say that fats and sugars are empty calories)
-The best way to lose weight is a high carb low fat diet. (Anywhere)

I see. So, I should have up to eleven servings of bread and pasta? Limited amounts of cheese, meat, chicken, eggs, and nuts? And, uh, "sparingly" amounts of oils and fat? OK for the sake of intellectual honesty I agree with the sparingly label for sweets but maybe no sweets is a better label. And they expect us to not question them or their motives?

I feel my BG rise just reading that twaddle. Let's move on.

I'm reflecting back to the point where the light bulb went off for me (Jason Fung videos), nine months ago. In the beginning, my doctor, my family, all the medical publications (and boy there are hundreds of them) all had me convinced I had a disease that would most likely shorten my life and certainly make me more sick as time wore on. Everyone who cared about me, the medical establishment, my friends and family said get used to it. I was looking at the barrel end of a condition that could not be controlled except with drugs, and even those would be needed in ever increasing quantities to stay "normal". In the face of that, who am I, or anyone, to argue? The entire universe of knowledge was in virtually total agreement - they can help with lots of expensive drugs, but get used to it. My own doctor told me there is no cure. She could only manage my condition.

She prescribed the DASH diet which, upon scrutiny, is the same USDA food pyramid with lots of high fructose fruits thrown in for good measure. No thanks.

When I was young, my dad was already pretty overweight. We visited my Grandma and Grandpa pretty regularly in those days. Gramps had emigrated from Ireland as a young man and so had an endearing accent even after decades in the US. When he was drinking his Michelob that Irish accent would explode. It was the funniest thing to a kid like me. My job on those visits was to bring beers from the ice filled garbage can in the back yard to the adults at the card table. Let me tell you I was a busy boy. I got to hear very risqué things to a lad my age so I didn’t mind. On one visit after one too many beers Gramps decided to lay into my dad (I’m paraphrasing mind you. The intent is dead on but the exact words are lost 50 years ago). Out of nowhere:

“Hey, you’re fat!”

We were all stunned for a second. We all then burst out laughing, except for my dad. I’ve seen that look on his face. Like I was going to get spanked yet again for punching my brother.

“I know how to fix that! I have the best way, the best advice for ‘ya”!

Gramps stood up from the gin rummy table and then let out one of his famous patented belches. You know what I’m talking about, the kind of bodily emissions you measure on the Richter scale. Now, nothing is funnier to a kid than an adult letting go with some gas. Evidently with adults it is hilarious too because everyone was roaring with laughter.

“Here’s the secret…stop stickin’ the d*mn fork in your mouth!”

Absolute pandemonium. It was as if we had just heard the funniest thing in our lifetimes. The whole evening we were all giggling on and off. I feel bad for my dad now, but at the time it was as cracking as if your parents just surprised you with a summer trip to Disneyland.

I swear the late comedian John Pinette was in the gin rummy room because he’s got a bit that swindles my Gramps to the T.

I invite you to listen to Gramps wisdom. With IF this not just possible, but easy.

They say losing weight is hard. They say conquering diabetes is impossible. The medical establishment, they say so. Your family, they say so.

They are all wrong.

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Old 03-26-2020, 13:17   #27
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Thanks, Mike. The medical system offering standard-of-care treatment for diabetes does appear to be way off the mark. Unfortunately, there are many contributing factors to not changing minds more quickly.

The first is the medical establishment itself, which moves very slowly. It does seem sometimes that the system of continual treatment and ever-more meds is self-perpetuating and it's fair to wonder about that. I will note that, in the last few years, the head of the ADA herself has admitted she follows a low-carb eating plan. The tide is turning, but very slowly.

The rest of it -- the food pyramid, agricultural policy, the environment built around having food available in many forms all the time -- that's an entrenched environment, too.

And, dang it, carbs taste good! Humans have an innate preference for sweet foods over bitter ones (this is different in Asia, but not in North America, which suggests a cultural preference). Entire industries have been built around snacking rather than eating just a few (or even one!) meal a day.

I disagree that losing weight isn't hard. It's certainly easier to gain weight than lose it. Losing weight means not eating in an environment that puts an emphasis on eating, celebrates eating, and makes eating really easy to do, anytime, anywhere. Not everyone has the discipline you've displayed to eat only healthful foods at only certain times of day.

Maybe someday the preponderance of evidence will prove that your approach is the approach. In the meantime, though, I'll accept that there are several good roads to the same end and take progress in those directions as good.

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Old 05-25-2020, 05:49   #28
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Team,

I'm working on a final post to this thread. I started this IF process right around the beginning of June last year. It seems proper to bring closure to this at the one year mark.

A lot has happened. A lot.

I am, quite unexpectedly, playing on a much bigger playing field than I imagined when I started this thread. I will explain in my last post as I am able.

Peace and long life,

MikeVan

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