The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online

The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online (https://www.diabetesforum.com/forum.php)
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Romance 01-05-2014 20:47

Introduction
 
Hi, my screen name is Romance (an anagram of my real name), and I do not have diabetes, though everyone else in my family has type 2 diabetes and high BMI, as well. I believe Iíve avoided it by regular exercise, avoiding sweets (sodas and sweetened drinks especially), portion control, and adoption of a reasonable, balanced diet. I avoid foods with a high glycemic load (mainly processed starches), and mainly adhere to the Harvard University balanced food plate and pyramid (not the USDA pyramid). At age 58, I am much healthier than my friends who insist on a LCHF diet, and I find it easier to stick to mine.

I changed my food habits in 2003, and Iím very happy with the wide variety of foods I eat; Iím not ON a diet, I maintain a healthy diet. I think glycemic load is far more important than glycemic index, and the science agrees with me. However, I find that most people disagree, and wonder why.

VeeJay 01-05-2014 21:51

What is the definition of glycemic load, as opposed to GI.

If by glycemic load you mean total amount of glucose ingested at a given time, then I would agree that it is important. Isn't that what we are figuring when we count carbs?

VeeJay 01-05-2014 21:53

Also, I'm curious why you have joined a diabetes forum when you don't have diabetes. I'm not being critical, just curious.

Romance 01-05-2014 21:59

Quote:

Originally Posted by VeeJay (Post 357714)
Also, I'm curious why you have joined a diabetes forum when you don't have diabetes. I'm not being critical, just curious.

Because Iím interested in diet, and want to avoid diabetes at all costs; everyone else in my family has/had it; my mother died from complications.

VeeJay 01-05-2014 22:02

Then I suggest you explore the low-carb/high-fat diet that helps so many people who have difficulty metabolizing carbohydrates.

Romance 01-05-2014 22:05

Quote:

Originally Posted by VeeJay (Post 357706)
What is the definition of glycemic load, as opposed to GI.

If by glycemic load you mean total amount of glucose ingested at a given time, then I would agree that it is important. Isn't that what we are figuring when we count carbs?

Glycemic load estimates the amount oneís blood sugar is raised by eating a serving of that food; this can differ substantially from the glycemic index. Potatoes have a high GI, and a high GL, whereas carrots have a medium GI, but a very low glycemic load.

VeeJay 01-05-2014 22:19

Those of us with diabetes use our meters to measure the rise in BG. It is more accurate than an estimate.

I can understand why someone who has no need yet to test BG would need to use an estimate as a guide. But you're going to find that most of the members on this forum use their meter for this purpose.

moon 01-05-2014 23:30

I'm having trouble comparing my diet as a diabetic with high insulin resistance, to one of someone without diabetes who wants to avoid it.

The issue of diabetes prevention isn't something we discuss a lot here because, well, the horse is already out of the barn. And apart from an extreme low-carb diet, I don't see how diet could prevent diabetes. Even not smoking can't prevent lung cancer, though it gives one a much better chance!

So - your issues would be different from ours, and surely you have many more choices with your diet than I have with mine if I want to manage my diabetes in the healthiest way possible.

Gizmo 01-06-2014 00:53

Sometimes when I read a post, it brings something else to mind that I feel like I should throw into the mix, and this is one of those times.

Everyone in my immediate family has type 2 except my daughter. She is a teacher and sometimes asks the school nurse to test her fasting bg. The last two times she tested, it was 92. I'm a little concerned about that because the blood sugar 101 website, which is a very reliable source of information says this:

What is a Normal Blood Sugar?

"several studies suggest that people whose fasting blood sugar is over 92 mg/dl (5.1 mmol/L) are more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes over the next decade."

Of course my daughter is in the 'safe' zone, but just barely. The just barely part is what is worrisome to me.

Thought I'd mention this because since there is so much type 2 in your family, you might want to borrow a meter occasionally and test your fasting bg.

P.S. fellow members: yes, I know meters aren't that accurate.

VeeJay 01-06-2014 13:56

Romance,

You seem to be a caring person. I was going to suggest you read Blood Sugar 101 with the idea that you will gain a better understanding of diabetes control. If your diabetic relatives are open to learning a better way to control their diabetes, a way that will ensure a more healthy life, free from diabetes complications, they would be quite fortunate to have you help them. Even if you don't have diabetes yourself, you certainly can learn about it, and about using one's meter to test, rather than rely on some formula without checking the results.


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