Diabetic and Determined

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Diabetic and Determined


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Old 08-08-2014, 03:41   #1
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Diagnosed in 2014

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Default Diabetic and Determined

Hello everyone! I'm glad I found this site!

I am 21, type 1, and recently got diagnosed June 2014.

It's been a pretty rough past two months. I basically found out I was diabetic on accident through an ER visit for psychiatric reasons which basically turned into an ICU visit since I had ketoacidosis. After a three day stay I was then transferred to the psychiatric hospital for 7 days for my original concern.

Since then I have had a second stay in a psychiatric hospital two days, had my appendix removed, quit my psychiatric medications, quit smoking, been on disability, minimized my drinking habits, quit a lot of my favorite regular foods, and started back on insulin injections after 3 weeks of being bad.

Two days in a row I have had two injections that were particularly painful. I know...I'm a baby. But I'm just so damn sensitive to these injections 25% of the time. Because of that, I decided to look up the insulin pens and insulin pumps to see if they were a better alternative but I don't think neither are better for me in the terms of "I'm tired of sticking myself with needles!" So that depressed me. On top of that, I'm already tired of injections, tired of craving my favorite foods, and tired of the sugar drops, and tired of testing and being upset by a high sugar score. I know, I'm just being a little baby, but this **** is hard for me. Food was my life. I baked, I bought, I ate, and all in surplus. So I guess I would have gotten type 2 anyways eventually since many in my family have it.

So I just recently had a little triggering panic attack and was feeling real low but I'm not going to let diabetes mess things up for me even if it means 4-6 tests a day and 3-4 injections a day. I'll make it work for me, it's going to be my source of weight loss and fitness success. The "walk for the cure" run for diabetes is next month and I'm going to go. I'm going to suck it up and take my last injection tonight. I'm going to be strong now for others who will be in the same whole later. What good is it if I give up now, eat what I want, stop exercising smoke all I want, numb out with alcohol, and give up injections? Lost feet? Lost hands? Lost vision? High blood pressure?

Sure, this may inevitably happen, but in the mean time, though I am only a newbie, I'll punch back and help myself as well as anywhere I can with the diabetic community, and as much as I can. Time to just flow with the punches. Diabetes is what I have, diabetic is what I am. There's no other way around this issue.

In the mean time I will pretend my glucometer is a reader for midichlorians (star wars), the lower it is, the more of a Jedi I am.

And for the injections? I can just call myself Captain America as it is my Super Soldier Serum. Who doesn't want to be Captain America?

Anyways, just some goofy positivist for my angst. haha.

With Gratitude,
Q1C

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Old 08-08-2014, 03:46   #2
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hole** positivism**

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Old 08-08-2014, 06:03   #3
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Determination is a key requirement for handling this. In my experience I found pens easier than syringes as it doesn't really feel like an injection. I am now on a pump but to benefit from a pump you need a bit of experience, the ability to count carbs accurately and a lot of patience!

Maybe read using insulin by John Walsh. I like to eat lower carb because lower carb means lower insulin which leaves a smaller margin for error. I always eat less than 100grams a day sometimes only 80. Many people on here eat way less than that, successfully. Smaller amounts of insulin lead to fewer hypos. Dr Richard Bernstein calls it "the law of small numbers".

Good luck, you can do it.

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Old 08-08-2014, 07:06   #4
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Determination and as an extension control is the key. You are quite +ve in your approach as is obvious. One of our members (Richard157) has been a T1 for 68 years. Maybe you can draw some inspiration from him. We all do.

__________________
A1c ~ 5.4
Follow LC/HF diet since Aug 2010
Control only with diet/exercise. No meds.

Blog - Metabolically Challenged

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Old 08-08-2014, 23:36   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hillary View Post
Determination is a key requirement for handling this. In my experience I found pens easier than syringes as it doesn't really feel like an injection. I am now on a pump but to benefit from a pump you need a bit of experience, the ability to count carbs accurately and a lot of patience!

Maybe read using insulin by John Walsh. I like to eat lower carb because lower carb means lower insulin which leaves a smaller margin for error. I always eat less than 100grams a day sometimes only 80. Many people on here eat way less than that, successfully. Smaller amounts of insulin lead to fewer hypos. Dr Richard Bernstein calls it "the law of small numbers".

Good luck, you can do it.
Thank you so much for your kind encouragement and guidance.

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Old 08-08-2014, 23:37   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skb View Post
Determination and as an extension control is the key. You are quite +ve in your approach as is obvious. One of our members (Richard157) has been a T1 for 68 years. Maybe you can draw some inspiration from him. We all do.
Wow! I will be sure to look out for him on the forums! Thank you so much.

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Old 08-09-2014, 21:53   #7
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Hello Q1C, welcome! So you have needle phobia? Many people do, at first, but they adjust very well. I am using a pump and the needle on my infusion sets is only 6 mm long (a quarter inch). The needle is very thin, and I don't usually feel it when I push it in. An infusion set lasts three days for most people, so pushing the needle in occurs only once, every three days. It stays in my body all the time, but I never feel it. If you continue using injections, be sure to keep using different body parts, instead of using the same area too long. That can cause scar tissue and poor absorption of the insulin, which then causes high blood sugar.

Someone recommended the book "Using Insulin" by John Walsh. It is excellent and explains how to use carb counting to determine your insulin dosages. It also explains many other things, such as insulin sensitivity levels, so you will know how much to inject to correct a blood sugar high, without falling too low. Walsh also wrote the book "Pumping Insulin".

Newly diagnosed type 1 people are typically having long healthy lives in the US. Their life expectancy is almost as good as it is for non diabetics. I was diagnosed in 1945, when I was 6. After 68 years of type 1, I do not have any diabetes related complications, except for some mild nerve damage. I use tight control, and test at least 12 times per day.

Let us know how you are doing as you continue developing your diabetes management routine.

__________________
I have been Type 1 for 73 years. My A1c is 6.2. I pump with the MM 630, and I am using the Dexcom G5.
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Old 08-09-2014, 22:40   #8
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Richard, thank you so much for your thoughtful reply! I will certainly be taking it to use!

6mm? Wow! My needles are 8mm. I think I will ask my doctor the pump and bring it into consideration.

As for the books, I love to read so I hope to purchase them in the next month.

Your story is great! I hope to turn out the same way.
Looks like I must start testing a lot more.

Thank you!

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Old 08-09-2014, 22:48   #9
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You'll also need to consult your insurance provider relative to pumps and how much they'll pay for the initial purchase as well as supplies in the days to come.




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Old 08-09-2014, 23:01   #10
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Good point, I may not have been suggested pumps or pens because of insurance reasons. I'll send an email. Thanks

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