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PhoenixFire 12-23-2018 11:22

I'm new
 
Hi,
I signed up to this site a while ago, after being diagnoses as a prediabetic, but I didn't participate until right now. I was recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. I did my first test this morning with that finger pricking thing. I've also been taking Jardiance for a week. My number fasting number was 9.3. I'm going to poke my finger again in another 2 hours. I was wondering: What numbers are dangerous? Maybe I was typing the wrong thing, but I couldn't find the info on the all-knowing-all-seeing Goggle.

itissteve 12-23-2018 14:09

Hello, PhoenixFire! Welcome to the forum!

"What numbers are dangerous" is a question with several answers. :plain: What I can tell you is that people who don't have diabetes typically register a fasting blood glucose number between 5.0 and 5.5 (give or take a little)(90-100 mg/dl). The American Diabetes Association, which you would hope would have the latest and best information, states that a fasting blood glucose under 7.2 (130 mg/dl) is an optimal target. But many endocrinologists recommend lower numbers, stating that damage to the body occurs whenever blood glucose levels go over 7.8 (140 mg/dl); starting at 7.2 doesn't give you much room for an increase after eating. There also are studies that show that keeping blood glucose levels in a narrow range of values is healthier than having blood glucose levels that average out to the same number but do so with highs and lows that are more extreme.

Clear as mud, eh? :smile2: Lower is better, and as long as you don't go much below 4.4 (80 mg/dl) with medication you should be okay. (Keep in mind we're not doctors but we've done lots of research.)

Fortunately, there are many ways to bring down your fasting (and other) blood glucose levels. There's lots of good information here about how to do that (and why) so I'd suggest taking a little time and checking out the discussion areas here. There's a lot of experience and support from the other posters here. We all want to help.

mbuster 12-23-2018 16:48

Hi PhoenixFire, welcome to the forum.

Lots of testing when you are new is needed. Structured testing will give you lots of info, even some random testing may be useful. A testing protocol that we recommend here is Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG) - when you first get up; pre meal - right before you eat a meal/snack (FBG would be serve the purpose of before breakfast if you will eat soon after taking it); 1 hour post prandial (PP) - one hour after first bite of a meal; 2 hour PP - 2 hours after first bite. You do the pre meal test to know where you start so you can see the affect of the food you eat to your BG. The one hour is usually around the high peak in your BG after eating - this time can vary depending on several factors. The 2 hour test should show you are back down to about where you started - this could also vary depending on several factors. More on all that later. This much testing gives you a good idea of how the foods that you eat are affecting your BG. Carbohydrates are the major contributor of glucose from foods you eat. So if you get numbers higher than you want after meals, look at what you ate, and start reducing portion size of the stuff with carbs. It may be that it could be necessary to eliminate that food while getting your BG where you want it.

After a while, once you figure out what you can and can't eat and have your BG in control, less frequent testing is required. Maybe you can add back in later, some of the things you eliminated by playing around with portion sizes of them, testing will tell. I typically check my FBG most days and don't test around meal times unless I try a new food. I do test occasionally before and after intense exercise/activity.

Dangerous levels of BG?
*High blood glucose, Not sure if you can put a number on exactly what number is too high, but the biggest danger is ketoacidosis, a combination of high BG and high blood ketone levels. This is more likely with Type 1 diabetes, but can also happen in Type 2 if there isn't an insulin response to high BG. Values can vary, it depends on how low the pH of your blood gets. I personally am concerned if my BG goes above 7.8 mmol/L (140 mg/dL), because that is where studies indicate that damage is being done, its not life threatening, that is just my point of trying not to go higher than.
*Low blood glucose, not sure you can put a number on it either. The range where BG is typically defined as being hypoglycemic begins around 3.9 mmol/L (70 mg/dL). That BG level is not in itself dangerous, but the symptoms some may have as the BG drops may cause them issues where they could get light headed enough or even become unconscious and the result could cause harm. I have read that getting down below 1.6 mmol/L (below 30 as measured in mg/dL) could cause death due to the actual BG level.

I know this is a lot, but there is a lot more. Don't let it overwhelm you, it will all come together over time. Please do ask any questions you may have as they come up, someone here can assist with getting you an answer.

div2live 12-23-2018 19:41

PhoenixFire Welcome! You have just surrounded yourself with a very large group of fellow diabetics. Most of us have traveled down the road you are now on. We will share our actual experiences and tell you what works and does not work for each of us. This will help you gain insight and knowledge regarding this disease. Above, you have lots of basic information to get you going down a good road. Remember that knowledge is the most important thing for someone with diabetes.


Let me start out by talking a bit about the 'dreaded...'finger sticks'! Actually, there is a lot to know to limit the pain and to get the best drop of blood to get a good test result. I will focus on making them almost pain free, and then a bit about getting a 'good' sample, so you do not have to stick again to get a good sample.

Limiting Pain:Do not stick the tip of your fingers! Stick the sides of your fingers as there is many less nerves on the side of the finger.

Wash your hands in warm soapy water and dry with a clean towel. Do not use alcohol to prepare for a finger stick, as alcohol, in time, will toughen your skin, making it difficult to get a proper stick!


Most of us do our finger sticks using some form of a lancet holder (a small plastic devise that holds the lancet and pops out the needle for us to stick the finger) These devises also have some type of depth adjustment built into them. Start out with the lowest setting, usually #1. In most, this will produce enough blood for a good test, and since it is the shallowest stick you will minimize the potential for pain. Only increase the depth adjustment if you must. I have been a diabetic for over 15years and I still get good blood on a #1 setting.

Most of us do not change out our lancets until we feel the one we are using is a bit dull. Since you are the only one using the lancet, changing is not necessary unless you feel better about doing it.

Be advised that a new testing meter is out on the market now that eliminates the need to stick your finger. It has a patch that you put on your arm that allows the meter to read your blood sugar just by putting your meter up to the patch on your arm. I do not have one and I must rely on others to tell you more about this new product. I do know that some insurance companies are covering the cost on these new meters, but not all.

That's about all I have to offer right now, hope this helps you avoid pain and improve your testing protocol.

Good Luck and have a Merry Christmas

PhoenixFire 12-23-2018 20:14

@div2live I'm glad to hear that I don't have to throw out the lancet after one use. Thanks for all the great information. I have a Accu-chek equipment so it's too late to get the one with the patch. O well. It comes with a quick start guide and a more detailed user manual (which I should probably be reading but I was going to do that after Christmas because it's all getting overwhelming).

PhoenixFire 12-23-2018 20:17

Quote:

Originally Posted by mbuster (Post 1313817)
Dangerous levels of BG?
*High blood glucose, Not sure if you can put a number on exactly what number is too high, but the biggest danger is ketoacidosis, a combination of high BG and high blood ketone levels. This is more likely with Type 1 diabetes, but can also happen in Type 2 if there isn't an insulin response to high BG. Values can vary, it depends on how low the pH of your blood gets. I personally am concerned if my BG goes above 7.8 mmol/L (140 mg/dL), because that is where studies indicate that damage is being done, its not life threatening, that is just my point of trying not to go higher than.
*Low blood glucose, not sure you can put a number on it either. The range where BG is typically defined as being hypoglycemic begins around 3.9 mmol/L (70 mg/dL). That BG level is not in itself dangerous, but the symptoms some may have as the BG drops may cause them issues where they could get light headed enough or even become unconscious and the result could cause harm. I have read that getting down below 1.6 mmol/L (below 30 as measured in mg/dL) could cause death due to the actual BG level.

I know this is a lot, but there is a lot more. Don't let it overwhelm you, it will all come together over time. Please do ask any questions you may have as they come up, someone here can assist with getting you an answer.

Thanks for this information. I've gotten into the habit of eating big portions and lots of snacks but have recently cut out all junk food. I have a lot of work to do.

PhoenixFire 12-23-2018 20:19

@itissteve Thanks for the help. I'll try and get my number below 7.2. I've cut out all the junk food but still need to eat smaller portions and less carbs. Food is so important to me and this diagnosis really saddens me. I love great tasting food and lots of it. :)

itissteve 12-23-2018 20:31

Quote:

Originally Posted by PhoenixFire (Post 1313833)
I've cut out all the junk food but still need to eat smaller portions and less carbs. Food is so important to me and this diagnosis really saddens me. I love great tasting food and lots of it. :)

With you right there, PhoenixFire! I was a "foodie" before I finally took my diagnosis seriously and it took a little while to get adjusted to the New World Order, as it were. I'm largely back now, cooking some really great food, though there are days when I just don't feel like cooking. (OK, there were days like that before my diagnosis. :vs_blush:).

Anyway, I think you will adjust. You still can eat great tasting food so long as it's not sugary or really starchy. You might want to look around the Recipes forum here for some ideas.

PhoenixFire 12-23-2018 20:40

Quote:

Originally Posted by itissteve (Post 1313845)
With you right there, PhoenixFire! I was a "foodie" before I finally took my diagnosis seriously and it took a little while to get adjusted to the New World Order, as it were. I'm largely back now, cooking some really great food, though there are days when I just don't feel like cooking. (OK, there were days like that before my diagnosis. :vs_blush:).

Anyway, I think you will adjust. You still can eat great tasting food so long as it's not sugary or really starchy. You might want to look around the Recipes forum here for some ideas.

New World Order is a good term for it. Diabetes is my dictator. XD I did print off some good recipes I'll make soon.

itissteve 12-23-2018 21:04

Quote:

Originally Posted by PhoenixFire (Post 1313849)
Diabetes is my dictator.

Diabetes is a progressive condition and we ignore it to our own harm. But this site centers around the idea that we can manage our diabetes; it does not have to manage us.

Stick around; lots of us have been in your shoes. I know it seems like there's a lot to mind right now, but it does becomes more automatic -- and easier.


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