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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I've been aiming for the 5s in the past couple of weeks, so that I can get a good A1C when i visit my dr. in a few weeks. Is there a close correlation between the glucometer reading and the A1C?

It's been my experience that targeting an average in the 5s can be accomplished primarily by eating LESS, and I am glad that Metformin helps decrease appetite. I just hope that getting good numbers does not encourage my dr. to take me off Metformin.

So, is it true that your body is close to that of a non-diabetic if you are in the 4s?

Have a good day all,
 

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A normal non D has an HbA1c from 4.0-5.4 or there abouts. I try to keep my bgs as close to 100 as possible during the day. I never have low bgs but rarely have high bgs either. Consistency is the important thing. Also the important thing is where your bgs are when you are sleeping, since that is a significant part of your day. I use a chart to see where my average bgs are and how they correlate to HbA1c

Printable Diabetes Chart- Convert HbA1c to estimated Average Glucose(eAG)
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A normal non D has an HbA1c from 4.0-5.4 or there abouts. I try to keep my bgs as close to 100 as possible during the day. I never have low bgs but rarely have high bgs either. Consistency is the important thing. Also the important thing is where your bgs are when you are sleeping, since that is a significant part of your day. I use a chart to see where my average bgs are and how they correlate to HbA1c

Printable Diabetes Chart- Convert HbA1c to estimated Average Glucose(eAG)
Thank you for your reply jwags -- it's really encouraging because I am close to those targets. I find the 4s a little difficult.

I also use a "gadget" chart which unfortunately, lowers a 4.5 to 5, for example. But I do keep a diary so my glucometer shows all the averages.
As for sleeping numbers, I will have to start morning counts soon. Waking up at 3:00 a.m. in case of hypoglycemia is really disruptive so I do have a snack before eating, such as a small cup of yoghurt, or a corn on the cob, or some fruits and crackers.

Thank you again - isn't it great to be able to reach "normal" levels? Those Google images on long-term diabetes complications are a good incentive.
 

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Corn on the cob, crackers or fruit? Is this to counter lows? I can't imagine why you'd eat so many carbs otherwise. Seems like glucose tablets would be handier if that's it.
 

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My final authority is my meter. I care not to debate the issue; if my meter goes past 140 (7.7) after eating it, it goes on the black list. I WILL keep my bgl controlled regardless of what science has to say about the efficacy of keeping carbs in my diet, and most of those carbs have not cleared my meter test. I'm glad for you if you can eat 'em without spiking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My final authority is my meter. I care not to debate the issue; if my meter goes past 140 (7.7) after eating it, it goes on the black list. I WILL keep my bgl controlled regardless of what science has to say about the efficacy of keeping carbs in my diet, and most of those carbs have not cleared my meter test. I'm glad for you if you can eat 'em without spiking.
You can't deny accounting. But Shanny, those carb snacks I only take before sleeping because i have 8 hrs. of sleeping inactivity ahead and want to avoid hypoglycemia; the rest of my meals are a Canada Diabetes guide meals, and exercise, and the glyclazide and the Metformin. I think my statement was generalized. Yes, i agree with you-- i thinkk that the glucometer is analogous to a thermometer. We are so lucky to have it. In reading the history of diabetes i read that people used urine tests - that must have been so restricting in life activity.
 

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Have you actually had hypoglycemia? Note that it is clinically defined as BG less than 55 and with symptoms.

Eating carbs is not a way to avoid hypos. In an extreme situation, carbs can be used to get you OUT of a hypo condition but in general, carbs are what cause hypos, not prevent them.

Since as T2s we still have some insulin-producing capacity, hypos could occur in some of us (although they are extremely rare) by an over-reaction to ingested carbs where BG goes up from the carbs, the pancreas reacts with a little too much insulin and a low results.

The only other way to get a hypo is by simply starving (along with a metabolic disorder of hypoglycemia). That's why non-diabetic hypoglycemics have to eat every few hours - but they DON'T need to eat carbs. The less carbs they eat the fewer problems they will have. Carbs are what cause the violent swings.

So if you're one of those rare T2s who actually gets hypos, the solution is to eat less carbs all around and get more nutrition from fat and protein along with making sure that you eat ENOUGH to sustain yourself and aren't starving.


You can't deny accounting. But Shanny, those carb snacks I only take before sleeping because i have 8 hrs. of sleeping inactivity ahead and want to avoid hypoglycemia; the rest of my meals are a Canada Diabetes guide meals, and exercise, and the glyclazide and the Metformin. I think my statement was generalized. Yes, i agree with you-- i thinkk that the glucometer is analogous to a thermometer. We are so lucky to have it. In reading the history of diabetes i read that people used urine tests - that must have been so restricting in life activity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Last year, beginning my treatment, my dr. noted 3 hypo incidents (2.5 - 3.0) and
did not like it at all. He changed my meds. I have not had it hypos often, since but if I am not careful in monitoring (going out, not having my equipment with me, etc.) I have had gone down to the 3s which do not feel good at all-- dizzy, lack of concentration, coordination, anxiety, etc. As I am often alone, it is important for me to avoid them.

I like legumes (lentils, beans) and I love fish which I eat quite often - carbs are about 40% of my daily diet.
 

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Duh! I forgot the most important question: are you on insulin or other meds capable of producing lows? Everything I said was intended for the "no" case. If you are, that is another matter. You may need to get your dosage adjusted.

Sorry about that.


Last year, beginning my treatment, my dr. noted 3 hypo incidents (2.5 - 3.0) and
did not like it at all. He changed my meds. I have not had it hypos often, since but if I am not careful in monitoring (going out, not having my equipment with me, etc.) I have had gone down to the 3s which do not feel good at all-- dizzy, lack of concentration, coordination, anxiety, etc. As I am often alone, it is important for me to avoid them.

I like legumes (lentils, beans) and I love fish which I eat quite often - carbs are about 40% of my daily diet.
 
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