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Wild and Ancient Fruit: Is it Really Small, Bitter, and Low in Sugar? « Raw Food SOS: Troubleshooting on the Raw Food Diet

After reading this I may have to consider adjusting my attitude to fruit in the role of the healthy diet for folks without Diabetes but I still know what I know, from self-testing, about the effect it has on my own BGs. Also there are concerns regarding the apparent toxic excess of Fructose in the Western diet (see Dr Lustig's Sugar: The Bitter Truth on YouTube for example) so for my money: if fruit is your "poison" you may want to forgo other sources of Fructose (like everything containing HFCS) to help keep your overall intake of Fructose moderate and safe. Oh and my advice is to eat the whole fruit and save juice for hypo corrections only. :hippie:

It is a long post so I'd recommend visiting the site (some interesting pictures of exotic fruit too) but here is the Reader's Digest version...
Although not all wild fruits are as big and sweet as our modern cultivars, at least some are, and certain varieties even surpass our deliberately-bred fruits in size and flavor. Nature—especially with selection pressure from other fruit-eating creatures—is perfectly capable of producing sweet (and sometimes massive) fruits without human intervention. It seems unlikely that early humans only ever encountered berries or other “small, bitter” fruits, and avoiding sweeter fruits on the basis of evolutionary history may be misguided.

Based on the limited research we have, wild fruits aren’t considerably different from cultivated fruit in terms of carbohydrate content, fructose content, or fiber content. Both wild and cultivated fruit seem to average around 90% of calories from carbohydrates, and have a sugar composition that yields roughly equal parts glucose and fructose. And both wild and cultivated fruit can be relatively high or low in fiber.

Although berries are often lauded as being lower in fructose compared to other fruits, from a calorie/energy standpoint, this just ain’t true!

Early humans may very well have had access to fruit for most or even all of the year. The fruiting seasons we witness in cooler climates—with most fruit appearing in the summer—doesn’t necessarily apply to our evolutionary homeland closer to the equator.
 
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Giving up fruit has been the most difficult part of diabetes for me. I accepted I would have to when 1/2 grapefruit spiked me 50 pts, and so stuck with handfuls of berries.

This gives me motivation to start testing other fruits. There could be some lurking that I could tolerate, and that would be ... well ... delicious.
 
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