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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had some blood test done last year and my A1c reading was 5.2, I repeated the blood test last week and my A1c came back at 5.1, which seems to be normal, but....

I have always been worried of becoming a diabetic because I eat too much sweets and pasta, and I have some people around me with diabetes and it's no fun, so I take it very seriously. In the last 2 months I have been checking my blood sugar in the morning and throughout the day, I have reduced the sugar and carbohydrates intake by at least 60% because I was getting morning readings from 95 to 102, by the way, I have lost 22 pounds in the last three months because I went on a self imposed diet.

But something strange has been happening for the last 3 days, I have been eating small amounts of foods low in sugar and carbohydrates and fasting from 6:00 PM until 10:00 am the morning, when I go to sleep I have readings of about 87 to 92, but my glucose readings have been 102, 103 and 107 the following mornings, I am very confused to say the least, and have no idea what's going on, I know about the dawn phenomenon, but is isn't a non-diabetic supposed to wake up with glucose under 99 in the morning, especially with an A1c reading of 5.1?
 

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Hi, Luigy, welcome to our community!

I guess the first question to ask is what may have changed in the last three days. New container of strips? Different sample site? Feel an infection (cold? body part?) coming on?

You also may not know that the blood glucose meters most of us use are considered accurate if their readings are within 15% of the real value. Your readings have been a little high for that recently but it's possible you were reading low of the true value for a while and now you're reading high.

So any ideas on what might be different now?
 

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Thank you for your quick response. I use the contour next, and I in fact I have been using new a batch of strips for the last 5 days, 15% off the real reading is quite high, 100 vs 85 is a huge difference to determine if you are pre-diabetic. I guess I will have to go by my AC1 done by a professional lab, and take the home reading just as guiding tool?
 

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As a not-quite-sure-you're diabetic, yes, the meter can be a guide. The A1c is a better history of excess glucose over time anyway (covers the times you're not actively measuring). Home blood glucose meters (especially for Type 2s) are helpful in identifying trends (like increased average fasting blood glucose over several months) or, more immediately, knowing that your BG has gone up because of an infection or stress or some other issue.

By the way, just because meters can be 15% off does not mean they're always somewhere out there. Measuring BG has many points of "impairment": how clean the sample site is, where on the body the sample is drawn, how much blood is tested (too small a sample will skew results), the fact that blood is not homegeneous, storage conditions for the strips (including expiration date), condition of the battery in the meter, etc. We've even had people on this site who determined that a heavily-scented soap they were using to wash their hands was throwing off their blood samples.

So there's really no need to be really concerned at this point. You might want to watch, though, to see if the low 100s for your morning test turns into 120s a few months down the line. Not that we hope that happens, but it would be more of an indication to do something if you were routinely running 120s in the morning rather than just happening to hit 120 tomorrow. Does that make sense?

I hope you stick around with us. There's lots of support, advice, low-carb recipes, etc. here that might help you avoid becoming diabetic.
 

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Hi Luigy39, welcome to the forum.

The A1c indicates an average BG over the previous 3 months. The comparison of last years and this years says that your average for each particular 3 month period average is lower this year than last years. It doesn't say anything about the three 3 month averages in between (assuming taken a year apart). One would reasonably presume that there were no major deviations in between though. To me, my A1c only tells me what my average is. An average is the sum of sample numbers divided by the number of samples taken.The individual sample numbers can be close together or further apart, i.e. 50 and 100 average 75, so does 70 and 80, and so does 40, 50, 60, 70. 70, 70, and 165. The A1c does not tell you what number go into that average, but if you test with a meter enough times per day to get a fairly realistic daily average over time, the A1c number you get is usually pretty close.

I would not think you were medically defined "prediabetic" at this time. My definition of a real prediabetic is anyone not diabetic. My PCP told me that being prediabetic is like being prepregnant, either you is, or you ain't (his exact words and I still laugh when I think about it).

The meter you are using is probably more accurate than the FDA requirements for home BG monitor accuracy.
  • 95% within +/- 15% across the measuring range
  • 99% within +/- 20% across the measuring range
Prior to 2018 the accuracy requirement was within 20%. Doesn't sound like much difference but that is a 25% reduction in the required accuracy.

...
But something strange has been happening for the last 3 days, I have been eating small amounts of foods low in sugar and carbohydrates and fasting from 6:00 PM until 10:00 am the morning, when I go to sleep I have readings of about 87 to 92, but my glucose readings have been 102, 103 and 107 the following mornings, I am very confused to say the least, and have no idea what's going on, I know about the dawn phenomenon, but is isn't a non-diabetic supposed to wake up with glucose under 99 in the morning, especially with an A1c reading of 5.1?
For most, Type 2 Diabetes starts out with something causing the development of insulin resistance, your body has to produce more and more insulin to keep the BG numbers in the normal range, until it reaches a point that your BG numbers begin to rise a little higher and a little longer before returning to "Normal" after eating. As itissteve said, you might want to keep an eye on things with your BG meter. You might see something in a few months watching your fasting. You're waiting a year to see something with your A1c. Probably better to spot check before and after meals with the similar types and number of carbs if you want to see something sooner than the fasting numbers only. A rise in fasting numbers may be the last thing to reflect the rising numbers that show up in an A1c. JMO
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have been checking my numbers 2 hours after eating everyday, I have also stopped eating bread, rice, desserts, and any type of sweet drinks, nowadays those reading never get above 120 an hour and a half to 2 and a half hours after lunch, so the way I am eating now has reduced the spikes. the highest I've had my blood sugar while eating regularly, was 2 hours after breakfast when I had about 8 oz of milk and 2 big pieces of french bread, and it gave me a reading of 152 and that spooked me enough to change my diet, so I decided to cut carbohydrates and the rest.
 

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I have been a diagnosed Type 2 diabetic for just over 30 years and am one of the fortunate ones and to date have no side effects from this frustrating disease.
I have regular A1c's performed and when my doctor gives me the result, I just look at him and say 'how'?
My glucose level meter gives me a quite different 'average' reading.
I watch what I eat and when I have a 'high' level I think what am I getting as I know illness can push of normal levels or else, I think what did I eat that I shouldn't have eaten and I can usually pinpoint it being due to a great meal!!
Overall, I don't worry too much as over the years I have learnt not to be as 'paranoid' as I was when first diagnosed and now know what is 'normal' for myself.
I wish you well and remember, we are all individuals, and so our results will sometimes be different to the 'book'.
 

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My morning BG readings are consistently higher in the mornings and after some reading I think it is due to the liver releasing glucose into the blood to help "wake up". I have the same routine as you regarding when I eat, dinner at 5 and nothing until breakfast at 10 am. This helps a lot and I don't find myself wanting much of a lunch due to eating a high protein high fat breakfast. Usually eggs and bacon or sausage.
I too was very upset when told I was type 2, but after reading and experimenting with food and my meter I've found what I can and cannot eat. I'm on no meds and have been maintaining with diet and exercise. Each person is different, you just have to find what works for you.
 
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