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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My wife just came from the doctor and her results were as follows:

Hemoglobin A1c - 14.2
Estimated Average Glucose - 249
Cholesterol - 320
Triglyceride - >480
Alkaline Phosphatase - 163
Alkaline Aminotransferase - 62
Glucose - 335
Protein - 8.4
Sodium - 135

These are the things that were out of limits. They wanted her to take insulin right away, but from my experience, once you start taking it, your on it for life. (i may be way off base with that) They gave her Metformin, and Lisinopril. I have had great success in the past with a ketogenic diet, and have learned quite a bit about the macros, what works and what doesn't, etc...Once on the Metformin, will she be able to get off that once she gets dialed in on a lchf / keto diet? I'm always concerned about big pharma, and don't want her to get dependent on medications to stay alive, however I don't know how critical this is. The doctor said the good news was that her kidneys were functioning properly, however her lungs were taking a hit. I don't know how she came to that conclusion, but we need to get ahold of this asap. Does anyone take the medications listed above, or what advice can anyone offer. Thanks

They want her to take the metformin (2) 500mg tablets a day. The Lisinopril is 5mg per day. I don't know if I should be more worried about her glucose levels, or the medications. Were cleaning out the fridge and pantry as we speak.
 

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Hello, Criznik. Welcome to the site!

Many folks here take Metformin. It's gotten a lot of study and is pretty benign as far as negative side effects go even, apparently, over longer terms. Lisinopril is not a diabetes medication; it's there to manage something else (probably high blood pressure).

Medications prescribed to diabetics are dosed to correspond to their blood glucose levels. Slightly elevated BG levels call for less medication (or insulin). And it can vary. Some people who do not manage their BG well find themselves on higher and higher doses of Met or another medication (like Januvia) is added to their Met regimen. But meds can go down, too. Several people here who have switched to a low-carb/keto eating plan and bumped up their exercise have found they can scale back on their medications or insulin and still maintain healthy BG levels. So I would not fear that, once Metformin or insulin is started, there's no stopping.

But your wife has to be willing to change a few things, too. Like what she eats. You are familiar with a ketogenic eating plan, so you know what it entails as far as menu changes. Some people can manage to make that turn in the road; others cannot. Your wife could try eating keto for a few weeks and see what happens to her BG levels (she should be testing if she hasn't already started). There are many resources here to get you started on that path -- and lots of support for making the change. After a lifetime of carbs, sometimes it's pretty hard to say goodbye to them. There also are many studies showing that keto eating plans, despite the presence of large amounts of fat, are also good for cholesterol/triglyceride levels. But that's a whole 'nother thread, if you know what I mean.

Let us know how we can help both of you!

EDITED TO ADD: I need to state that we're not medical doctors here and we cannot offer medical advice. We can relate our experiences and tell you that an A1c of 14.2 will not set the folks at the Guinness book of records abuzz. This definitely is a wakeup call for your wife. But she should have a little time to set things straight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello, Criznik. Welcome to the site!

Many folks here take Metformin. It's gotten a lot of study and is pretty benign as far as negative side effects go even, apparently, over longer terms. Lisinopril is not a diabetes medication; it's there to manage something else (probably high blood pressure).

Medications prescribed to diabetics are dosed to correspond to their blood glucose levels. Slightly elevated BG levels call for less medication (or insulin). And it can vary. Some people who do not manage their BG well find themselves on higher and higher doses of Met or another medication (like Januvia) is added to their Met regimen. But meds can go down, too. Several people here who have switched to a low-carb/keto eating plan and bumped up their exercise have found they can scale back on their medications or insulin and still maintain healthy BG levels. So I would not fear that, once Metformin or insulin is started, there's no stopping.

But your wife has to be willing to change a few things, too. Like what she eats. You are familiar with a ketogenic eating plan, so you know what it entails as far as menu changes. Some people can manage to make that turn in the road; others cannot. Your wife could try eating keto for a few weeks and see what happens to her BG levels (she should be testing if she hasn't already started). There are many resources here to get you started on that path -- and lots of support for making the change. After a lifetime of carbs, sometimes it's pretty hard to say goodbye to them. There also are many studies showing that keto eating plans, despite the presence of large amounts of fat, are also good for cholesterol/triglyceride levels. But that's a whole 'nother thread, if you know what I mean.

Let us know how we can help both of you!

EDITED TO ADD: I need to state that we're not medical doctors here and we cannot offer medical advice. We can relate our experiences and tell you that an A1c of 14.2 will not set the folks at the Guinness book of records abuzz. This definitely is a wakeup call for your wife. But she should have a little time to set things straight.
Thanks for the reply and the support offered here. It means alot.
 

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Hi Criznik, welcome to the forum.

I can ditto everything itissteve has said and recommend trying a keto diet.

As far as the meds go, I take Metformin 500 x 2, lisinopril 5mg, and I have taken insulin in the past.

Once my BG got under control, I quit taking metformin because I wanted to, no issues with it or quitting it. I did start taking it again after having quad bypass surgery because of some of its other benefits, reduces inflammation, lowers risks of certain types of cancers, etc.

I was put on Lisinopril for blood pressure, I started off at 20 mg and it has been reduced to 5 mg. I have heard of some diabetics being put on lisinopril for kidney protection. You didn't mention blood pressure, but I'm guessing with the other things listed, her BP may be high too, if not, the lisinopril may be for for kidney protection. I think there is a lot bad said about it, but only thing I can attest to is that it did cause a case of Lisinopril cough for me, not bad or constant, but when something tickles the back of my throat and I cough.

I've taken insulin before, after my quad bypass. Not for high BG but to help keep it close to normal levels (90s) for better healing. High BG makes for slow healing. Many people have taken insulin initially and were able to get off of it. It is not once on it, on it for life.

I too share your wariness of big pharma. I control my BG with keto diet and exercise. Like I said I do take metformin, and if I need anything else, it will be insulin for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Criznik, welcome to the forum.

I can ditto everything itissteve has said and recommend trying a keto diet.

As far as the meds go, I take Metformin 500 x 2, lisinopril 5mg, and I have taken insulin in the past.

Once my BG got under control, I quit taking metformin because I wanted to, no issues with it or quitting it. I did start taking it again after having quad bypass surgery because of some of its other benefits, reduces inflammation, lowers risks of certain types of cancers, etc.

I was put on Lisinopril for blood pressure, I started off at 20 mg and it has been reduced to 5 mg. I have heard of some diabetics being put on lisinopril for kidney protection. You didn't mention blood pressure, but I'm guessing with the other things listed, her BP may be high too, if not, the lisinopril may be for for kidney protection. I think there is a lot bad said about it, but only thing I can attest to is that it did cause a case of Lisinopril cough for me, not bad or constant, but when something tickles the back of my throat and I cough.

I've taken insulin before, after my quad bypass. Not for high BG but to help keep it close to normal levels (90s) for better healing. High BG makes for slow healing. Many people have taken insulin initially and were able to get off of it. It is not once on it, on it for life.

I too share your wariness of big pharma. I control my BG with keto diet and exercise. Like I said I do take metformin, and if I need anything else, it will be insulin for me.
Thank You
 

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My wife just came from the doctor and her results were as follows:

Hemoglobin A1c - 14.2
Estimated Average Glucose - 249
Cholesterol - 320
Triglyceride - >480
Alkaline Phosphatase - 163
Alkaline Aminotransferase - 62
Glucose - 335
Protein - 8.4
Sodium - 135

These are the things that were out of limits. They wanted her to take insulin right away, but from my experience, once you start taking it, your on it for life. (i may be way off base with that) They gave her Metformin, and Lisinopril. I have had great success in the past with a ketogenic diet, and have learned quite a bit about the macros, what works and what doesn't, etc...Once on the Metformin, will she be able to get off that once she gets dialed in on a lchf / keto diet? I'm always concerned about big pharma, and don't want her to get dependent on medications to stay alive, however I don't know how critical this is. The doctor said the good news was that her kidneys were functioning properly, however her lungs were taking a hit. I don't know how she came to that conclusion, but we need to get ahold of this asap. Does anyone take the medications listed above, or what advice can anyone offer. Thanks

They want her to take the metformin (2) 500mg tablets a day. The Lisinopril is 5mg per day. I don't know if I should be more worried about her glucose levels, or the medications. Were cleaning out the fridge and pantry as we speak.
My a1c was 12.5 when I was diagnosed 16 years ago. The Nurse Practitioner wanted to put me on insulin immediately. Thank fully the Doctor intervened and said, let’s try diet and meds first. Although I have occasion a1c spikes, my average a1c for the past 6 years in under 7, and I am not on the max Med dose. I eat what I want, but don’t eat carbs that I don’t feel like eating. For example, I may eat some French fries, but hardly never eat an entire order. If her kidneys are ok, try the Adkins diet. It did it for 16 weeks in 2013, and reduced, or eliminated all of my medications. Also get the book, Glycemic Load Diet, by Dr. Rob Thompson. Great book, and the doctor provides has email, and will answer your questions.
 

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My a1c was 12.5 when I was diagnosed 16 years ago. The Nurse Practitioner wanted to put me on insulin immediately. Thank fully the Doctor intervened and said, let’s try diet and meds first. Although I have occasion a1c spikes, my average a1c for the past 6 years in under 7, and I am not on the max Med dose. I eat what I want, but don’t eat carbs that I don’t feel like eating. For example, I may eat some French fries, but hardly never eat an entire order. If her kidneys are ok, try the Adkins diet. It did it for 16 weeks in 2013, and reduced, or eliminated all of my medications. Also get the book, Glycemic Load Diet, by Dr. Rob Thompson. Great book, and the doctor provides has email, and will answer your questions.
Everyone talks glycemic index, including the diabetic association. The important number, as pointed out by Dr Thompson, is Glycemic load, which ties a foods impact on blood sugar, by your serving size. For example the Glycemic Index for watermelon is 74, which is high, and should be avoided, but it’s glycemic load is below 10, which indicates a very low impact on blood sugar. Do some research. Cinnamon capsules provide blood sugar control. Grape seed extract is powerful anti inflammatory. It reduces inflammation in your arteries and veins, reducing blood pressure. It fights free radicals. Check benefits on line. You need to investigate, investigate, investigate. Doctors know nothing except to prescribe meds.
 

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Everyone talks glycemic index, including the diabetic association. The important number, as pointed out by Dr Thompson, is Glycemic load, which ties a foods impact on blood sugar, by your serving size. For example the Glycemic Index for watermelon is 74, which is high, and should be avoided, but it’s glycemic load is below 10, which indicates a very low impact on blood sugar. Do some research. Cinnamon capsules provide blood sugar control. Grape seed extract is powerful anti inflammatory. It reduces inflammation in your arteries and veins, reducing blood pressure. It fights free radicals. Check benefits on line. You need to investigate, investigate, investigate. Doctors know nothing except to prescribe meds.
One more thing. After 16 years, my eye doctor tells me, if I didn’t know you had diabetes, I could never tell from your eyes. Bottom line, you do not want to go on insulin now.
 

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.....Check benefits on line. You need to investigate, investigate, investigate. Doctors know nothing except to prescribe meds.
This is so true. A lot of information has come out and what was thought good/bad may not really be, now that more information has come out, i.e. eggs, caffeine, fats, food plans, etc.

Tstewartjr, welcome to the forum. I would like to invite you to post in the New Member Introductions forum so that we can get to know you better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
One more thing. After 16 years, my eye doctor tells me, if I didn’t know you had diabetes, I could never tell from your eyes. Bottom line, you do not want to go on insulin now.
Thanks for the insight. We have alot in common and I don't trust many doctors. My father passed away last year, ultimately because of diabetes, and I tried for years to get him to listen to me. He swallowed everything his diabetic nutritionist told him, which most of it was pure BS. I have been studying Dr. Berg, Dr. Jason Fung, and a couple of others for several years. I am a power plant chief engineer, and do maintenance on diesels, gas turbines, and high pressure boilers. The body is a machine and needs the right operator and the right maintenance. I equate mm oat of these doctors to the mechanics at the big name dealerships...many are not mechanics at all...they are parts changers. Oh your sick, here, take these drugs. Don't worry about the side effects, I just want to get my kick back from big pharma. Just like the poor people who have rushed out to take this death shot for covid...we are in deep Doo Doo.
 

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My wife just came from the doctor and her results were as follows:

Hemoglobin A1c - 14.2
Estimated Average Glucose - 249
Cholesterol - 320
Triglyceride - >480
Alkaline Phosphatase - 163
Alkaline Aminotransferase - 62
Glucose - 335
Protein - 8.4
Sodium - 135

These are the things that were out of limits. They wanted her to take insulin right away, but from my experience, once you start taking it, your on it for life. (i may be way off base with that) They gave her Metformin, and Lisinopril. I have had great success in the past with a ketogenic diet, and have learned quite a bit about the macros, what works and what doesn't, etc...Once on the Metformin, will she be able to get off that once she gets dialed in on a lchf / keto diet? I'm always concerned about big pharma, and don't want her to get dependent on medications to stay alive, however I don't know how critical this is. The doctor said the good news was that her kidneys were functioning properly, however her lungs were taking a hit. I don't know how she came to that conclusion, but we need to get ahold of this asap. Does anyone take the medications listed above, or what advice can anyone offer. Thanks

They want her to take the metformin (2) 500mg tablets a day. The Lisinopril is 5mg per day. I don't know if I should be more worried about her glucose levels, or the medications. Were cleaning out the fridge and pantry as we speak.
Trust your doctor. If you are not going to listen to her advice -don’t ask for it. She is there to help and guide you on the best way forward. If you tackle it together it can be done.
I was on insulin and metformin for 6 years. My Hba1c is now steady on 6. With diet and walking I lost weight (98 down to 84) and have been off insulin and meds since 2020. I wish you well. Widgy.
 

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I was in the exact same boat. My A1C is 14.2. I was taking 64 units of insulin per day plus metformin in the other one that starts with a L... I needed to lose weight I still need to lose more weight. I begin the keto diet and I've lost 25 pounds and I've cut my insulin down to 40 units per day. Taking so much insulin will make it hard for you to lose weight.
I fall off of the keto wagon quite a bit. But I know that I have to climb back on. It is hard for sure. My doctor was mad at me because I cut my insulin down from 65 to 40 until he saw that my A1C came down to 7.3. So I don't always do what my doctor tells me to do because that's kind of how I got up to the 64 units a day.
I went to an endocrinologist and her goal was to get my A1C down. She didn't seem to care how she did it but she considered her goal was met because she got my A1C down.
 

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Trust your doctor. If you are not going to listen to her advice -don’t ask for it. She is there to help and guide you on the best way forward.
A friend of mine has been a family-practice doctor for about 30 years. When I told him of my diabetes diagnosis, he advised against eating keto because "it could cause ketoacidosis". In a later conversation, he declared that that A1cs below 7 (for diabetics) were "too low".

Clearly my friend's information about diabetes is not up to date. Many doctors receive very little education in nutrition and, unless they specialize in an associated area, know little more about diabetes than they know about Hashimoto's thyroiditis or fibromyalgia or carpal tunnel syndrome. As patients and diabetics who increasingly are responsible for coordinating our own care (at least in the U.S. medical system), I believe we owe it to ourselves to evaluate the advice we're given for its quality.
 
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