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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy everyone! I got my new A1C today and it was 4.4. That means my average blood glucose is 80. The only problem that my doctor has with that lower number (last A1C was 5.7) is the number of hypo's that I have been having. Saturday night, my blood sugar dropped to 23 at 5:00 PM. I just felt light headed. No shaking at all. My hands usually shake when my blood sugar is low. My body is getting used to the low numbers. My doctor wrote me a prescription for a Glucagon Emergency Kit. I don't know if my Mother is capable of learning how to prepare the injection. I live with my Mother, she has some memory problems. She does know that when my blood sugar does go low, and she knows that if I do not respond to her during a hypo that she needs to call 911. I have read that a shot of Glucagon will make you vomit and nauseated. I hope I never need it. Oh well, I will enjoy the 4.4 A1C!:dance:
 

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Holy cow, Breeze! That's incredible! Congratulations! Just try to get a handle on those lows, wouldja? We need you around here!
 

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I can understand your being excited over your 4.4, but an A1c that low is potentially dangerous if it causes very low blood sugar and terrible hypos. My doctor does not want any of his diabetic patients with A1c's below 5.5. I have kept my A1c's between 5.5 and 5.9 for several years. I do not have any hypos that cause me to become unconscious. I am always in complete control when I have my lows.

Having too many hypos and not feeling low is called "hypounaware". That is not a good thing. Reducing your number of lows by having a higher A1c is much healthier. You need to be able to easily feel your lows so you can do something about them before they become dangerous. Any A1c below 6.0 is a nondiabetic level. You don't need a 4.4 or even a 5.2. A1c's in the interval 5.5-5.9 is healthy and much safer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I can understand your being excited over your 4.4, but an A1c that low is potentially dangerous if it causes very low blood sugar and terrible hypos. My doctor does not want any of his diabetic patients with A1c's below 5.5. I have kept my A1c's between 5.5 and 5.9 for several years. I do not have any hypos that cause me to become unconscious. I am always in complete control when I have my lows.

Having too many hypos and not feeling low is called "hypounaware". That is not a good thing. Reducing your number of lows by having a higher A1c is much healthier. You need to be able to easily feel your lows so you can do something about them before they become dangerous. Any A1c below 6.0 is a nondiabetic level. You don't need a 4.4 or even a 5.2. A1c's in the interval 5.5-5.9 is healthy and much safer.
Richard, all I read about is having low blood sugar readings. The ADA says that 70-130 is the best range. If my average blood sugar is 80, why is this bad? I have never been unconscious from a hypo and so far have been in complete control of my lows. Am I becoming unaware of my hypos and am in a danger zone? My last low was 23 and I just felt light headed. I don't want to be in a unhealthy range. I don't understand what am I doing wrong? Help!
 

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If you keep on having lows below 50 and low A1c's like 4.4 then you will eventually be likely to no longer feel the lows. It has not happened yet, but it may after several months of this. The lowest A1c I have had was 5.3 and I had more hypos below 50 back then than at any other time in my life. I had a couple while driving. My judgement is not good below 50. It is very dangerous for me. I do not ever want that again. I have no extreme lows now, I have been type 1 for 64 years and I have no complications. I don't need lower A1c's. I don't understand why you want A1c's that low.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you keep on having lows below 50 and low A1c's like 4.4 then you will eventually be likely to no longer feel the lows. It has not happened yet, but it may after several months of this. The lowest A1c I have had was 5.3 and I had more hypos below 50 back then than at any other time in my life. I had a couple while driving. My judgement is not good below 50. It is very dangerous for me. I do not ever want that again. I have no extreme lows now, I have been type 1 for 64 years and I have no complications. I don't need lower A1c's. I don't understand why you want A1c's that low.
I want my A1C to be as low as possible, yet a healthy low. I guess it has become embedded in my mind that lower is better. There is so much emphasis on "low" blood sugar readings that I have lost sight of the practical picture. My doctor is an internist and will not refer me to an endo. I have yet to find an endo near me (within 50 miles of Columbus, Ohio) that will see me without a referral. I really think that seeing an endo would be a great benefit to me. Thank you for the advice.
 

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I also see an internal medicine specialist. He gave me a referral to an endo. I agree that an endo would be good for you. Do you think your current doctor is a good doctor? Does he know a lot about diabetes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I like my regular doctor. He seems to know some about diabetes but several times he couldn't answer my questions about diabetes. I would feel much better if I could just see an endo for a second opinion. I may ask again at my next visit about a referral. When you see an internist and and endo, who prescribes your diabetes medication?
 

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I have been seeing my internist for 33 years and he prescribes all my medications and blood tests. I trust him, he has many diabetes patients who like him. I also see him for other problems, so he is my GP. I do see an endo and get good second opinions concerning diabetes issues. I use an insulin pump and a CGM which require an endo's approval. My insurance will not pay for my pump, CGM and supplies unless I see an endo every three months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have been looking at the CGM's. I don't know if my insurance will cover it. I was thinking about paying for one out of pocket. Since I don't know that much about it, I don't know what supplies you need, so it is hard for me to see the entire financial picture
 

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I use the Dexcom 7 CGM. It is working great! The system costs about $999. The sensors are the extra supplies that you would need, at approximately $90 each. Each sensor, if applied and used properly, will last an average of two weeks.
 

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yes! exactly right...it is not a good thing...we are diabetic, thus need to have those diabetic safe a1c's. personally i have to stay around 7 when i'm healthy enough to exercise. running 6 miles 7x a week requires it. also i can't train someone in the gym if im falling out all the time ;).

keep that pos. attitude but with a safer a1c ;)
 
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