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Discussion Starter #1
I went to Quest and had my A1c tested.. It was 6.1
the same day I went to give blood.
Two weeks later I had my A1c done again bt Quest..It was 5.7
Why did giving blood drop my A1c that much??
 

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I went to Quest and had my A1c tested.. It was 6.1
the same day I went to give blood.
Two weeks later I had my A1c done again bt Quest..It was 5.7
Why did giving blood drop my A1c that much??
Im not sure I understand . If you took a reading and then gave blood and then got tested 2 weeks later, the number can be different depending on what you did, eat , exercise, etc. for the 2 weeks.

an A1C is a reading for the last 3 months...

so if Jan 1st your BG is 6.0 and then you go on March 31 and its 7.0, your A1c will be 6.5 (the 3 month average).

if you go again 2 weeks later and its 6.0, then your A1C will go down to probably 6.0 (the closest 3 month reading).

does that make sense?
 

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Possible explanation - no knowledge, just thinking logically:

Since you gave blood, you had fewer red blood cells? Don't know how quickly the body replenishes, and even if it did right away, these would be new cells which wouldn't have had time to accumulate glucose.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
That was my Experiment, I wondered if having new blood cells might lower my A1c... Then I was wondering if I just gave blood every 4 months if I would keep a lower A1c year around?
I test my BS all the time and it's never over 128. I just can't understand why my A1c runs so high. I wondered if for some reason my red blood cells don't turn over as fast as other people's? It was a Hillbilly experiment..Lol

I'm 6'1" 185 with a 32" waist at 53 years old. I run 5 miles in 45 min. I'm in real good shape for my age. I eat low carb and just can't wrap my head around the high A1c.
 

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This article must be what I read before:

Diabetes Update: Why A1c "Average" Doesn't Match Meter Tests at Normal Blood Sugars

In this study the scientists measured the lifetimes of hemoglobin cells in normal people and diabetics and found that the cells of the diabetics turned over much faster--as little as 81 days, while normal people's could live up to 146 days.

They suggest that getting better control will cause the cells to live longer. But when they live for a couple extra months, they will also continue to glycate--i.e. collect the bits of sugar that are measured in the A1c test. Cells that are living longer may collect after 5 months of life the same amount of glucose a person with poor control might collect in 3 months. That doesn't mean they have the average blood sugars as the person who developed that degree of glycation in the much shorter period.
 

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Don't know the explanation because I didn't ask, but doc did tell me that if I was going to do a blood donation, to not do it the month before my appointment with him because it sometimes screws up labs.
 
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