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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So the number my doctor used to diagnose me with diabetes and to put me on metformin was actually a 5.6 rather than the 7.0 I'd believed it was. I can't find it anywhere as a diabetic number. I know it's at the end of the so-called normal range, just before the pre-diabetic range, but, is it really a definitive diagnostic for type two diabetes at 5.6?

Is this maybe the reason that my blood sugars have tested absolutely normal for the week I've been monitoring them? I mean, aside from the high carb meal that brought me up to 128 two hours after eating it? My highest fasting BG was 88. My usual fasting BG is between 72 - 83. My post meal blood sugars are usually between 119 and 88.

If I'm not really diabetic, I'm a little concerned that with a diagnosis of type two diabetes in my record I'll be given unnecessary insulin if I'm hospitalized for a different health condition or accident.

I did recently get onto effective pain medication. Could that be why my blood sugar is normal now despite this 5.6 taken before the pain meds were prescribed?

Now I'm really confused.
 

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I don't know... When I'm in pain my BG spike's 50+ points so that could be it. Definitely worth figuring out, 5.6 is a great # and I'm jealous of your post meals too!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't know... When I'm in pain my BG spike's 50+ points so that could be it. Definitely worth figuring out, 5.6 is a great # and I'm jealous of your post meals too!
Wow! I didn't know pain could make blood sugar rise so much, the doctor said it was negligible. If I had a 5.6 while suffering chronic, widespread pain (lowest the pain ever got was maybe a 6 on the 1-10 scale with frequent spikes into the 9.5 range) without relief, I'm wondering if it will be normal with my pain well controlled. I've also heard fevers increase blood sugar and I have daily fevers (likely from my lupus) and high fevers (102 or higher) several times per week.

I haven't been on the prescribed metformin (had to stop taking it due to fountaining fluids out both ends non-stop) yet my blood sugars are staying very normal. Don't be jealous yet, I'm wondering if I'm even a diabetic. Clearly the doctor thinks I am and I'm almost wondering if he had that 7 in his head, too.
 

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I have both chronic and acute pain. The chronic pain doesn't spike me high but it does keep my fasting BG's higher than I would like. It's the acute pain that sends it through the roof. I assume because of all the other stress hormones that are triggered with that kind of pain.

I'm no expert on diagnosing borderline diabetics but completely agree that if you aren't it's best to not have that on your record. I don't know what they do in cases like yours. Are you following up with the doc to understand why he thinks you are diabetic?
 

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This all seems fishy to me. I think there is a chance your BG could have been higher when you were in pain and your body was fighting all sorts of other conditions.

I would say he would have a hard time diagnosing you with an A1C like that, it looks great and normal to me.

Are you on any diabetic meds right now or is your BG controlled simply by diet?
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This all seems fishy to me. I think there is a chance your BG could have been higher when you were in pain and your body was fighting all sorts of other conditions.

I would say he would have a hard time diagnosing you with an A1C like that, it looks great and normal to me.

Are you on any diabetic meds right now or is your BG controlled simply by diet?
I'm not on any meds for diabetes and my blood sugar is controlled by not doing anything at all. In the past month I re-added exercise to my life since getting on pain medications. My pain-induced carb binging (which never was all that binge-y in the first place, sometimes I'd devour a whole big banana or eat a serving of pudding when I was feeling too much pain to want anything else) has disappeared. So I expect the number to go down further just with the increased exercise and absence of emotional carb consumption.

The charts I've seen don't even show a 5.6 as pre-diabetic, much less full-blown type two. It's kind of close to the pre-diabetic guidelines on the more strict scales but it isn't inside them. I just don't know how this got me a full-blown type two diagnosis.
 

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This is tremendous news. What you are now saying does seem completely normal.

I have chronic pain, but it's so chronic that I don't know if my bs would be lower without it. I do think my change of diet has affected my pain levels positively, and my bs has gone down, but am not able to separate these things to come to any conclusions, re causality.

I'm so happy for you - seriously. Hopefully the experience was useful in assessing your diet (if I didn't have diabetes I'd not go back to my low-fat eating, that's for sure!) - and being thankful this is one thing that most likely you don't have!

Splendid.
 
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Any type of inflammation or pain could cause higher bgs. You are right a 5.6 is on the higher end of normal. Mine used to be above 10 but now it is 5.3, but I am on medication. Usually 6.5 or two fasting tests over 125 would indicate Type 2 diabetes. Even prediabetic usually starts around 6.0. I am with you I don't know why they dx'd you and put you on metformin. Some PCOS patients and some doctors prescribe it for weight loss.
 
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Methinks there needs to be a review of your medical records & these recent tests results to determine exactly who decided what & based on what evidence. If your A1c was truly 5.6, then whoever passed down the wrong diagnosis needs to own up to it like they did with Murph - sat down with him & admitted "we misdiagnosed you". If you were misdiagnosed, that type 2 shouldn't be left on your chart without an amendment that you are NOT type 2, and never were, complete with names, dates & true test results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hopefully the experience was useful in assessing your diet (if I didn't have diabetes I'd not go back to my low-fat eating, that's for sure!) - and being thankful this is one thing that most likely you don't have!
I am extremely thankful that I don't have diabetes, if, in fact, I don't. I wish no one had it. I watched my mother (from 650 miles away, unfortunately) slowly become crippled by it and slowly go blind.

It may turn out to be somewhat helpful in the long run but I was slowly ambling toward low carb and already was away from packaged foods on my own. What it has done is make me terrified of eating anything, even "safe" foods. I suffer from PTSD (molestation survivor/multiple rape survivor/attempted murder survivor/witness to and victim of violence) as well as Asperger's and I don't shrug off major shocks like I used to. The diagnosis, combined with the lack of information (until I found this forum), combined with the hell week of seizures from the medication reaction, combined with the shaming, combined with the strange behavior of the doctor all caught me at a very vulnerable time. I'd just recently experienced something very triggering at my prior doctor's office (I won't go into detail but someone who has survived rape by foreign object, knife, doesn't do well when a clumsy doctor first shames her, gives her a tiny gown, and causes her completely unnecessary pain during a pelvic then doesn't let her redress to lecture her about health while not trying to diagnose her serious illness) that made her a prior doctor. That experience left me in a state of what psychologists call hyper-arousal just in time for this other batch of crap to hit the fan.

Logically, I know I can eat as I normally do now and be fine but emotions don't seem to listen to logic. I feel really stupid being afraid of eating.

All that confusion and shaming I experienced makes my heart go out to all of you who actually have diabetes. None of that is good for anyone. I'm sorry you've had to go through all of that on top of having a craptastic disease.

It's an odd thing; everyone seems to have someone they love affected by diabetes, but few people seem to know much about it but the stupid stereotypes.

I'm already an activist trying to fight homelessness, religious intolerance, discrimination against lgbt people, and crappy health care. I plan to begin by writing about my experience being diagnosed with diabetes because more people should know about the emotional baggage doctors, friends, family, and society at large wrongfully attach to it. I'd also like to encourage folks here to write about their experiences with diabetes to educate others about the human aspects of it. My other plans to try to help are very vague and shapeless at the moment but I'm sure they will eventually come into focus.
 

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I'm sorry that you had to go through this potential misdiagnosis on top of your other concerns. Believe me I understand how your past experiences and PTSD have made the stress of this much much worse. *HUG*

I have my fingers crossed that you will soon be confirmed as non-diabetic.
 
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