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Adventure at lunch today:

I learned what "brick leaves" are today.* I eat regularly at the St. Tropez Bakery and Bistro--sometimes having a Cobb salad, sometimes a grilled salmon salad, sometimes an omelet (mushroom and sausage, feta and spinach--there are lots of permutations).* All very BG-friendly (I get sliced tomatoes instead of potatoes and fruit). Today I decided to try the Goat Cheese Salad:*
Warm goat cheese rolled in brick leaves, tomato, cucumber, croutons, red bell pepper, red onion, olive & French pickle with Red Wine Vinaigrette
Of course, I asked them to hold the croutons. Culinary dilettante that I am, however, I thought that "brick leaves" were some variation of "grape leaves."* Turns out they're akin to filo dough--like warm goat cheese-filled, very thin, bread envelopes.*

When the salad came, I realized what they were.* I briefly considered trying to unwrap them to eat the cheese out of them, but realized that that would not be feasible.* Soooooooooo . . . I ate them.

I forgot to measure my BG before lunch. 10 minutes after starting, my BG was 100.* At 30 minutes, it was 130.* At 45 minutes, it was 117; at 1 hour, 114, at 90 minutes, 109; at 2 hours, 114 (I figure that I was pretty flat from 45 minutes through the rest of 2 hours).* By 3 hours PP, I was down to 102, and at 4 1/2 hours, I was down to 91.*
 

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Looks like you came out smelling rather like a rose, ShottleBop! But a rather long detour from what you're accustomed to . . . glad it wasn't any worse!

Having never heard of brick leaves before either, I've been looking for some small reference to it, but other than discovering it's prob'ly "brique" or "bricvel", there's essentially nothing online about it! I've done plenty of cooking with phyllo & puff pastry in years past, but this is a mystery to me.
 

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Sounds delicious. I would eat warm goat cheese wrapped in cardboard. In the early 70's when I visited my sister in France, she made salads with a hunk of goat cheese (first time I had eaten it) rolled in bread crumbs and heated. I died every time I took a bite.

I used to smuggle goat cheese in from France so I could eat and serve this in the US. Couldn't then get goat cheese and certainly not the delicious unpasturized ... I was quite the cheese mule.

My recent love is The Drunken Goat - goat cheese marinated in red wine. It's subtle but wonderful. Goat cheese rules!
 
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