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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
•Participants weighed an average of 224 pounds before their weight loss. They dropped an average of 69 pounds.

•They had maintained an average of a 52-pound loss at five years and an average of a 51-pound loss at 10 years.
While lazily surfing the web sipping my evening "week-end" elaichi (cardamom) tea, I chanced upon this piece of news of a recent study on weight loss success. Read on, it is interesting. Couldn't find more details of the study other than that given in this USA Today web page.

I count neither calories nor fat grams but my personal experience has been that when I eat a little less and move a little more (i.e., do more exercise) I become trimmer, a little more muscular and more energetic. I lose a little weight too and am able to keep it off as long as I continue exercise and eating less. When I used to eat more and moved less, I had a little more weight, was a bit more slothful and was less healthy overall. Exercise and the principle of calorie-in-calorie-out seem to work straightforward (and wonderfully) on my body, and not mysteriously and in ways inexplicable to mainstream science.

Regards,
Rad
 

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While lazily surfing the web sipping my evening "week-end" elaichi (cardamom) tea, I chanced upon this piece of news of a recent study on weight loss success. Read on, it is interesting. Couldn't find more details of the study other than that given in this USA Today web page.

I count neither calories nor fat grams but my personal experience has been that when I eat a little less and move a little more (i.e., do more exercise) I become trimmer, a little more muscular and more energetic. I lose a little weight too and am able to keep it off as long as I continue exercise and eating less. When I used to eat more and moved less, I had a little more weight, was a bit more slothful and was less healthy overall. Exercise and the principle of calorie-in-calorie-out seem to work straightforward (and wonderfully) on my body, and not mysteriously and in ways inexplicable to mainstream science.

Regards,
Rad
I think my Endo Doc would agree with you.
 

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Alternately, exercise helps break insulin resistance and thus lessens the circulating amounts of the hormone insulin a trigger of the deposition of fat.

Same destination, different route for your consideration.
 

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Well, that's certainly been my experience eating LC/HF and I don't have to "eat less" but eat exactly as much as I want to. It also makes little difference whether I exercise or not (I've tried both), but I do tend to want a little less food when not exercising.
 

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For some people maybe the equation of calories in calories out works just fine. For others it is brutally wrong however. Brutal as in it messes with their head, making them think that it's all their fault that they can't lose weight when there may be other underlying causes.

Personally, if I reduce my calories or increase my exercise my body compensates by lowering my metabolism (lower body temp, no energy, more likely to catch a cold, etc). I have done medically supervised weight loss programs eating 1000-1200 cal/day while getting 1 hour of trainer supervised intense exercise (both strength and cardio) 6 days a week. Guess what? Didn't lose weight. Oh and my FBG, Lipids and BP went up. :D

Now that I eat LCHF, I'm able to eat a reasonable amount of calories (e.g. 1500-1800), only exercise moderately (strength 1x week + walking every day) and I lost 60 lbs. When I recently hit a 3 month stall, I started to doubt everything I had recently learned and even tried going back to calorie restriction. No dice. Then I forgot to take a med for 3 days and BAM! weight loss starts back up again.

The human body is a multivariate system, and it's naive to think that only 2 variables count (calories and exercise).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, that's certainly been my experience eating LC/HF and I don't have to "eat less" but eat exactly as much as I want to. It also makes little difference whether I exercise or not (I've tried both), but I do tend to want a little less food when not exercising.
When I wrote "eat less" it was just in comparison to what I ate before. I am well satiated and content with the "eating less" of present. So, my previous eating was a little more than what my tummy and body really needed. It was just a bad habit which ignored the satiety signals the body sent.

Regards,
Rad
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
For some people maybe the equation of calories in calories out works just fine. For others it is brutally wrong however. Brutal as in it messes with their head, making them think that it's all their fault that they can't lose weight when there may be other underlying causes.
Sorry to note that exercise and eating less did not work for you. It does work so well for me. And for many others I know personally. Well, what works for us need not necessarily work for you and vice versa. The great YMMV principle. I cannot imagine myself ever following a life style based on a very-low-carb-high-fat diet and fortunately I don't need it for keeping my blood sugar and lipid levels under normal levels or for improving my general health.

Regards,
Rad
 

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Sorry to note that exercise and eating less did not work for you. It does work so well for me. And for many others I know personally. Well, what works for us need not necessarily work for you and vice versa. The great YMMV principle. I cannot imagine myself ever following a life style based on a very-low-carb-high-fat diet and fortunately I don't need it for keeping my blood sugar and lipid levels under normal levels or for improving my general health.
Hehe sorry I was up on my high horse for a bit there. :D I was so hung up on my pet peeve that I overlooked the important part of what you posted, that when people stick to a diet that works for them they are able to maintain their weight loss.
 

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For some people maybe the equation of calories in calories out works just fine. For others it is brutally wrong however. Brutal as in it messes with their head, making them think that it's all their fault that they can't lose weight when there may be other underlying causes.

Personally, if I reduce my calories or increase my exercise my body compensates by lowering my metabolism (lower body temp, no energy, more likely to catch a cold, etc). I have done medically supervised weight loss programs eating 1000-1200 cal/day while getting 1 hour of trainer supervised intense exercise (both strength and cardio) 6 days a week. Guess what? Didn't lose weight. Oh and my FBG, Lipids and BP went up. :D

Now that I eat LCHF, I'm able to eat a reasonable amount of calories (e.g. 1500-1800), only exercise moderately (strength 1x week + walking every day) and I lost 60 lbs. When I recently hit a 3 month stall, I started to doubt everything I had recently learned and even tried going back to calorie restriction. No dice. Then I forgot to take a med for 3 days and BAM! weight loss starts back up again.

The human body is a multivariate system, and it's naive to think that only 2 variables count (calories and exercise).
Wow - I couldn't have said it better if I tried. The "in" and "out" concept misses the middle part: the "processing." I've been trying to tell my Doc this for YEARS. If weight loss was a "one size fits all" thing, we could all follow the exact same diet/activity plan and get the same results. And, clearly we don't.

My metabolism is all "artificially" produced because I don't have a Thyroid gland (lost to Cancer 10 years ago). So, my "processing" comes from the Synthroid pill I take.
 
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