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Artificial Pancreas By MedTronics

This is my first post. I am researching several areas in diabetes as a person who is Type 1 and my now ex-Wife is Type 2. The F.D.A has approved such device and there might be more information in regards to this matter within the forum.

However, I didn't see any information posted; so If I am repeating someone else's information. That makes the information "twice" as noticeable.

Here we go.....The device, made by Minneapolis-based Medtronics, relies on a computer algorithm to sync the results of a continuous reading of the wearer’s glucose levels with a pump that provides appropriate amounts of insulin. Its advantage is that it can automatically shut off the supply of insulin if the wearer’s glucose levels fall too low, which can lead to a diabetic coma. The device first alerts the wearer if blood sugar becomes dangerously low, but if s/he doesn’t respond, it shuts off the insulin supply for two hours. The sensor is also billed as more accurate, though still not as accurate as one might hope: Its false alarm rate is 33 percent, according to Medtronics. As a present study and this information has been out since September of this year. The device is called the MiniMed 530G. From my two month research of these devices my input would be the 33% inaccuracy rate of this device in mention. But, there is a lot of information about this venue and something to look into yourself. If you want more information I suggest goggling the products name I haven't found out if insurance covers such a device. Maybe this will spark someone's interest in researching this in addition to my posting. Thanks for reading my post.[/I][/U][/I][/I][/I][/U]
 

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I have an order in for one" MiniMed 530G with Enlite."

Supposedly it is 100% covered by my insurer, which is already nearly met for this year. We'll see!

However, this does NOT seem to be the same device as Gizmo is posting about ...
 

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The FDA is helping advance the development of an artificial pancreas device system (APDS)—an innovative device that automatically monitors blood glucose and provides appropriate insulin doses in people with diabetes who use insulin.

FDA’s efforts include prioritizing the review of research protocol studies, providing clear guidelines to industry, setting performance and safety standards, fostering discussions between government and private researchers, sponsoring public forums, and finding ways to shorten study and review time.

FDA’s release of Final Guidance for Industry and the Food and Drug Administration Staff: The Content of Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) and Premarket Approval (PMA) Applications for Artificial Pancreas Device Systems will help provide clarity for manufacturers, investigators and reviewers in the development of this important technology. It allows manufacturers and researchers to be innovative and flexible in how they develop studies. It also promotes greater communication between the FDA and manufacturers and researchers, which will support the rapid, safe and effective development of an APDS.

There have been tremendous strides made in the research and development of an APDS, and there are many research projects underway looking at the feasibility of these device systems in hospital settings. For more information on these and other clinical trials (the link to more details of the case examination is on the F.D.A. website.

On this website you can learn more about what an artificial pancreas device system is, research challenges associated with its development, and FDA’s ongoing commitment to a safe and effective artificial pancreas device system for patients with diabetes.
 

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Artificial Pancreas By MedTronics

Will you please add some more information once you situation allows to do so? I think this is very good and important issue and you are going to have one of these devices anyway. I would appreciate your information and input before and after the fact as well. Thank you for your quick response to my post.


I have an order in for one" MiniMed 530G with Enlite."

Supposedly it is 100% covered by my insurer, which is already nearly met for this year. We'll see!

However, this does NOT seem to be the same device as Gizmo is posting about ...
 

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Besides which, this thread is 2½ years old . . . if you have newer information, gofur, perhaps you could start a new thread. Welcome aboard.
 

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Here is the latest information I have found SO FAR :) It's all pretty much the same for reason of my first post. I didn't think of researching this until 3 weeks ago then Holiday Season Hit so sorry for the stale information. :)

Posted: Nov 28, 2013 6:57 PM CST
Updated: Dec 03, 2013 6:57 PM CST (MyFox)
http://www.myfoxphoenix.com/story/24093579/2013/11/28/medtronics-artificial-pancreas

It's the device so many diabetics have been waiting for -- an insulin pump which senses when your blood sugar is too low and stops pumping insulin.

The manufacturer, Medtronic -- calls this pump an artificial pancreas because a non-diabetic's pancreas does the same thing on its own.

The pump is this black box -- and, the white piece is the sensor on the patient's skin, which can shut the pump off.

Dr. Bruce Bode, a diabetes specialist -- says the device will keep patients safer and let them decide what sugar levels are best for them.

"..Obviously if you live with diabetes around the clock mainly type 1 diabetes when it's insulin independent, people have always been asking when are you going to cure diabetes. And so there's biological cures as well as artificial cures. And the first step in the artificial pancreases has just been approved by the FDA and that's a big milestone because this is something everybody's been waiting for. It's not a cure, it's just gonna help people live with diabetes better."

"..Yeah so this new system basically suspends insulin delivery when it crosses a certain glucose threshold that is defined as low. And in this system you can set that threshold anywhere from 60-90 milligrams per decimeter. So it's up to the individual patient and the healthcare professional to set this device. But the first step is just suspending insulin delivery, and that's what the pancreas does. If I gave you insulin and even though you don't have diabetes and I made your glucose low, your pancreas would automatically suspend its own insulin delivery."

Medtronic's artificial pancreas is the first device of its kind approved by the FDA.

Competing companies are developing similar products.
 

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This pump is a first step in a closed loop system in which insulin doses are administered based on blood glucose without the user having to input instructions, much as a pancreas does, but it is not an artificial pancreas. However, it is a big step. Also, I have it on good authority that an artificial pancreas is being tested. Probably a few years or more before it can be marketed, but I can't wait!
 

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It seems a little pretentious to call this thing an "artificial pancreas" unless it also emits glucagon in response to lows. Isn't it just a more accurate pump?
 
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I don't know, does an 'artificial' heart speed up with fear, anxiety, extreme happiness?
 

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I don't know, does an 'artificial' heart speed up with fear, anxiety, extreme happiness?
I don't know, but at least it's IN the body in the place where the heart goes, attached to the same veins and arteries. This thing is just a machine hooked to a needle injecting insulin, isn't it? How is that different from a pump?

I thought I had read about one that does both insulin and glucagon. That would be a little more reasonably called an "artificial pancreas", IMO. (More so, if it was actually inside the body attached to whatever the real pancreas is attached to.)
 

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My understanding is that what is being tested now is not that different than a pump and is worn outside the body. The difference is that it will calculate and administer insulin as your pancreas does so a person with diabetes can eat without considering insulin dosage, carbs, glycemic indexes, etc. Also, I don't know about the glucagon, but I know Medtronics currently has a pump that stops the basal dose when BG goes below a certain threshhold and starts again when the BG rises. That feature would be incorporated in the "artificial pancreas" I am sure. BUT, technology fails, breaks down, etc. so I am sure a person better be prepared with batteries, test strips, insulin, syringes, all the usual, as backup. I wonder if the thing requires 4x per day testing to calibrate?
 

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Low Glucose Threshold Pumps Versus Atificial Pancreas Projects

It seems a little pretentious to call this thing an "artificial pancreas" unless it also emits glucn in response to lows. Isn't it just a more accurate pump?
To clarify on this forum there is a difference in terms of what an Artificial Pancreas is versus a continuous infusion pump combined with a sensor is. The Medtronic 530G is a low glucose suspend system which suspends basal delivery of insulin based upon predictive alerts of the Enlite sensor. The challenges with these is the current accuracy rate of sensors based upon extracting glucose values from interstitial fluid or serous fluid is not clinically accurate enough to do this algorithm with absolute threshold accuracy. A low glucose suspend system just suspends delivery of basal insulin. It is not a guarantee the patient will not experience hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia.

True Artificial pancreas systems must administer insulin, use more accurate sensor technology and an algorithm for that person in conjunction with counter-regulatory hormones (glucagon, leptin, epinephrine) to maintain normal blood sugar levels in response to food, exercise, illness, stress and the other challenges a normal metabolic system compensates for.
 

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To clarify on this forum there is a difference in terms of what an Artificial Pancreas is versus a continuous infusion pump combined with a sensor is. The Medtronic 530G is a low glucose suspend system which suspends basal delivery of insulin based upon predictive alerts of the Enlite sensor. The challenges with these is the current accuracy rate of sensors based upon extracting glucose values from interstitial fluid or serous fluid is not clinically accurate enough to do this algorithm with absolute threshold accuracy. A low glucose suspend system just suspends delivery of basal insulin. It is not a guarantee the patient will not experience hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia.

True Artificial pancreas systems must administer insulin, use more accurate sensor technology and an algorithm for that person in conjunction with counter-regulatory hormones (glucagon, leptin, epinephrine) to maintain normal blood sugar levels in response to food, exercise, illness, stress and the other challenges a normal metabolic system compensates for.
Thanks. So, to date the differences are more accurate sensors and some kind of individualized predictive algorithm to stop insulin on the low end. And what is hoped for in the future is some kind of actual response to lows beyond suspending insulin infusion such as glucagon and the like. Right?

Do current "pump" systems adjust insulin rate according to BG?
 
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