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Discussion Starter #1
Hey,
I was wondering how often, if at all, you all test your blood glucose monitors with the control solution. My endo did not really talk much about it and I have seen various answers.
I am type 1 and test 4 to 6 times a day if usage makes any difference.
Thanks and sorry if this is a stupid question,
Josh
 

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Josh, there are no stupid questions. Ask whatever you want, at any time.

I use control solution when I first start using a meter, to make sure it is not defective. They could be damaged in the mail. I dropped one on a hard floor once and I tested it too. Otherwise, I do not use control solution at all. Maybe I should. My meters have given me reasonable numbers even when they are several years old. I also have a CGM now and it agrees with my meter rather closely, most of the time. The meters and the CGM can be a check on each other, as far as accuracy is concerned.
 

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I probably should do it more often. I test around 6-8 times a day usually. I think I last checked a control solution maybe 3 months ago. My readings are usually were I expect them to be so I dont really think about it. Maybe I will run one today since you have reminded me of it :) I am curious to see what others do.
 

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I was told to use the control solution when you start a new tube of strips. Other than that...you don't really need it unless you see a sudden and dramatic change in your numbers. You'll want to use the control solution to make sure you aren't getting false results.
 

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The meter I purchased didn't come with control solution & the Walmart where I purchased it didn't carry the solution either. I have not checked my meter because I have never had control solution. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
SO how do you guys know your meter is right, say like 2 months after an appointment when it gets checked at the Dr.?
Sorry, but I really don't want my meter to be wrong and have an issue because I treated something that didn't need to be treated.
I got a meter and checked it, and it was right. But my main question is how long this calibration lasts?
 

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SO how do you guys know your meter is right, say like 2 months after an appointment when it gets checked at the Dr.?
Sorry, but I really don't want my meter to be wrong and have an issue because I treated something that didn't need to be treated.
I got a meter and checked it, and it was right. But my main question is how long this calibration lasts?
I've had one meter for over 5 years and it's never failied calibration with the control solution.
The meter is only one test. If you get high results, your doctor will do a fasting and A1C test before you get treated for anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ok. Thanks. I really appreciate all the help. I'm sure I will be asking a lot more questions in the coming days.
Hopefully, one day, I will be able to contribute instead of simply benefiting.
 

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Whenever you have lab tests done, always take your meter with you & test at the time they draw blood. That's a better test anyhow.

Unless you drop your meter or otherwise damage it, it should be fine. I'm the one who has never even used control solution, but after a year I checked my meter against the lab results when I had my annual checkup and it was only two points different. I tested with my meter at the moment the lab tech drew blood and got 114. The lab came back with 112. There is essentially no difference in those two numbers, because legally a glucose meter can be 20% off either way, which kinda leaves us in the lurch to begin with. (that 20% variance means that readings of 80, 100 and 120 are all acceptable for one meter and one drop of blood, so you see the problem here).
 

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Whenever you have lab tests done, always take your meter with you & test at the time they draw blood. That's a better test anyhow.
What Shanny said.

I took my meter with me to my appointment today and compared my reading with theirs. My meter said 128, theirs said 119. (this is 2 hours after eating lunch, and 1 hour after eating a commercial bakery cookie!) So my meter runs a little bit high, but not unreasonably so. Further, it's a brand known for relative accuracy; it will give very close to the same reading for a given blood sugar level every time, so fluctuations in my readings do represent blood sugar fluctuations and not random glucometer shift. Some brands are bad that way.
 
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