The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone. I was diagnosed as Type 2 in 2009. I have had good years and bad years in controlling my own treatment. For the past year+ I have been using a Freestyle Libre sensor and it has done wonders for me. I used to have a Nurse Practitioner that would listen to all my theories and self-realizations about how MY body acts, instead of just taking the standard speech from dietitians. That NP is now gone and I always have strange questions to ask.

Here is my first one:
I am maintaining about an A1C of 6.6 right now (that includes 2 weeks of having COVID). I have noticed the entire time that I have been using the Freestyle sensor that my Blood Glucose almost never goes/stays low (under 80) for more than an hour before it starts to correct itself and climb back up. I do not need to eat/drink anything, or do anything at all and my BG will do back up on it's own.

So I don't really have a question there except can anyone explain to me what is going on and should I just be mindful to watch for that upswing before doing anything like having some sugar/candy/glucose tabs? How typical is this behavior that the BG evens itself back out?

Thanks.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
2,266 Posts
Hello, hooverbw. Welcome to the site!

I have to admit that self-correcting hypoglycemia is a new one on me. However, I will ask a clarifying question: When you experience these episodes, are you verifying the Libre's readings with another testing method? Do you have enough history tracking the Libre and readings from your usual testing location (likely your fingers) to know if the Libre tends to read accurately or high or low?

In any case, yes, I'd be careful about overdosing a response to the hypo. The usual advice is to take 15 grams of glucose and then wait 15 minutes. Otherwise you run the risk of a high number for ingesting more glucose than you needed to correct the hypo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, for weeks I compared the Libre's readings with my finger sticks. The reading were very close, except for the 15 minute or so gap between the readings. I use finger sticks to check whenever I feel that the reading might be wrong as well. I have had two "bad" sensors, but those were very far from my normal readings as well as muscle/nerve pains that to me indicated a bad placement. So short answer, yes I do check and confirm readings occasionally.

But I have many occasions where I have watched my BG drop below "normal" range, under 80, and then self-correct. As the Libre sensor is 15 minutes behind my actually BG I normally watch it or double-check against a finger stick before taking any action.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
2,266 Posts
Well, it sure sounds like you're handling it correctly. Let's see if anyone else here has experience with this. I suspect, as a T2, that you still have some pancreatic function and maybe there's something that's either depressing it to a point or something that kicks it into gear suddenly.

Not to turn this into 20 Questions, but what meds/insulin are you using and what's your dosage schedule? Any event you can think of that seems to correlate with these hypos (like extreme exertion or time of day or...??)?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,152 Posts
Hi hooverbw, welcome to the forum. Congrats on being proactive. We are, after all, our own best health advocates.

This may not be answering your question, but under 80 even under 70 is not a dangerous low BG, typically for type 2s. But it can be for either type if it is dropping rapidly. You didn't mention the rate yours was dropping, so I'm going to assume it wasn't rapid. I would think it would be a normal reaction in your case, and eating something to raise it back up would not be necessary. Our bodies regulate BG by signaling for more insulin to be released if BG goes up and signals for more glucose to be released if BG goes down. Your pancreas produces the insulin and your liver produces the glucose. This is kind of going on all the time. When you eat, the carbs (starches, sugars and some fiber) provide the glucose your cells use for energy. Some of the extra glucose gets converted to glycogen and stored in the liver (to be later converted back to glucose released when your BG gets lower) and what the liver doesn't convert to glycogen gets converted to triglycerides and stored as fat (to later be used as fuel for your cells when glucose may not be as available).

0nly about 5% of our cells in our bodies actually require glucose only for fuel, but with the body's ability to easily convert amino acids into glucose to provide that need, a bunch of carbs are not required.

Addendum Edit - the other 95% of our cells can function very well using fatty acids for fuel. That comes from fats we eat and that excess glucose that was converted and stored as fat I mentioned earlier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah forgot to mention meds. For the diabetes I am on Metformin 1000mg twice a day and Glipizide XL 5mg before breakfast.

If I am not crazy about what I eat, meaning about 10g of carbs or less per meal, then I can pretty much plot my BG values for the whole day. Bump above normal before I wake up, slight bump after lunch and then a moderate 200-250 spike after dinner, normally having a little bit of rice or pasta in a meal.

No direct correlation to the hypo events, but if I eat something that causes a sudden spike in BG then I can normally expect a just as sudden drop that takes me low. If I don't eat any kind of snack before bed then I can also expect to have a hypo event that self-corrects while I am sleeping. While sleeping those events last about am hour before correctly while the events during the day correct in about 30 minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Consider yourself fortunate that it corrects on it's own.

I've been type 1 for 38 years. I recently got a Dexcom G6 CGM and for the first time in my life can see the wild swings by BG goes through. The chart literally looks like a roller coaster most days. I got it because I had a near fatal low while sleeping a few months ago (camping in the middle of the woods 30 minutes from the nearest hospital or ambulance co.). The seizure I had woke up my wife who fortunately was able to get a cell signal and call 911. The paramedics measured my BG at 25. I regained consciousness when it got up to about 35.

I have no idea why my diabetes suddenly (and I mean literally overnight) turned so brittle as it was fairly well controlled up to that point.

The CGM has awakened me numerous times since then to grab some carbs in the middle of the night. I have it set to alert me below 70 during nighttime hours and 80 during the rest of the day. I could probably set it lower for the nighttime but I'm concerned if it were dropping sharply it might not give the carbs enough time to work. I find it normally takes me about 20 minutes after eating for the BG to reverse direction and go back up.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,152 Posts
Thanks Chuck for the comments. Do you still have awareness of your BG going low, I've heard over time many can lose that sense. CGM's are certainly game changes and life savers.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top