The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering…is it common for adult-diagnosed insulin-dependent diabetics to take a while to get blood sugar under control, even when doing a good job counting carb choices and insulin units? Like, can one still expect something of a roller coaster the first week, which subsides with time? My wife’s blood sugar seems to swing wildly (like, from 70 at one point in the day to well over 200 after dinner), even though she has been very deliberate about matching her consumption of carbs with units of insulin in pre-meal injections and taking the right amount of slow acting insulin. Does the body take a little while to adjust physiologically in going from a chronic hyperglycemic state to the point where it gets into the right rhythm with diet and insulin injections. It’s been frustrating so far. She's been trying so hard to do everything right and yet she isn't being rewarded with blood sugar readings where they should be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,911 Posts
I cannot say for certain, but I would not be surprised.

I had a T1.5 diagnosis, eventually.

From what I have read in peer-reviewed articles, prior to diagnosis, I had a beta-cell shutdown leading to DKA. Those cells that were still viable had ceased production of insulin, temporarily.

Once my BG was lowered, some of them began production again. So my response to food was unpredictable for about the first 4 - 6 months.

I would think that this same shutdown occurs in Type 1, as blood sugar rises, to the extent that there are remaining beta cells to recover (and in many cases there are).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,024 Posts
It can take a long time to adjust to insulin and have good control. Using carb counting and the proper insulin:carb ratio is very important. Does your wife do this? I need one unit of fast acting insulin for every 7 carbs I eat.That is called a 1:7 ratio. In the late evening my ratio changes to 1:10 and before breakfast it is 1:5, so the ratios can change during the day. Do you know your wife's ratio? It may be very different from mine. Insulin sensitivity levels are also very important. 1 unit of fast acting insulin will lower my blood sugar 12 points most of the day, but during the night it will bring me down 20-30 points, so the insulin sensitivities can vary too. These things, when well established, can give much better control.

If you wife does not take these things into account, she could make an appointment with a CDE (Certified Diabetes Educator) and learn a lot about proper insulin dosing. She can also purchase books like "Using Insulin" by John Walsh and "Think Like A Pancreas" by Gary Scheiner. You can buy them from amazon.com online.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Since my original post, my wife’s BG levels have gotten much better. There were just a couple days that were sort of frustrating. Her endocrinologist and diabetes educator are both quite impressed with how quickly she is getting the hang of it, so maybe she’s just too much of perfectionist. She does a really good job matching meals with insulin, and the resulting levels over the last few days have been really good. If she keeps this up, she’s likely to end up with a better A1C than I probably have (as a non-diabetic).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,024 Posts
I am pleased to hear that your wife is doing so well now. I have been a perfectionist with my diabetes management too. Maybe that is part of the reason I am doing so well after 65 years of diabetes. I hope your wife continues to get along well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
If she keeps this up, she’s likely to end up with a better A1C than I probably have (as a non-diabetic).
Oh that would be lovely! I can't think of a better goal! heheh! :D :D :D

Unless she's obsessed, I don't see how perfectionism can cause a problem here. When she's got a good regimen in place and continues to abide by it, it will become second nature. Can't argue with success! I hope she knows how much we're pulling for her here!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,557 Posts
mcgruff - Your wife is doing fantastic. Sometimes it isn't easy even for those of us who have had the big "D" for a long time. Keep on encouraging her as that means a lot to her I think. When I was first diagnosed my husband took on the role of "Food Police". Sometimes he still does that. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
mcgruff - Your wife is doing fantastic. Sometimes it isn't easy even for those of us who have had the big "D" for a long time. Keep on encouraging her as that means a lot to her I think. When I was first diagnosed my husband took on the role of "Food Police". Sometimes he still does that. :)
My sister used to be my "food police" and I firmly asked her to back off. She is not diabetic and feel she does not understand diabetes. She hasn't play "food police" since I asked her to stop. It was very annoying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,557 Posts
My DH is one of these people who is blessed with very good health for his age. To him sweets are something to be enjoyed in moderation and HE can control his desire for desserts. Me, on the other hand, I have a hard time controlling the hand that reaches for a cookie or a muffin. I guess my DH thinks it is his job to monitor what he sees me eating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
Sometimes I think these old fellas think we need protected & defended, and they're the knights in shining armor! lol! I gotta say though, mine is being very supportive eating all the low-carb dishes (although I haven't won him over to green bananas yet - just give me time! ;)) When I made the strawberry pie the other day, I noticed later that he had gone back for a second helping! heheh! And that dish was TOTALLY low-carbed, right down to the faux marshmallow creme from Walden Farms! Ha!

My DH is one of these people who is blessed with very good health for his age. To him sweets are something to be enjoyed in moderation and HE can control his desire for desserts. Me, on the other hand, I have a hard time controlling the hand that reaches for a cookie or a muffin. I guess my DH thinks it is his job to monitor what he sees me eating.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top