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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been cooking the Thanksgiving Turkey for the family for many years. For the past several years I have brine the turkey b4 smoking it.

Brining the turkey adds moisture and flavor to the bird. In the past my turkey could be very dry and bland at times, especially the white meat. I've always used gravy to solve that problem, but the brine now adds moisture and flavor to whole turkey and totally ends the dry turkey problem.

The brine I use is water, kosher salt, and brown sugar. The mixture adds the flavor and moisture to the meat through osmosis, but does not make the meat taste overly salty or sweet. Of course my problem now is the brown sugar. I ordered this product from Netrition.com...

Splenda Brown Sugar Blend

I buy a 14 pound turkey, thaw, remove the leg restraint, the giblets, and the neck. Trim away large areas of fat, excess skin and tail. Rinse thoroughly inside and out, and pat dry with paper towels.

The turkey is now ready for brining.

Find a container large enough to hold the turkey and will fit in your refrigerator. Determine how much brine you must prepare to completely submerge the turkey. ( about 2 gal.)

Basic Turkey Brine (double this recipe)

1 gallon cold water
1 cup Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt
1/2 cup dark brown sugar, packed (I plan on using the amount recommended for 1/2 cup on the sugar substitute label)

Mix in your container until dissolved. Makes 1 gallon of brine. Substitute 3/4 cup Morton Kosher Salt or 1/2 cup table salt for Diamond Crystal.

Use a 13 gal plastic trash bag inside your container. Put the turkey in breast side down. Pour the brine in the bag, twist the bag to remove air and make sure the turkey is totally covered. Kept turkey in refrigerator the entire brining process. Brine for 12 to 18 hours.

Remove the turkey from the brine rinse under cool running water and pat dry with paper towels. Apply a light coat of oil to the turkey, then sprinkle with your favorite rub inside and out, go light on the salt.

I smoke my bird but you can cook yours the way you normally do. If you have ever coked a dry turkey try brining.

bugg:phas been called a Turkey...:hungry:

My 2010 Thanksgiving turkey...

http://i461.photobucket.com/albums/qq333/Buggert21/Turkey and things/buttcanturkey2.jpg
 

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A foodie friend of mine who was stationed here at Ft. Leonard Wood a few years ago, tried brining her turkey but there just wasn't room in the fridge. What she wound up doing was sealing it in a 5-gallon bucket & locking it in the trunk of her car. These Missouri winters are cold enough that it was in no danger of spoiling! And it turned out just as moist & flavorful as you describe, Bugg! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Shanny I did my basic training at Fort Leonard Wood. Started in Oct of 1968 and stayed there about 18 weeks. I can't think of anything pleasant about Fort Leonard except leaving for a week at Christmas...LOL I remember that was the coldest winter of my life...

bugg:eek:Yes Drill Sargent ... never say "Sir" To a Drill Sargent...
 
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