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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone
I was diagnosed with type 2 about 4 weeks ago and at present I take Metformin 500 x 2 daily and next week it will increase to 3 daily.
Today I got up as usual and had a bowl of Special K with skimmed milk and a cup of tea this was at about 8.00am I had nothing again and at 11.15 I went very clammy and then started to sweat pretty well excessively so I had a cup of tea a banana, 1 square of diabetic chocolate a 3 rich tea biscuits as I am very new to this complain can anyone please advise me what was wrong with me and why this happened and did I do the correct thing in eating what I did and why didn't the tablets stop this from happening as this happened a few times before I was diagnosed, I have asked the nurse for a blood meter but she seems to avoid me having one and to be honest I don't really understand what my readings should be before or after meals.
Sorry it's a long message but any help would be very much appreciated
best regards
Barbara xx
 

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Welcome back, Barbara. If your nurse isn't forthcoming with a meter, my advice is to get one yourself from a drugstore or somewhere else. I don't know what is available in the UK, but many chain stores in the US carry their own brands of meters & strips for very low prices.

If you can't test when these spells come upon you, there is no way to know how to treat them. The metformin tablets do not work immediately like many drugs. You must take them regularly and it takes several weeks for it to build up in your system. But they ARE working, so don't stop taking them.

You will need to adjust your diet quite a bit until you know how foods affect you. I think the cereal, milk, bananas and biscuits are not helping you right now. These are foods which many diabetics cannot eat because they elevate our blood sugars.

Try to avoid eating any foods made with white flour and/or white sugar. Also avoid rice, pasta, potatoes & bread for the time being.

Try to get a meter as soon as you can - don't wait for the nurse to give you one. Also get a carb counter book, so you can look up the carbohydrate content of different foods. It all seems terribly overwhelming at the beginning, but as your metformin begins to build up in your bloodstream, and you begin to limit your carb intake a bit, you'll begin to feel much better as your sugar levels drop.

Diabetics who keep tight control of their sugars often try to stay around 5 or 6 mmol/l and keep their after-meal readings under 7 or 7.5 . . . but you need a meter to monitor this, so that's why it's important that you not wait on the nurse to give you one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome back, Barbara. If your nurse isn't forthcoming with a meter, my advice is to get one yourself from a drugstore or somewhere else. I don't know what is available in the UK, but many chain stores in the US carry their own brands of meters & strips for very low prices.

If you can't test when these spells come upon you, there is no way to know how to treat them. The metformin tablets do not work immediately like many drugs. You must take them regularly and it takes several weeks for it to build up in your system. But they ARE working, so don't stop taking them.

You will need to adjust your diet quite a bit until you know how foods affect you. I think the cereal, milk, bananas and biscuits are not helping you right now. These are foods which many diabetics cannot eat because they elevate our blood sugars.

Try to avoid eating any foods made with white flour and/or white sugar. Also avoid rice, pasta, potatoes & bread for the time being.

Try to get a meter as soon as you can - don't wait for the nurse to give you one. Also get a carb counter book, so you can look up the carbohydrate content of different foods. It all seems terribly overwhelming at the beginning, but as your metformin begins to build up in your bloodstream, and you begin to limit your carb intake a bit, you'll begin to feel much better as your sugar levels drop.

Diabetics who keep tight control of their sugars often try to stay around 5 or 6 mmol/l and keep their after-meal readings under 7 or 7.5 . . . but you need a meter to monitor this, so that's why it's important that you not wait on the nurse to give you one.
Hi Shanny
Thank you again for your kind help I will purchase a meter and strips etc tomorrow
kind regards
Barbara xx
 

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I dont know if in the UK the foods have nutrition labels, if they do you need to read them.

Your diabetic, your pancreas no longer controls your Blood Sugar Levels BGL, So…You need to control your BGL.

It can be done
your tools

Pills and or insulin
exercise
Food

Read the labels on food packages.
you are interested in the TOTAL Carbohydrates. (in the US) dont know about labels in the UK
get to know the Glycemic index of foods.
http://www.mendosa.com/gilists.htm



Food
All foods with carbohydrates (carbs) Raises BGL
especially fast acting carbs are
almost anything white. White bread, potato, rice, sugar (eating a bowl of mashed potato is worse than eating a bowl of sugar as far as BGL goes.)

Protein, fiber and fat
slows down the rise of BGL.

meds (pills and insulin)
lower BSL

exercise
lowers BSL



Basically those are the tools you have, use them well and you will have a long Happy life.

To learn HOW THIS ALL AFFECTS YOU… test you BGL before you eat, test 1 hour after you eat, this gives you your BGL spike for the food. Test 2 hours after you eat your BGL should be going down. test before exercise test after exercise.
Everybody is affected differently by carbs and by different foods. So you need to test to find out how You react to different foods


 

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Most companies here in Canada will give you the meter for free if you get the strips. Ask your pharmacist. Also you can get coupons online for meters. You really need to test when you get a spell like that because it could be that you went to high or too low. If it was because you were to low than you did the right thing by eating. If you are too high you basically have to wait for it to come back down. Also when you are starting to treat high sugars, you will feel bad as your sugars start to come down as your body is used to the high sugars. You may feel like you are low when you are not so testing is extra important at this time.

Good Luck :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you so much for aking the time to help me I will take on board all your help, at present I am totally confused, I find trying to get my head round diabetes like a mindfield
kind regards
Barbara x
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hello Jackie
Thank you for giving me your valued oppinion, I am very surprised to see that I would feel like this on a high as well as a low count, now I see why a meter is essential, I'm going out today to purchase everything that I require, unfortunately, we have to purchase all of our equipment in my particular area of the uk but it pretty much is dependant on where you live as different primary health care trusts have different guidelines
kind regards
Barbara xx
 
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