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Hi everyone, I have been really obsessed with my weight problem. I am a 33 year old female and have gained 90lbs which makes the count to 210. I recently took out some of my summer clothes and they don?t fit me anymore!!! This is a real tragedy for me. How can I not wear the ones I adore...moreover the new look is getting me mad (with the comments from my friends). I know quite a few ways to start losing weight??.but I don?t really feel that, with so many people failing using these methods that I will make it through. Does anyone know a proven way to reduce the weight?

Please help me?..this is killing me!!!
 

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Discipline.

Hello Sinerita :), I too is too fat :( and I feel that diet & exercise is the go and also may have to adjust the insulin too as you get into a regime.
Also look at what you are eating as looking at food is fuel to exercise and don't be afraid of sweat!!! and drink water too as you go and do the exercise. :D
 

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I have been the same weight for years and I think I aquire that by not overeating and keeping active. Is your insulin set correctly so you don't have to eat to feed the insulin you take to bring up lows? I wish you good luck.
 

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Re:

You need to go to therapy to find out what the underlying cause may be. it has to be more than a craving...maybe a hormone imbalance or something medically or mentally out of whack. you need to start exercising and eat fresh fruits/vegies, berries and fiber when you want to eat the junk food. occupy your time with reading, walking, hanging out with friends, etc. attend church. having God on your side always helps!!!!
 

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I would suggest going to your Dr. and having him run some simple blood tests to make sure that it is not a medical problem that has made you gain weight. I would also check into your diet.. the types/amounts of foods your eating. I read someone suggested making sure that your eating properly to balance out the insulin your using. Good Luck to you and keep us all informed
 

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Oz D.A.F.N.E

I have nearly finished the course and I like and understand this and I don't have to chase the insulin that makes you fat. :D

Do you have this problem?
 

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I am not sure if the weight that I have put back on is due to being happy or due to diabetes.. I am now 125lbs and pretty happy with this weight.. I have more problem with feeling "bloated" now though.. don't know what that could be from either overeating (though don't feel I do ) or if my stomach is just happy to be able to eat again without feeling sick...
 

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Sounds healthy

Meg, I think you must have good control of your diabetes if you have gained needed weight and are happy and feeling good. Congratulations! You will adjust to your new weight and feel great. Stay healthy! Good luck!

Richard ;)
 

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Losing weight?

I've always found the OLD Weight Watchers eating plan is best for me. I can't be doing with having a regime that "allows" you to eat cream cakes etc. as the new ww does with it's points system. Just need the willpower to keep to it - that's the defining factor in anything!
All the best to anyone struggling with this wretched enemy.:rolleyes:
 

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I've always found the OLD Weight Watchers eating plan is best for me. I can't be doing with having a regime that "allows" you to eat cream cakes etc. as the new ww does with it's points system. Just need the willpower to keep to it - that's the defining factor in anything!
All the best to anyone struggling with this wretched enemy.:rolleyes:
I am a lifetime member of Weight Watchers. I have lost the same 60 pounds several times. I lack willpower. I will always return to their plan because of the flexibility. 1200 calorie diet has worked well for me.
 

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My weight has dropped slowly as I've altered my diet to attain stable blood sugars. I haven't truly focused on the weight loss aspect, but have enjoyed it as a nice fringe benefit, even though it's been very gradual (prob'ly about 2 lbs. a month). My diet is mostly protein & fats, with high fiber veggies like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, etc.

My success with following other peoples' programs was always limited . . . maybe I just don't like being told either, foxy! :eek:hwell: I quit smoking many years ago by just stopping. Never lighting up again. If I could stop eating, and just never take another bite, I'd be thin! ;) Apparently I can take it or leave it, but the inbetween part gives me trouble! Anyhow, it's struggle for sure.
 

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Hi Sinerita,
How much do you weigh? Before I was diagnosed with diabetes, I weighed 125 pounds. Once I was diagnosed and put on meds, I put on weight. I am not saying that it was the meds. Even on meds, you still have to watch your diet and exercise. I have learned that the meds do not do it for you, weight wise.

My weight slowly went up to over 200 pounds after I was diagnosed. I am now down to 150. I started watching more carefully what I ate. I eat only 150 carbs a day and I exercise and go for walks. I started going for 4 mile walks 3 times a week. I exercise at home with my DVD for 30 minutes a day.

Do not try to lose weight too fast. You have to have a lifetime eating plan and exercise plan. Now is the perfect time of year to go out and do gardening. Keep busy and do things.

Ruth
 

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In general, the best way to lose weight is to reduce caloric intake and increase activity.

One recent study's results indicated that T2s with impaired insulin production lost more weight by reducing carb intake than by reducing fat intake, when done as part of a program that modified behavior.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100619173919.htm

This study reconfirms the research upon which the original Atkins diet was based, more than 30 years ago. (Atkins took it to an extreme and later had to modify their program.)

Since you have type 2, and I have type 1, our situations are different, but I know that if I chronically take too much insulin it increases my appetite and I gain weight. If I don't get enough insulin I lose weight. It seems logical to to me that any medication that increased insulin production or insulin utilization would have the same effect on someone with type 2. ie too much medication > weight gain.

I found that I lost weight when I reduced my daily basal insulin by 1 unit and adjusted my lowered carb intake instead of raising my basal insulin to reach my target BG levels. I had to weigh all my food food instead of estimating portions and do extra postprandial BG readings to get this to work. I lost 30# over 90 days.

Talk to your doctor about reducing your oral diabetic medication dosage.
 

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As regards this forum, I think your second declaration is the more apropos. My experience IS that low-carb and moderate fat DO bring about weight loss. Non-insulin-dependent diabetics wind up with precious little left to eat when they try to reduce and carbs AND calories both. And for NIDs on metformin - I have found that met curbs my appetite also.

In general, the best way to lose weight is to reduce caloric intake and increase activity.

One study's results indicated that T2s with impaired insulin production lost more weight by reducing carb intake than by reducing fat intake.

As a T1, I found that I lost weight faster when I reduced my basal insulin by 1 unit per week each month and adjusted my carb intake instead of my basal insulin to reach my target BG levels. I had to weigh all my food food instead of estimating portions and do extra post prandial BG readings to get this to work, but I lost 30# over 90 days.
 

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As regards this forum, I think your second declaration is the more apropos. My experience IS that low-carb and moderate fat DO bring about weight loss. Non-insulin-dependent diabetics wind up with precious little left to eat when they try to reduce and carbs AND calories both. And for NIDs on metformin - I have found that met curbs my appetite also.
When what you believe is based only on your personal experience, it's may be interesting, but not applicable to anyone else.

Unless you intentionally create a metabolic disturbance, the only way to reduce body mass is to somehow reduce total caloric intake or increase activity. That's Biology 101.

There's no secret to a successful diet. It's a change to a new lifestyle that can be maintained for a lifetime, but the changes are made gradually. Dramatic overnight changes in activity or intake almost always fail because of side effects or habits.

The study didn't dramatically reduce total calories; it rebalanced the diet so a lower percentage of calories came from carbs. The caloric reductions were done gradually.

My diet change was also gradual. My initial reduction in medication was about 3% - hardly enough to be noticeable. I weighed what I ate to become more conscious of what I was doing. I didn't change what I ate, just ate a little less and only when I was hungry. This isn't rocket science.
 

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Since I'm not in the business of teaching/lecturing people on what is and what isn't, and what this or that study allegedly proves, my personal experience is what I have to offer, and if it works for me, it could work for others. All of your studies are nothing more than researchers watching the personal experiences of the subjects they've chosen for their particular project.

Since I am a type 2 and you are a type 1, our experiences no doubt differ greatly, but you're purpose in this forum is no different than mine - not to separate the wheat from the chaff either - but to relate what works for you. Whatever you've read somewhere else and the conclusions you've drawn, is of no consequence to us - we can go "somewhere else" ourselves, read the same studies/newsletters/articles as you have, and draw our own conclusions.

Furthermore, I was agreeing with you in that last post - at least I was agreeing with what you said your study said, so thank you for thanking me.
 

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weight management for a T2 is rocket science

Work your muscles post meals (45-60 minutes after) to soak up sugar. Balance carbs with muscle work to suppress highs to <140. Once sugar inside muscle, can never see fat cell again.

DON"T EAT LATE!! Fast for 3 hours before bed, never violate if you want to lose. Handful of sunflower seeds maybe 2 hours before bed.

Do muscle work (stairs, incline treadmill) with some frequency throughout day, impulses of 2 minutes until you are slightly huffy, take break, repeat. Don't go for over 3 hours without a muscle contraction break.

It is hard work, figuring out what works for you. But guidelines above should help alot. By the way, dark choc still on the menu, just make sure portion small. Suck on a small piece as you do muscle work?:D
 

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Chocolate/exercise??

Kathleen - Fair play to you for having such a good routine. However, unfortunately three of the points you make are an absolute NoNo for me. Firstly, I cannot do much exercising as I have a very bad back being spinabifida and am often in a great deal of pain, hardly being able to get out of bed sometimes! Secondly,because of the tablets I take for the pain I MUST eat something first so that rules out having a meals plan timingwise, even to the point that I need to take tablets in the middle of the night, and thirdly, I can't eat chocolate, especially dark choc, as I suffer from migraines from that.

As Shanny has so righly said, we all have to follow what suits us best and that is definitely not for me!!

Again I have to say, unfortunately I didn't have the problem of fitting in medications in years past which messes up my plans so much that it's hard to keep positive. :confused:
 
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