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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi friends,

I'm from India. My father is Diabetic. We purchased a glucometer recently so he could monitor his Blood glucose levels himself. Recently, my father went to his doctor for a regular checkup, where his blood glucose level was measured by the doctor. The recorded reading was 215 Mg/dL. When he returned home, he did another test in his glucometer. To his surprise the glucometer read 125 mg/dL!! In order to cross check he took another test on his glucometer. Now it showed 95 mg/dL!! This concerned him and he called up the agent who sold him this glucometer and reported this case. The sales agent told him that on successive blood sugar level tests, the readings could vary. However the agent had no good answer when we said that the variation is close to around 100mg/dL. Not convinced we asked the agent to replace the glucometer. The agent took it and returned it back to us after a few days saying that he has repaired it (calibrated it) so that it gives correct readings now. However, I am not too convinced as I dont think this unit can be calibrated, as it is pretty much micro-chip driven. I googled the internet enough to see similary such cases, but without any luck :(

I'd like to know if this agent is speaking the truth or is just plain lying. Moreover, I do not want my father to depend on a faulty glucometer. His daily planning is dependant on it. Can someone go calibrating a glucometer when a fault is reported? Pls share your thoughts. Any help is highly appreciated.
 

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Hi friends,

I'm from India. My father is Diabetic. We purchased a glucometer recently so he could monitor his Blood glucose levels himself. Recently, my father went to his doctor for a regular checkup, where his blood glucose level was measured by the doctor. The recorded reading was 215 Mg/dL. When he returned home, he did another test in his glucometer. To his surprise the glucometer read 125 mg/dL!! In order to cross check he took another test on his glucometer. Now it showed 95 mg/dL!! This concerned him and he called up the agent who sold him this glucometer and reported this case. The sales agent told him that on successive blood sugar level tests, the readings could vary. However the agent had no good answer when we said that the variation is close to around 100mg/dL. Not convinced we asked the agent to replace the glucometer. The agent took it and returned it back to us after a few days saying that he has repaired it (calibrated it) so that it gives correct readings now. However, I am not too convinced as I dont think this unit can be calibrated, as it is pretty much micro-chip driven. I googled the internet enough to see similary such cases, but without any luck :(

I'd like to know if this agent is speaking the truth or is just plain lying. Moreover, I do not want my father to depend on a faulty glucometer. His daily planning is dependant on it. Can someone go calibrating a glucometer when a fault is reported? Pls share your thoughts. Any help is highly appreciated.
It would be helpful to know the make and model number of your fathers meter, but you kept that a secret. My J&J Ultra Mini calibrates using test fluid that contains trace amounts of glucose. A drop is applied to the test strip and the result must fall between the test numbers indicated on the test
strip vial.
I suggest you Google search for the user guide for your father's meters to see and learn how its calibrated.
 

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Hi Susan,

Thanks so much for your response. The model is EZ Test from Braun.

I have googled the net for the product's guide. Its not on the net :(

I fyou have any data on this model, kindly pass on.

thanks again!

Cheers
 

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Hi Susan,

Thanks so much for your response. The model is EZ Test from Braun.

I have googled the net for the product's guide. Its not on the net :(

I fyou have any data on this model, kindly pass on.

thanks again!

Cheers
If you can't find it on the Internet the make/model number is incorrect. Take a much closer look for identification marks. If you Google "braun indian glucose meters" the first few hits are on a worldwide report for glucose meters and strips marketed in India. Braun is not listed nor does B.Braun Medical make a glucose meter.
 

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It would be helpful to know the make and model number of your fathers meter, but you kept that a secret. My J&J Ultra Mini calibrates using test fluid that contains trace amounts of glucose. A drop is applied to the test strip and the result must fall between the test numbers indicated on the test
strip vial.
This is only a test to verify that the strips are okay to use. It doesn't calibrate the meter at all. There are codes that need to be set for some meters, and its likely that this code check was not done, which makes for some wild numbers. This I know from experience. :)

I don't know everything about every glucose meter, but never heard of one that can be calibrated at all. They are either accurate enough by design (within 20%) or they have to be replaced.

It would be wonderful if there was a liquid that simulated an exact glucose number, so it could be compared to what the meter reads when the fluid is applied, but nothing like that seems to exist.

Wanting to be corrected, but there is no way to know how accurate a meter is. Even testing during an A1c test will not work. As was pointed out, the readings change in a matter of minutes, not unlike blood pressure readings. Meters are only good for observing trends, not for accurately telling your BG numbers.

When I had my last A1c test, they did a finger test with I believe, a Bayer meter, and it read 108, but the test data returned from the lab and said my fasting BG was 124. Big difference, about 20%, no explanation other than these fairly cheap meters are not of much value if we are shooting for a target that has no tolerance, such as that magic 140 that has been set up as the problem point.

If someone tests at 200, with a tolerance of 20%, that reading could be as low as 160, and testing with another meter, a half hour later, and getting a 100, could be a 120 using 20%, so 160 to 120 in thirty minutes is hardly that big a deal.

Its easy to see that our meters are not to be used to tell us what our BG is, but how far it rises when we eat, and to give a baseline for when we fast. To depend upon them for accurate numbers, may be a mistake, imo.

John
 

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Thanks John for all the inputs...it helps to understand that glocometers are not always accurate.
Dear Biswajith,

Giving you the basic facts:

(1) Generally Glucometers are calibrated at the time of production and recalibration is NOT done as a service procedure.

(2) Most Glucometers in India are imported and have no SERVICE facilities leave apart calibration. Only one brand is manufactured in India. Some brands claim as made in India but are imports and rebranded and sold here.

(3) All reading problems are generally due to strips and NOT meter. That is why control solutions are given.

(3) All brand of strips imported or local are to be stored under 30-32 deg centigrade temp as marked on the package. So if you ambience temperature exceeds this strips may give unreliable readings. even control solutions have their own restrictions. Temp/ llife....

(4) These strips have to be used within 90-120 days of opening the vial else the reading can again be unreliable.

(5) Imported strips have not been designed for Harsh Indian temperatures.

(6) Do not blindly rely on lab readings. These articles should enlighten you: Google search "ERRORS IN PATHOLOGY REPORTS"

(7) Specifically, with the values obtained b y you the information furnished are incomplete to explain the veracity of the readings. Was the doctor’s value of 250 taken on a Glucometers, was it PP? Random? FBS, What time and if random/ PP, what time difference was there between the last oral intake and test?

(8) Glucometers are generally accurate within 20%. The variation described by you cannot be due to a Glucometers fault but likely due to variation in other test parameters or strips not stored properly.

Cheers :)
 
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