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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My name is Tiffany I'am 30yrs old I was told I had gest.diabetes when I was bout 7mo.pregnant with my twin boys that will be 5 June 29th.Twins were 6mo.old and my vision was blurry and thirstie and so on so I decided to checkmy sugar it was 515.Went to ER told me I had type 2.2yrs later doc ran test and said type 1.I avoid goin to docs cuz I end up cryi.Ive been thru atleast 4 doctors.My last doc said I was the most hardheaded diabetic he ever met.If I dont take charge Im gona end up wishing I had.Nobody in my family has diabetes.
 

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Hi Tiffany and Welcome. I think denial, anger, sorrow and all the rest are common reactions to this diagnosis but glad that you have taken the step of joining this forum. Plenty of support and experience on tap.

Please stay around, read, share, cry, rant even and ask questions :)
 

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Hi, Tiffany. I am so sorry for your diagnostic confusion.

Really the way to end the bull-hockey is to get that antibody testing.

This disease is hard enough to deal with, without medical professionals goofing around ... but they DO.

I hope you can firstly get your blood sugars under control, and secondly get your feelings under control about it. Autoimmune diseases are more commonly triggered during pregnancy, not just Type 2!

I hope you can enjoy your twins -- I was diagnosed when my kids were 8, 6, and 5, and they were what helped me through the diagnosis and coming to terms with D.

I have adult-onset T1.5 D -- both antibodies and IR. And I had no family history, either. Just hypothyroidism, long-standing. I use both basal and mealtime insulin, and frankly I feel in much better control of my diabetes and my life, since trying it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for your reply. I also have thyroid problems I take125mcg of Levothyroxine everyday.Do u think I should get test to make sure its not type 1.5???
 

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No -- it almost certainly is LADA if you had previous antibody testing.

It is not a death sentence -- truly -- and if you hang out here, you will get help managing it!
 

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Probably if you have co-existing thyroid disease. But if you have not, get antibody testing.

LADA is also not the end of the world.

What do you eat?
 

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LADA is slow onset type 1, which usually starts in adulthood. Many are dx'd as type 2's and when the normal things don't work, additional testing shows they have antibodies. Sometimes in the beginning LADA's still have enough insulin production that they can function without injected insulin but eventually as beta cells are attacked and destroyed, both kinds of insulin are usually needed.
 

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This article indicates the importance of using insulin for control -- if not beta cell preservation -- in LADA:

Eur J Endocrinol. 2011 Feb;164(2):239-45. Epub 2010 Nov 18.
β-cell function and metabolic control in latent autoimmune diabetes in adults with early insulin versus conventional treatment: a 3-year follow-up.
Thunander M, Thorgeirsson H, Törn C, Petersson C, Landin-Olsson M.
Source

Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. [email protected]
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:

The optimal treatment of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is not established. We explored whether early insulin treatment, which has shown beneficial effects in rodents and in human pilot studies, would result in better preservation of β-cell function or metabolic control, compared with conventional treatment.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

Glucagon-stimulated C-peptide and HbAlc were evaluated at baseline and after 12, 24 and 36 months in 37 patients recently diagnosed with diabetes, aged ≥ 30 years, non-insulin-requiring and GADAb and/or ICA positive. Twenty patients received early insulin and 17 received conventional treatment (diet ± oral hypoglycaemic agents (OHA), metformin, some and/or sulfonylurea) and insulin when necessary. RESUlts: Level of metabolic control, HbAlc, was preserved in the early insulin treated, while it significantly deteriorated in the conventionally treated. There was no significant difference between the groups in C-peptide after 12, 24 or 36 months, or in the decline of C-peptide. Only baseline C-peptide predicted a C-peptide of ≥ 0.5 nmol/l at 36 months. Gender, body mass index, antibody titres or HbAlc did not influence the levels of C-peptide or HbAlc at baseline or end-of-study, or the decline in C-peptide. Among the diet ± OHA-treated, 5/17 (30%) developed insulin dependency during the follow-up. No major hypoglycaemic events occurred.
CONCLUSIONS:

Early insulin treatment in LADA leads to better preservation of metabolic control and was safe. Superior preservation of C-peptide could not be significantly demonstrated. Only baseline level of C-peptide significantly influenced C-peptide level after 3 years. Further studies exploring the best treatment in LADA are warranted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ill tell u rite now I dont watch what I eat and never really check my sugar.When I had to start shots I went almost a year b4 I finally started taking it.Being told that I have diabetes is a very tramanic thing for me and so overwhelming.
 

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When I was in high school I watched a diabetic woman in her 70's die very slowly for gangrene.

I was more than happy to modify my diet, exercise, and use insulin, once I was diagnosed. There was no way I was going to put my kids through that.

I have 2 kids with developmental disabilities (one Autism spectrum, the other ADHD, but severe) -- I MUST be in good health long enough to get them able to function independently. There was simply no choice as far as I was concerned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Im not try n to down myself but I wish I could b strong headed like that.Thats really the thing Im try n to work on cuz if I dont become a stronger person my kids will not have a mother.Why do u think it so hard for me? I havent met anyone having hardtime with diabete but I dont know that many.
 

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I think you will find many folks here who can relate to feelings of being overwhelmed or helpless either shortly after diagnosis or at any stage after -- it is a life-changing event but it can and does get easier to manage. Ultimately you may find (as I now do) that BG testing, shots, meal planning etc... become as second nature as brushing teeth.

You have taken the first step by joining here, but although there is a great deal to do, don't feel like it all has to happen at once. This is a race won by tortoises.

For me knowledge is power, so I poured my energy into reading and learning as much as I can about my condition, and about myself by testing BGs... keeping a log of meals/snacks, BGs, activity, how I felt etc... looking for repeatable patterns over days, weeks and months.

---

Edited to add...

Also worth noting that if your BGs are currently high or on a roller-coaster (highs and lows in rapid succession) you will likely feel one heck of a lot better once you get them stable and under control -- many describe it like coming out of a fog into clear daylight for the first time in a long time.

I have a son (he is 20 now) and wanting to see him grow and one day run around after any grandchildren, provided me with great motivation at first (still does) but ultimately I decided that it was worth doing this for me as well.
 
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It is devistating enough to be diagnosed with Diabetes, and you have been hit with several things at once. But fgummett is right, when it comes to Diabetes and its complications, knowledge is power. Some of us have thyroid disease and LADA and some have experience with all types of meds, and some have ended up with super high bg and landed in the emergency room. So just keep asking questions until all have been answered and you have the info. you need to get and keep this under control. Don't worry about asking too many questions and don't hesitate to ask a question because you think it might be 'dumb'. There are no dumb questions and we are here to help.

In the meantime, I recommend you cut way down on carbohydrates, until you can find a diet plan that works for you. I'm glad you found us.
 

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When I was first dx'd I had no idea what I was dealing with. No one in my family was diabetic and I really didn't know any friends that were diabetic. My doctor was not much help and didn't seem overly concerned. That is when I decided to inform myself. For almost 2 years I fumbled around bookstores, libraries and the internet. I was overwhelmed with information. Then 2 years into diabetes I found online forums. It was like all of a sudden things made sense. I finally understood what was going on in my D body. I learned how to Eat to my Meter. My doctor had never discussed that with me. I learned how to find alternative ways to cook to keep bgs low. I'm not saying it is easy but you have a lot of support here to help you. I have 5 kids, the last just graduated from college last week. So I want to be here for their weddings, grandchildren and their graduations. Diabetes can be managed with a few tweaks . The important thing is that you need to take control, not your doctor. Something someone wrote awhile ago really struck me. You are the Chairman of the Board, when it comes to your diabetes. You start one meal at a time, if you fail, then you start all over again. No one is judging you. You are doing this for yourself and your family. I never thought I could deal with this either, but when you are faced with it, you find you are stronger than you thought.
 

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Hello Tiffany, and welcome. Everyone's suggestions are right on, so I won't repeat. I do urge you to take control as soon as possible.

I have no doubt that EVERY diabetic has a hard time somewhere along the way and you only have to be strong-headed for one moment at a time. During the moment that you contemplate choosing the cheese stick instead of the cupcake, be very strong & choose the cheese stick. Then relax until the next temptation presents itself. And you can control the frequency of the temptations by ridding your house of tempting food items. Choose low/zero carb foods when you grocery shop.

There is support here by the truckload, so stay with us & read the old threads too . . . you'll find all of our trials & temptations thrashed out & conquered. You can do this and we can help!

Thank you for joining us!
 

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Big hugs TMK. I haven't got any words of wisdom but just want to encourage you to take some time reading the threads on this forum. You'll be able to get practical advice from some people here who are essentially experts in managing their diabetes.

With all that's going on with you at the moment, it's no wonder you are confused and grappling with it all and if you are suffering depression on top of that, you're bound to feel overwhelmed.

Perhaps just small steps toward good diabetic health. A little positive change here and there everyday will eventually add up to where you are feeling better.
 
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