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Here in Australia we don't have insurance coverage for CGMs (grrr) but I can see what an advantage they would be and am thinking of self funding.

I use an accu-chek pump but since the CGM would be independent of the pump it really isn't important what make CGM I go for.

This gets me to my point - can any of you give me any advice on which works best for you and what to be aware of (apart from the cost!!!)

I am trying to understand how they operate. I guess they have a remote screen thingy which the CGM transmits to but does that always have to be within range or will it catch up when you come back into range like the meter/remote for my pump?
 

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All have another canulla to be inserted by which the CGM reads glucose interstitially, not by blood. The canulla has to be replaced approximately every 7 days.

Mine (Dexcom G4) takes a reading every five minutes that gets stored in a small electric receiver to be kept within 20' of the body. It alarms whenever glucose goes above or below points that can be set by the user.

Be cautioned that those interstitial readings are not as accurate as finger sticks, so you'll still want to test before bolusing.

It's great if you're hypo unaware though or just want to do a quick check any time like before driving. Also very useful in determining trends.

Mine has saved me many times and I wouldn't want to be without it!
 

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OK, thanks, I think I am slowly getting my head around it. What happens if you are out of range, say swimming?
 

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Then you're out of range. The CGM resumes recording when you're back in range. The receivers are definitely not waterproof, at least not Dexcom's. I think Medtronic's is integrated, but then you have to remove it and the pump to avoid all water.
 

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I don't remove my Dexcom sensor (cannula) every 7 days. I press the 'stop sensor' button, then immediately press the 'start sensor' button without removing the sensor or the transmitter. On average I can usually get anywhere from 11-18 days from one sensor. In the U.S. Medicare does not cover the CGMs so my Dexcom is "out of pocket" expense.
 
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I don't remove my Dexcom sensor (cannula) every 7 days. I press the 'stop sensor' button, then immediately press the 'start sensor' button without removing the sensor or the transmitter. On average I can usually get anywhere from 11-18 days from one sensor. In the U.S. Medicare does not cover the CGMs so my Dexcom is "out of pocket" expense.
I've heard of this and tried it several times without success.

I'm inclined to have frequent forays over 300 and have the impression that Dexcom goes a little nuts with high glucose.

Do you do the same? I hear some people are getting upwards of a month from a sensor (I guess 18 days is pretty close!).
 

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I've heard of this and tried it several times without success.

I'm inclined to have frequent forays over 300 and have the impression that Dexcom goes a little nuts with high glucose.

Do you do the same? I hear some people are getting upwards of a month from a sensor (I guess 18 days is pretty close!).
I've had Dexcom for 7 years and in that time it would be dishonest of me to say I've never had a foray into the 300 or even 400 mark range. The higher numbers happen usually when I was coming down sick with a cold, the flu or even more recently, shingles.

That said, I think Dexcom goes "nuts" when the numbers go up or down really quick (at least that has been my experience). It seems to me that the sensor has trouble figuring out just exactly what our BG number is. You also have to keep in mind that Dexcom doesn't give the exact blood glucose number. It is about 5 minutes or so behind real-time BGs.

I'm not trying to 'bad-mouth' the OmniPod, but I had much more trouble with my BG numbers and Dexcom numbers with that system. It works beautifully for some people, I'm just not one of those people!

It is rare for me to not get at least 14 days out of a sensor and even more rare not to get 7 days. I recently had a sensor that "failed" after 3 days. However I called Dexcom (as they are guaranteed for 7 days) and they sent a replacement within 3-5 business days.

Because Dexcom is a self-pay thing with me I feel I must get as much time from each sensor as I can. I am probably considered a "tight-wad" where money is concerned and that is the main reason I use the system as long as I can.
 

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Here in Australia we don't have insurance coverage for CGMs (grrr) but I can see what an advantage they would be and am thinking of self funding.

I use an accu-chek pump but since the CGM would be independent of the pump it really isn't important what make CGM I go for.

This gets me to my point - can any of you give me any advice on which works best for you and what to be aware of (apart from the cost!!!)

I am trying to understand how they operate. I guess they have a remote screen thingy which the CGM transmits to but does that always have to be within range or will it catch up when you come back into range like the meter/remote for my pump?
You could check out Ascensia. They sell CGM systems. And they have a program where they will engage with insurance companies and make the case for reimbursement.
 
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