The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im seeing a lot of information on this forum about clinical trials for diabetes. I have had friends complete these studies in the past, but im curious, what is everyone's opinion in this matter?
 
G

·
In Some Respects Clinical Trials Aren't Good..!!

Clinical trials have their place in life, but then again depending upon the situation and circumstances, they sometimes can do more harm than good.

Let's say you have a borderline medical problem and are now taking "X" medication to keep it under control. It has been suggested that a new "YZ" medication will help you to not only keep from it becoming full blown, but reduce the possibility of it becoming a bigger problem.

As part of the clinical trial test group, some of you are going to be taking the new "YZ" medication.. while the others will be getting a "placebo". Neither "blind test" group will know who is taking which medication/placebo.

The question then becomes.. Are YOU willing to take the chance of being placed in the "placebo" group..!!? After all.. if you continue to take your "X" medication you at least know you can keep things "under control", but if you end up taking the "placebo's" then things are going to get a whole bunch worse.

As I said at the beginning.. "Clinical trials have their place in life, but then again depending upon the situation and circumstances, they sometimes can do more harm than good."

Breeze 2 User
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
Yes, it depends. A good friend of mine was in clinical trials years ago for the drug Gleevec (for chronic myeloid leukemia). If I'm not mistaken, the trials were suspended because the drug performed so well. Without knowing whether she was on the drug or the placebo, I know that she was placed on Gleevec and prob'ly continues to take it to this day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Guys,

Just to clear a few things up for those in the UK.

The majority of trials here are not only double blind but rotational meaning that there is no placebo group, everybody gets the drug on some days and the placebo or control on others.

The other thing about these trials is they all pay for your time. An average 30 day clinical trial pays between £3,000 - £4,500.

For more information on getting on a study feel free to PM me.
 
G

·
That Doesn't Make Any Sense..!!

Trial Cash said in part..

The majority of trials here are not only double blind but rotational meaning that there is no placebo group, everybody gets the drug on some days and the placebo or control on others.
Boy.. that doesn't make any sense. No.. I don't mean you, but having it done that way.

If it's a 30 day trial and 15 days you get something.. and the other 15 you don't (as in every other day), then how is it determined what works?

That's like having two boxes filled with envelopes. Box (a) has money in it.. and box (b) doesn't. Half the people are told to pick from box (a) every day.. and the other half are told to go to (b).

Every other day you switch the contents of the boxes.. and what happens? At the end of the 30 days everyone ends up with the same amount of cash. So what does that prove?

Your test has accomplished absolutely nothing.

Breeze 2 User
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top