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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
My husband is in the process of being checked for diabetes.
I made him make an appt. with the doctor after noting strange symptoms, which incluced, frequent/urgent urination, thirst, weight loss without changing eating habits.
His brother was diagnosed with prostrate cancer last year so I thought he needed that checked. In the course of testing his keytones were +4.
This caused the doctor to ask for blood tests.
Those tests came back yesterday as follows:

A1C: 8.7
Estimated Average Gluclose: 203
Gluclose: 162

I'm in shock as nobody in his family has diabetes, I on the other hand, have many family members.
He will be 64 in a couple of months, is not over weight and active in refering sports.
I worry what to do in the meantime?
Should he be eating different, what should we be on the look out, if anything, before a formal dx is made?
And what should we expect from his family doctor?
Thank you for any input.
I'm really concerned.
 

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Hello,
My husband is in the process of being checked for diabetes.
I made him make an appt. with the doctor after noting strange symptoms, which incluced, frequent/urgent urination, thirst, weight loss without changing eating habits.
His brother was diagnosed with prostrate cancer last year so I thought he needed that checked. In the course of testing his keytones were +4.
This caused the doctor to ask for blood tests.
Those tests came back yesterday as follows:

A1C: 8.7
Estimated Average Gluclose: 203
Gluclose: 162

I'm in shock as nobody in his family has diabetes, I on the other hand, have many family members.
He will be 64 in a couple of months, is not over weight and active in refering sports.
I worry what to do in the meantime?
Should he be eating different, what should we be on the look out, if anything, before a formal dx is made?
And what should we expect from his family doctor?
Thank you for any input.
I'm really concerned.
His A1C is high and that is a glimpse of what his blood sugar has been for the last 3 months. While you wait, watch the amount of carbs that he eats. Bread, pasta, potatoes, sugar, milk are all carbs. Protein and cheese and full fat foods are all acceptable for diabetics. Glance through the diet section on the forum and there are alot of examples of what to eat. Protein will become your friend, it has no carbs. Be careful about foods that you buy at the store. I like the frozen omelets that are made by Jimmy Dean but they have 4 carbs each and that is do to the fact that cream cheese is added. Read food labels! Try to not worry, you can live a very normal lifestyle if you have diabetes. Your husband has a few things in his favor right off the bat, he is not overweight and is active.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
His A1C is high and that is a glimpse of what his blood sugar has been for the last 3 months. While you wait, watch the amount of carbs that he eats. Bread, pasta, potatoes, sugar, milk are all carbs. Protein and cheese and full fat foods are all acceptable for diabetics. Glance through the diet section on the forum and there are alot of examples of what to eat. Protein will become your friend, it has no carbs. Be careful about foods that you buy at the store. I like the frozen omelets that are made by Jimmy Dean but they have 4 carbs each and that is do to the fact that cream cheese is added. Read food labels! Try to not worry, you can live a very normal lifestyle if you have diabetes. Your husband has a few things in his favor right off the bat, he is not overweight and is active.
Thank you for the advice.
We'll be watching the carbs for sure.
What should be expect from the doctor in the near future? Should he be calling my husband for further tests? What kind of tests should he get to be sure he gets the correct dx?
Thanks.
 

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Thank you for the advice.
We'll be watching the carbs for sure.
What should be expect from the doctor in the near future? Should he be calling my husband for further tests? What kind of tests should he get to be sure he gets the correct dx?
Thanks.
Depending on how up to date your doctor is on diabetes, he may just make the diagnosis and maybe start your husband on metformin and ask him to watch his diet and get plently of exercise. He may suggest that your husband see an endocrinologist (a doctor who specializes in diabetes). Your doctor may not run any additional tests. Doctors rely on A1C and fasting blood glucose readings. Your doctor may want to have your husband take a glucose tolerance test. You might be like to visit Blood Sugar 101, this website is packed full of information everything diabetes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks again for the reply.

I thought metformin was for type 2 diabetes?
I'll visit the site you recommendeded.
It's my belief that a person's treatment for any disease is only as good as the doctor's ability/knowledge, the patient's cooperation and being pro-active in their care. My husband will not be the later and will totally depend on what ever skill level the doctor demonstrates.
 

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Thanks again for the reply.

I thought metformin was for type 2 diabetes?
I'll visit the site you recommendeded.
It's my belief that a person's treatment for any disease is only as good as the doctor's ability/knowledge, the patient's cooperation and being pro-active in their care. My husband will not be the later and will totally depend on what ever skill level the doctor demonstrates.
Yes, metformin is a T2 medication. Excuse me for assuming that your husband will be T2. There are some people who are diagnosed with T1 diabetes later on in life, but the vast majority will be T2. If you feel that your doctor isn't going to provide the care you want, see an endocrinologist. Your husband can also see a certified diabetes educator, they are excellent in providing help to newly diagnosed diabetics. You are 100% right in believing that a person's treatment for any disease is only as good as the doctor's ability/knowledge, that is why most people with diabetes see and endocrinologist. There are also classes for people with diabetes, check your local diabetes association and local hospital's for classes for diabetes self management. I actually learned so much from this forum. You can learn alot from other's and their experiences.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, metformin is a T2 medication. Excuse me for assuming that your husband will be T2. There are some people who are diagnosed with T1 diabetes later on in life, but the vast majority will be T2. If you feel that your doctor isn't going to provide the care you want, see an endocrinologist. Your husband can also see a certified diabetes educator, they are excellent in providing help to newly diagnosed diabetics. You are 100% right in believing that a person's treatment for any disease is only as good as the doctor's ability/knowledge, that is why most people with diabetes see and endocrinologist. There are also classes for people with diabetes, check your local diabetes association and local hospital's for classes for diabetes self management. I actually learned so much from this forum. You can learn alot from other's and their experiences.
Thanks again for taking the time to reply and the tips. I'm already happy I joined this site. :)

I plan on spending time to learn as much as I can about this disease and how it's best treated, this site seems a very good start.

I just want to make sure he gets the proper dx. I believe our insurance requires a referral to see a specialist, here's hoping the family doctor will do so.
I hope it's going to only require metformin, I know something about that having been diagnoised with insulin resistance several years ago.

What would you want to see on your loved one's recommended tests to determine a correct dx, if you don't mind me asking?
 

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Thanks again for taking the time to reply and the tips. I'm already happy I joined this site. :)

I plan on spending time to learn as much as I can about this disease and how it's best treated, this site seems a very good start.

I just want to make sure he gets the proper dx. I believe our insurance requires a referral to see a specialist, here's hoping the family doctor will do so.
I hope it's going to only require metformin, I know something about that having been diagnoised with insulin resistance several years ago.

What would you want to see on your loved one's recommended tests to determine a correct dx, if you don't mind me asking?
Since diabetes runs in my family, I was diagnosed with one fasting reading of 126. I would like to see 2 fasting readings and an A1C test. Diagnosis of Diabetes Here is a website that might give you more details on test for diabetes.
 

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Welcome! I'm glad you found us.

It seems to me that it's all a matter of luck whether you get a doctor who really understands or not. My sister follows her doctor's advice.. but in my opinion, his advice stinks - he is happy if her A1C is under 7 and has no problem with a reading near 200 two hours after a meal. I can't convice her that she can and should keep her numbers much lower than that. I hope that your husband's doctor is better than that. Unfortunately, many (most?)doctors get their info from the American Diabetes Association who apparently get their info from the sellers of grain and the pharmaceutical companies - at least it seems that way.

I got lucky and my doc is very good but he still doesn't have the time to discuss the fine details of blood sugar control. Most of what I have learned came from here and from Blood Sugar 101 - I get many recipes from Linda's Low Carb Recipes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Welcome! I'm glad you found us.

It seems to me that it's all a matter of luck whether you get a doctor who really understands or not. My sister follows her doctor's advice.. but in my opinion, his advice stinks - he is happy if her A1C is under 7 and has no problem with a reading near 200 two hours after a meal. I can't convice her that she can and should keep her numbers much lower than that. I hope that your husband's doctor is better than that. Unfortunately, many (most?)doctors get their info from the American Diabetes Association who apparently get their info from the sellers of grain and the pharmaceutical companies - at least it seems that way.

I got lucky and my doc is very good but he still doesn't have the time to discuss the fine details of blood sugar control. Most of what I have learned came from here and from Blood Sugar 101 - I get many recipes from Linda's Low Carb Recipes.
This is what I fear for my husband too. He will think whatever the doctor says is gospel.
The doctors don't ususally have or take the time to look further into the latest research, imo.
I dealt with that for hypothyroidism. Try telling an endo that synthroid isn't for everyone or to really know what's going on with the thyroid try testing for free T3 and T4....sigh.

Thanks so much for your input. Is Linda's Low Carb Recipes a seperate site?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Since diabetes runs in my family, I was diagnosed with one fasting reading of 126. I would like to see 2 fasting readings and an A1C test.
I'll be looking to see if the doctor tests as you've suggested.
The odd thing is, my father, his parents, 8 of his siblings had diabetes and not a soul in my husband family has ever been diagnoised...go figure.
 

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I use my doctor for prescriptions but have learned to control my diabetes through my own research. I find most of the medical profession, even specialists advise diabetics to keep their bgs way too high. My doctor never explained diabetes to me and what normal numbers were. I was dx'd with a fasting of 240 and he told me that was early stage. When I started to read and found out a normal fasting was 75-95, I was shocked and scared. My dietician also gave me a diet with way too many carbs in it to lower my bgs. She also told me all diabetics ended up on insulin. I was very healthy before dx. I ate healthy and exercised 2 hours most days and played a lot of tennis. I was not overweight. I was 56 at the time. Many assume type 2 diabetics are overweight and never exercise, that is not true. There are lots of us like your husband with no family history and average weight. For some unknown reason we become insulin resistant and just can't tolerate carbs even the healthy ones like fruit, whole grain bread and cereal. I was a vegetarian before dx and had to totally redo the way I ate. I now eat things like bacon and eggs, bunless cheese burgers and lots of veggies. It is not a bad diet and my numbers now are great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I use my doctor for prescriptions but have learned to control my diabetes through my own research. I find most of the medical profession, even specialists advise diabetics to keep their bgs way too high. My doctor never explained diabetes to me and what normal numbers were. I was dx'd with a fasting of 240 and he told me that was early stage. When I started to read and found out a normal fasting was 75-95, I was shocked and scared. My dietician also gave me a diet with way too many carbs in it to lower my bgs. She also told me all diabetics ended up on insulin. I was very healthy before dx. I ate healthy and exercised 2 hours most days and played a lot of tennis. I was not overweight. I was 56 at the time. Many assume type 2 diabetics are overweight and never exercise, that is not true. There are lots of us like your husband with no family history and average weight. For some unknown reason we become insulin resistant and just can't tolerate carbs even the healthy ones like fruit, whole grain bread and cereal. I was a vegetarian before dx and had to totally redo the way I ate. I now eat things like bacon and eggs, bunless cheese burgers and lots of veggies. It is not a bad diet and my numbers now are great.
Thank goodness you were/are proactive in your health care.

We're not sure what type of diabetes it is yet. He just got the blood test results in the mail on Friday.
Hope the doctor calls him Monday to set up another appt..

Thank you for responding. I'm very glad to hear you're able to keep your numbers under control.
 

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Sounds like he has Type 2. I didn't have any family history and I was pretty healthy, sometimes it just happens. His doctor will probably put him on an oral medication like Metformin at first. That will help him become more sensitive to the insulin his pancreas makes. Reducing carbs at meals will lower his bgs pretty fast. He can still eat great meals like steaks, veggies, bacon and eggs. Just cut out the flours, sugars and starchier veggies like corn , potatoes and peas. I can eat a small amount of beans but have to keep it below 1/2 cup. I have also cut out rice, pasta and normal bread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Sounds like he has Type 2. I didn't have any family history and I was pretty healthy, sometimes it just happens. His doctor will probably put him on an oral medication like Metformin at first. That will help him become more sensitive to the insulin his pancreas makes. Reducing carbs at meals will lower his bgs pretty fast. He can still eat great meals like steaks, veggies, bacon and eggs. Just cut out the flours, sugars and starchier veggies like corn , potatoes and peas. I can eat a small amount of beans but have to keep it below 1/2 cup. I have also cut out rice, pasta and normal bread.
What makes you think it's type 2, especially in light of his weight loss?
We've been married nearly 41 years, the other day he lost his wedding ring of that many years. It slipped off due to his weight loss.

Thank you for the tips on eating correctly and for responding.
 

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What makes you think it's type 2, especially in light of his weight loss?
We've been married nearly 41 years, the other day he lost his wedding ring of that many years. It slipped off due to his weight loss.

Thank you for the tips on eating correctly and for responding.
I am T2 and when I wasn't taking care of my diabetes, I lost 60 pounds in 6 months and ate more calories than I do now. My doctor said that I was losing calories in my urine. Once I got my diabetes under control the weight loss stopped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I am T2 and when I wasn't taking care of my diabetes, I lost 60 pounds in 6 months and ate more calories than I do now. My doctor said that I was losing calories in my urine. Once I got my diabetes under control the weight loss stopped.
I can see there is so much to learn.
Would that explain my husband's keytone level at +4 as per what you mentioned about losing calories in the urine?

Can you tell me how you were diagnoised as T2 vs. T1?
 

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Ketones are produced when your body burns fats not carbs. In a Type 1, who has very high bgs 500+, there is no insulin produced by their pancreas to keep bgs low. Your husbands bgs are high but not that high. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease when something attacks and destroys your pancreas so you produce 0 insulin. Even though many type 2's also have to inject insulin they are not type 1's. Usually type 1's are dx'd much younger although once in awhile someone is dx'd later in life. Many type 2's also lose weight before dx. It is a misconception that all type 2's are overweight. I weight 112 pounds and am very much a type 2 and do find on oral meds. Make sure you ask for a GAD antibody test and a C Peptide test. That will tell you if he is a type 1. If he is a type 1 he will need to inject 2 types of insulin daily. Fast acting at meals and slow acting at night and maybe morning.
 
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