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If by "ordinary flour" you mean wheat flour, yeah, it is that bad because it's all carbohydrates with little (or no) fiber in it. But almond flour is a pain because it does not absorb moisture the way wheat (or rice or oat or tapioca or whatever) flour does, so it tends not to stick to other ingredients. As you noted, it falls off, burns, and so on.

I bought a couple of bags of almond flour when the Aldi grocery chain introduced it. I saw a bunch of keto recipes that called for it and thought it would be a cheap way to try it out. I have yet to open either bag. I guess I've just gotten out of the habit of eating bread, desserts, pasta, batter (for frying food), etc. so I haven't gone to the trouble of adapting almond flour to such recipes.

If you're really interested, though, searching for sites that feature keto recipes likely will show you how to make batters, mug breads, and so on successfully using almond flour.
 

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Thanks. I eat a lot of chicken and can no longer use that wonderful Panko Japanese style breading so trying to find substitutes.

Even flour is not that great but better than nothing. Chicken is so boring it needs a lot of flavor help.

I'll try what you suggested. Thanks.
 

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It may also be that there is another food better suited for replacing panko. Lots of people use crushed pork rinds; they have almost the same texture as panko and don't taste like pork in the quantities being used. I've seen recipes that use ground psyllium husks to provide a coating with a little "tooth".

I have cliipped a bunch of low-carb/keto recipes from Web sites for chicken because we, too, eat a lot of it. Check out the Recipes forum here as well; and the poster/moderator VeeJay on this site also has a Pinterest board with keto recipes; the link is in the footer of all of her posts.
 

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Wheat has gluten in it, which is a "glue" that holds the dough together and traps the yeast/soda bubbles which is what makes bread rise. Without that glue, the bubbles continue up and out and the dough "falls".

In order to bake with nut flours, which contain no gluten, something else needs to be added to it to trap the bubbles - gums and eggs will do that job. One can experiment, but nut flours are expensive, so it's much better to look for recipes and follow them.

When I fix chicken I don't use a breading. However, when fried with plenty of fat, it does get crispy. My go-to chicken seasoning is Penzey's Northwoods seasoning blend. It is sooooo good. Nothing boring about it.

I do have many chicken recipes on my Pinterest board - one common one is bacon wrapped chicken which I've yet to try but does look good.
 

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I’ve used Almond meal instead of bread crumbs, for crumbing (for example) chicken tenders. It works, reasonably well, as long as you also use egg to bind it. I tried almond flour for some biscuits (cookies) once... disgusting. Threw them out.
 

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I recently discovered this most excellent way to mimic fried chicken. It is really good! The skin is super crispy, though of course one must eat it when it comes out of the oven because once cooled it loses the crispiness. It's moist, crisp, just yum.

https://thesaltymarshmallow.com/crispy-baked-chicken-thighs/
 

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I think it's not as bad as you think. You can also cook with plain flour, but only if you have consulted your doctor in advance about the dosage and composition. After all, flour also happens to be different and from different products. My doctor said that I could cook both ways, but I still passed some tests for this. I like flour, and for me, homemade buns are the most delicious in the world. I cook only with gloves on, and I advise you to do the same. However, not all gloves are suitable for cooking, and if anyone is not aware, you can read the article on medrux.com since I was shocked when I found out this information.
 

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i think it's not that bad as you think
Hi, Helen! Welcome to our site!

I'm missing what you're referring to -- are you saying that almond flour isn't as hard to work with? Have you figured out how to get it working more like grain flours? If so, your expertise certainly will come in handy here.

Could we invite you to tell us a little more about yourself and your diabetes in our New Member Forum? Always good to get to know new people.
 

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I'm missing what you're referring to -- are you saying that almond flour isn't as hard to work with? Have you figured out how to get it working more like grain flours? If so, your expertise certainly will come in handy here.
I'd like to see the response too.

I've heard the problem with wheat flour best described, I think by the authors of Wheatbelly. "It's not your granddad's wheat". Too many changes due to genetic modifications.
 

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It may also be that there is another food better suited for replacing panko. Lots of people use crushed pork rinds; they have almost the same texture as panko and don't taste like pork in the quantities being used. I've seen recipes that use ground psyllium husks to provide a coating with a little "tooth".

I have cliipped a bunch of low-carb/keto recipes from Web sites for chicken because we, too, eat a lot of it. Check out the Recipes forum here as well; and the poster/moderator VeeJay on this site also has a Pinterest board with keto recipes; the link is in the footer of all of her posts.
Pork rind shake n bake sounds amazing! What a great idea .... stealing this one!
 
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