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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There are many moms on Facebook who have DAD's (Diabetes Alert Dogs) for their T1 kids. From all reports I have read these well trained dogs do their thing amazingly well. Many adults have them too. Two of the adults at the T1 meeting on Sunday, Oct 16, had DAD's. The dogs were very well behaved.

There was an article in Diabetes Health about a DAD. Here is the link:

Life With Kolumbo, My Hypoglycemia Alert Dog - Diabetes Health
 

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I do love the stories about service dogs. They are usually evaluated & chosen in puppyhood & trained within an inch of their lives, and yet remain sweet loving pets too. Thanks, Richard!
 

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I read this after watching Oprah's Lifeclass. It was about the UNCONDITIONAL love of pets ( namely dogs) She offered insight into a program called Puppies in Prison. It has prisoners train puppies who will then become service dogs for soldiers or people who have served for their country. It has an incredible, profound impact on both the prisoners and the soldiers.
I am ssoo HAPPY that Diabetics now have this opportunity aswell. Thanks for bringing it up Richard.
 

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I can't remember why, or where, but I was linked to one a few days ago ... I ended up watching a few videos of people with their dogs and I was genuinely impressed!
 

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We have a training facility for these dogs about 45 miles from where I live. It is in Oxford, MS. I contacted them because I have hypo's at night while I'm asleep. My husband says I wake him up by my legs going up and down beating on the bed, anyway they told me they cost thousands of dollars, as much as a car and I simply can't afford that. They said they train them by letting them smell of something with your sweat on it, because you have a certain odor when you get low. It is amazing dogs can do this. Insurances should pay for this, but mine won't.
 

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We have a training facility for these dogs about 45 miles from where I live. It is in Oxford, MS. I contacted them because I have hypo's at night while I'm asleep. My husband says I wake him up by my legs going up and down beating on the bed, anyway they told me they cost thousands of dollars, as much as a car and I simply can't afford that. They said they train them by letting them smell of something with your sweat on it, because you have a certain odor when you get low. It is amazing dogs can do this. Insurances should pay for this, but mine won't.
Interesting thing about the sweat b/c that's one of the main ways I can tell when I'm going below 70. I start sweating profusely like I've doing some kind of major exercise. My hair even gets wet from all the sweat. I was wondering the other day how a woman can tell the difference between menopause hot flashes and going hypo. :)
 

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Interesting thing about the sweat b/c that's one of the main ways I can tell when I'm going below 70. I start sweating profusely like I've doing some kind of major exercise. My hair even gets wet from all the sweat. I was wondering the other day how a woman can tell the difference between menopause hot flashes and going hypo. :)
You Can't tell the difference between Menopause and LBG. I am continuously confused between the 2.!!! I often get it at work. My pockets are FULL of snacks. I wonder If low carbing will eliminate the need for all those Just In case snacks.
 

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I know what you mean, I can soak my side of the bed in a matter of minutes when I get low bg. I'm only 36 and I'm always saying I already know what menopause feels like. :)
 

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I was Dx with early menopause at 36, night sweats were the primary symptom. Dx for diabetes followed this year, I am now 41. Last time I saw my doctor I asked whether the menopause dx might have been the diabetes but went into a flush as I asked him, which ruined that argument, LOL.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
DADs

This is funny! How did we go from Diabetes Alert Dogs to sweating and Menopause?? :p
 

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This is funny! How did we go from Diabetes Alert Dogs to sweating and Menopause?? :p
I noticed the same thing, Richard! LOL! Just as though we were sitting together in the living room chatting about everything - conversations ebb and flow in many directions!
We took a left turn in talking about the dog being trained to smell sweaty articles of clothing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I see. So, we have a "......dog being trained to smell sweaty articles of clothing"??? Sounds like a dog's life to me. I found a Group devoted to diabetes alert dogs today. It is amazing what you can read about these dogs there.
 

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I have a DAD myself and I absolutely love him! It's amazing what we can train dogs to do these days. Even tho I have issues with high instead of low blood sugars, I feel safer with him around and he is my antidepressant :)
 

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I see. So, we have a "......dog being trained to smell sweaty articles of clothing"??? Sounds like a dog's life to me. I found a Group devoted to diabetes alert dogs today. It is amazing what you can read about these dogs there.
Just FYI, we were talking about these dogs using sweat as a way of detecting a diabetic emergency and I made the point that it makes sense because sweating profusely is one of the symptoms of being hypo. See the connection?

And, yes, regular conversations do wax and wane depending on if people find the topic relevant to the personal experience and interest. :)
 
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