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I`m sitting here and wonder a little;
I have now 14 diseases in my body and lots of antibodies, but the only thing peole (and doctors) seems to think is a problem is the diabetes.
Actually I find the diabetes much easier to share life with than many other things I have to deal with.
How about you?
Do you find diabetes to be the end of the world, or have you found a way to live good with D?
 

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I don't like the idea of having it but since I join this group I have been a little happier knowing I am not alone and you are not alone this is the key phrase
 

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The only problem is there is a tunnel ahead which I don't know about, I am not sure whether whatever I am doing is to going to be enough or not.

But yes I have come to terms with it. It's not going to be the end of the world for me
 
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I am thankful for it every day. It has opened my eyes and forced me to learn so many things I didn't know before. My health is better than it has ever been. I know how to eat now in a way which preserves my health and is completely satisfying. I still take no medications of any kind. Life is good!
 

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It opened my eyes too, and all I hope for now, is that my loved ones will see the light before this hitchhiker finds them too. When I told my kids about my diagnosis, I told them 'this is your history now too, so keep an eye on it'. If they're as smart as I've always believed them to be, they'll heed old mom's words. :rolleyes:
 

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I don't like the idea of having diabetes and it has made my medical insurance outrageously expensive but it is definitely not the end of the world. I always considered myself pretty healthy until 5 years ago. I always was on some kind of diet but I also cheated alot. Now that I check my bgs I know which food spikes me so I tend to avoid it as much as possible. Watching my bgs has been the best thing that has happened to me. I am so much healthier now than before.
 
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Compared to the other illnesses I do have and could have, diabetes isn't so bad. At least I have more control over it than my other stuff...
 

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I look after very sick people... let's just say it gives me another perspective on life. Don't get me wrong; I don't like having diabetes. I hate this stupid disease. Since I can't get rid of it, I try to manage it as best as I can. I have good days. I have bad days. I figure I'd have good and bad days too, even without diabetes. I've learned a lot (and still learning!), and met a lot of interesting people during this journey. I agree, lots of unknown ahead of me. Would be the same without diabetes I gather. To be happy, if I wait for my life to be perfect... I'll never be happy.
 
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WHAT, I got D
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Well it nearly was the end of my world, DKA a couple of times, all the crapppy complications, heart surgery, etc.

But now after all that, I am doing fine. Still think about it often enough, but my life is good again. 5 grandkids, 3 boys, 2 girls. I am going to be around long enough to take them fishing and see them get married. We got a future genius in our mitts. 2.5 yrs old, already has a concept of time, directions, past, future, present, he's pretty scary and runs his mouth constantly.
 
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If I let myself get down because of any illness, disorder or disease that I might have, I visit the local Pediatric Oncology Ward of the hospital.

It puts things back into proper perspective for me.
 

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I ignored my diabetes for so long figuring it wouldn't cause problems until my Mom's death in 2005 from end stage renal failure due to diabetes. Even after that I still cheated alot and ate things I should not have been eating. My aha moment came last year when the cardiologist told me I would beat my Mom to the grave if I continued on the path I was on. I was only 47 yrs old; my Mom died at 66 y/o. That is when I decided I had to be serious and really follow a healthy lifestyle including diet, exercise and meds. That worked for a little while, but just like with the past experiences it slowly started getting worse again. That is when I found you guys and this forum. So literally, it did save my life. Eating LC/HF has given me a whole new outlook on my life, and eating, and being a diabetic. I know now that I cannot just ignore this disease and pretend it isn't there. I want to live to see my daughters finish college, get married, and have children of there own. I want to be there when they have questions about raising kids, and dealing with their husbands, and any other questions they will have. I know now that it is not just possible, but real. Thanks for all my diabetic buddies here, I have a brand new outlook on my life as a diabetic, and it is pretty bright.
 
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I am guilty of ignoring the fact that I have diabetes. But it has been a wake up call for me and has forced me to make some lifestyle changes that I needed to make even if I didn't have diabetes. Yes I wish I didn't have it, but I do and now I have to deal with it and make the best out of the situation. I guess you could say "It could always be worse"
 
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It has not opened my eyes.
My lifestyle was fine.

There were no "changes" necessary at all.

But I deal with it :)
Makes every day a littke more difficult which is what makes me a stronger person.
 

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I look after very sick people... let's just say it gives me another perspective on life.
^This.

If I let myself get down because of any illness, disorder or disease that I might have, I visit the local Pediatric Oncology Ward of the hospital.

It puts things back into proper perspective for me.
^And this.

By my age, my mother was quadriplegic from a benign tumor in her spine.

(How I hate that word, "benign."

be·nign [bih-nahyn]
adjective
1. having a kindly disposition; gracious: a benign king.
2. showing or expressive of gentleness or kindness: a benign smile.
3. favorable; propitious: a series of benign omens and configurations in the heavens.

As if a 6-inch tumor in your spine can ever be anything but catastrophic. But it didn't metastasize, so "benign" it is.)​
In spite of her paralysis, she returned to teaching, volunteering, singing in the church choir, and hosting her women's groups. Later on, she became dependent on a ventilator, but continued loving life, following sports, politics, world news, and her children's and grandchildren's lives.

That puts things in perspective for me. Compared to what Mama went through, my diabetes is a cakewalk -- or rather, a no-cake-for-me-walk. :p
 

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My diabetes was diagnosed less than a week after my 6'th birthday, in 1945. I don't remember what my life was like before that. It is just an everyday routine, and the only life I have known. Diabetes has not held me back, and I have accomplished every goal I had set for myself. Life has been great!! :)
 

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Diabetes is a very inconvenient disease. It isn't fun to deal with, but the more I learned about it, the greater the comfort level. It helps to have a Doctor who is a supporter and not a blocker; I have had both. Diabetes is a disease that must be self managed, a doctor can't manage it, even though many try (probably because they sense that their patient is not capable or willing). So it is not the end of the world for me......but

I remember a few years ago not long after I was diagnosed a type 1 that I attended a banquet where I sat close to a friend that I knew had for some years been dealing with type 2 diabetes. He had no feeling in his feet and so he kind of stomped around everywhere he went. It was pretty obvious he had neither the knowledge or the desire to manage his disease. After he finished his roast beef I saw him grab the piece of pie next to hs plate and begin to eat it at the same time exclaiming that he had gotten a good report from the doctor that day that his blood sugar was 120 and so he was going to have his dessert. How sad it is to see such ignorance that kills. Needless to say, the end of his world came soon after.
 

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Your T2 friend is probably much like the majority of diabetics in the US. Denial and a non-caring attitude gives way to poor health and a shortened life span.
 

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For me, the diagnosis of prediabetes came as a relief because I was SO TIRED for SO LONG and didn't know why. Now that I'm limiting carbs I don't get the bone-tired feeling anymore. I ran five different errands in a couple of hours and still had energy at the end! It's like I got my life back! And, it doesn't mean the absolute end of carbs, just restrictions, and hey, bacon. :D
 
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