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When I participated in the Joslin Medalist Study in December, 2009, I was told that the goal was to have examined 750 long term Type 1 diabetics. They have examined approximately 600 so far. The Study is to conclude in April, 2011.

All the participants have been Type 1 for 50 years, or more. You would think these Type 1's would have had good control to have lived so long and have no serious complications. That is not entirely true. The person in charge of my examination told me that several participants freely admitted they were very careless with their eating habits and rarely tested their BG, but they had no complications after 50+ years. Many of us, like me, knew so little about proper diabetes care during our first 30 years, but have used very good diabetes management in more recent years. My diabetes management was horrible until I found I was supposed to follow a low carb diet in 1988. Even then, I did not know about basal/bolus control with carb counting, but here I am after 64 years with no complications.

I think we Medalists are diabetic "freaks". We should not have lived so long and have such good health. I just hope that the Medalist Study will provide a treatment that can help recently diagnosed and younger Type 1's so they too can avoid complications. That is what Dr King, the man in charge of the Study, hopes will occur. Maybe we freaks have made a significant contribution by participating.
 

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I'm glad you posted about this - somehow I thought the study was over already. I hope you'll continue to keep us updated.

Now about these "freaks" . . . I'm going to consider you a very rare person, Richard. But freaky? Naaaaahhhh . . .
 

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Richard, you are by no means a freak! You are a great example of what can happen when you take charge of your diabetes. You may have gotten on the carb counting bandwagon late, but it certainly has not affected your health. Keep up the good work and setting an example to others who are struggling with diabetes T1 or T2. :first:
 

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I don't want to rain on your parade, Richard, but based on your own forum posts, you have hardly no complications. You regularly post about cataracts, erectile dysfunctions and such... I wouldn't call that complications-free.

Don't get me wrong, I respect you tremendously for sustaining a quality life with D for so long, but we should all be upfront about our medical conditions.
 

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Stoovie, when a diabetic posts about complications we mean diabetes-related complications. Those are retinopathy, neuropathy, amputations, kidney failure, and heart problems or stroke that have been diagnosed as caused by diabetes. I have none of those problems at this time, so as far as the usual diabetes-related complications are concerned, I am complication free.

I have had cataracts, carpal tunnel, gout and arthritis and all of those problems are more likely among diabetics, but I do not think mine are due to diabetes. I have several relatives with arthritis, carpal tunnel, cataracts and gout, but none of them are diabetics. I think my minor complications would have occurred even if I was not a diabetic.
 

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Freaks, Maybe not. Careful most likely as we want to be comfortable in our lives. So buy doing the right thing is why healthy people see us as freaks. ;)
 

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When I participated in the Joslin Medalist Study in December, 2009, I was told that the goal was to have examined 750 long term Type 1 diabetics. They have examined approximately 600 so far. The Study is to conclude in April, 2011.

All the participants have been Type 1 for 50 years, or more. You would think these Type 1's would have had good control to have lived so long and have no serious complications. That is not entirely true. The person in charge of my examination told me that several participants freely admitted they were very careless with their eating habits and rarely tested their BG, but they had no complications after 50+ years. Many of us, like me, knew so little about proper diabetes care during our first 30 years, but have used very good diabetes management in more recent years. My diabetes management was horrible until I found I was supposed to follow a low carb diet in 1988. Even then, I did not know about basal/bolus control with carb counting, but here I am after 64 years with no complications.

I think we Medalists are diabetic "freaks". We should not have lived so long and have such good health. I just hope that the Medalist Study will provide a treatment that can help recently diagnosed and younger Type 1's so they too can avoid complications. That is what Dr King, the man in charge of the Study, hopes will occur. Maybe we freaks have made a significant contribution by participating.
Richard, Medalists are not by any means freaks. Think about it, in the 40's most people cooked at home. Baked their own bread, ate vegetables from the local stand or grew them their selves,and people ate poultry from their own yards. Went fishing to make ends meet. Just as people did not have as much clothing. They walked everywhere.

Even in the 50's most food was freshly cooked at home, no preservatives, no fast food. Most meals were planned. Soups or beans and rice were on laundry day. Sundays family had the big meal as relatives usually visited, left overs were used to make other meals. Soups and salads were a staple because it stretched a meal. The evening meal was the big meal and usual eaten around 6 pm. The dessert was served later usually in the sitting room with company on a weekend night. People had vehicles, but most people still walked.

Fast foods and preservatives did not come into fashion until the mid 60's. And the fast food place were far and few apart. They were a place you did not go frequently and were like a treat. Most homes were happy to have refridgeration and really stocked them. buses and cars used on weekends instead of walking.

Even in the 70's most families ate at home, and fast food was mostly a weekend thing. The 80's was when fast food industry and pizza joint took off, also this is when diaseases and cancers started coming to the forefront. The intake of preservatives, sugars laden and sodium laden snacks with fat were being eating more often. People quit walking and started riding on buses and in cars to more places.

People did not eat as much junk food or sweet as they do now. Look at the average family of today, they will drive thru fast food for the family meal. Eat it while in front of the T.V. in a home with secuirty alarms. The children of today have never jumped rope, play hop scotch, hide and seek, it not, etc., their feet are soft and buns are round from not walking. The families and children don't know what a good home cooked meal is. Even for lunch the children are either bring lunchables or choosing from fast food served at school.

The younger generations are the ones with complications from diabetes and other diaseases, because of the life style and food they are eating. So Richard you are far from a freak, just a healthy diabetic.
 

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I used the word "freak" because it frequently refers to someone who is most unusual. I am unusual since I have now been a diabetic for 65 years and I do not have any diabetes complications. There are certainly others like me but we are in a small group. The members of that group are the ones I was calling "freaks". I am pleased I am that kind of freak.

I do agree with what you have said. My home cooked meals with everything grown on our farm, and animals we raised on the farm certainly contributed to my good health.
 
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