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Live Happy
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a question, I hear some people have died from diabetis or lose limbs, or vision. My question is, are these things caused by not taking meds not controllling your diabetes and not taking control to keep your diabetis under control?
 

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I have a question, I hear some people have died from diabetis or lose limbs, or vision. My question is, are these things caused by not taking meds not controllling your diabetes and not taking control to keep your diabetis under control?
If your doctor says you need medication, take it, don't argue.

Keep your blood sugar under control and it will take you a long way before you get any illnesses from diabetes. It is an individualized disease and affects every one different.
 

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Complications like blindness, amputations, heart attacks, kidney damage are caused by keeping bgs at a high level for a long time. This is why many of us are obsessive about testing. The closer to normal you can keep your bgs the less damage there will be to your blood vessels. If you can't achieve near bgs
(around 100) on your own, your doctor will prescribe meds. Sometimes the meds don't work and you need something else like insulin. You do what you have to do. The important thing is those low bgs.
 

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Live Happy
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you

Complications like blindness, amputations, heart attacks, kidney damage are caused by keeping bgs at a high level for a long time. This is why many of us are obsessive about testing. The closer to normal you can keep your bgs the less damage there will be to your blood vessels. If you can't achieve near bgs
(around 100) on your own, your doctor will prescribe meds. Sometimes the meds don't work and you need something else like insulin. You do what you have to do. The important thing is those low bgs.
Both my parents have it and they are both in there 70s they pretty much eat whatever they want. I have 2 sisters and they both do not have it. I am 44 and got it when I was 42 so far my levels stay pretty low sometimes i get a elevated level like 127 but most of the time its anywhere from 92 to 115. Does this mean I will in time get to the point where its just destroys me? I am just wondering because I try to do what I have to do to keep this under control.
 

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Both my parents have it and they are both in there 70s they pretty much eat whatever they want. I have 2 sisters and they both do not have it. I am 44 and got it when I was 42 so far my levels stay pretty low sometimes i get a elevated level like 127 but most of the time its anywhere from 92 to 115. Does this mean I will in time get to the point where its just destroys me? I am just wondering because I try to do what I have to do to keep this under control.
If you continue to maintain the levels you are now, you sharply reduce your risk of being "destroyed" any time soon, and I mean SHARPLY reduce! I'm sorry your parents aren't being more careful with their diets, and it would prob'ly be wise if your sisters, being higher risk too, would monitor their meals & their blood sugar. You seem to be setting a good example - I hope they're paying attention.
 

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Live Happy
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you continue to maintain the levels you are now, you sharply reduce your risk of being "destroyed" any time soon, and I mean SHARPLY reduce! I'm sorry your parents aren't being more careful with their diets, and it would prob'ly be wise if your sisters, being higher risk too, would monitor their meals & their blood sugar. You seem to be setting a good example - I hope they're paying attention.
I forced my sister to let me take her level and it was 145 I told her she should get checked and she said it was because she was drinking the night before. I told her the level should still be low if she was normal. People are so scared to prick with the needle I on the other hand have been so used to it in the last 2 years its just normal to me. Today this morning my level was 130 I got scared lol and after I ate 2 hrs it was 104 I now check 2 times a day compared to once every 2 weeks.
 

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Live Happy
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Complications like blindness, amputations, heart attacks, kidney damage are caused by keeping bgs at a high level for a long time. This is why many of us are obsessive about testing. The closer to normal you can keep your bgs the less damage there will be to your blood vessels. If you can't achieve near bgs
(around 100) on your own, your doctor will prescribe meds. Sometimes the meds don't work and you need something else like insulin. You do what you have to do. The important thing is those low bgs.
what would you say are high levels?
 

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Staying under 140 at all times is easy to remember. Running an average of 100 is even easier to remember. Good for you getting scared at that 130 fasting - I was 122 today & I don't like that either! :mad: Gotta stay low - the lower the better. 70s, 80s, 90s are good.
 
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I forced my sister to let me take her level and it was 145 I told her she should get checked and she said it was because she was drinking the night before. I told her the level should still be low if she was normal. People are so scared to prick with the needle I on the other hand have been so used to it in the last 2 years its just normal to me. Today this morning my level was 130 I got scared lol and after I ate 2 hrs it was 104 I now check 2 times a day compared to once every 2 weeks.
yeah most people shy away from the finger prick. My family and friends have been game enough sometimes to check their BGLs with my glucometer. For some weird reason, it's the ladies in my family that have diabetes, not the men (well 3 of us I know of). It's probably a good idea to test your BGLs more regularly throughout the day too. I check probably 6 times on average... sometimes a lot more if I'm having problems. But I'm on insulin... but if you're on any meds, testing more regularly is a must. Everyone is so different... so how this disease impacts is going to be different for everyone. All we can do is stay positive and do the best we know how. :D
 

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Live Happy
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Testing

yeah most people shy away from the finger prick. My family and friends have been game enough sometimes to check their BGLs with my glucometer. For some weird reason, it's the ladies in my family that have diabetes, not the men (well 3 of us I know of). It's probably a good idea to test your BGLs more regularly throughout the day too. I check probably 6 times on average... sometimes a lot more if I'm having problems. But I'm on insulin... but if you're on any meds, testing more regularly is a must. Everyone is so different... so how this disease impacts is going to be different for everyone. All we can do is stay positive and do the best we know how. :D
My doctor told me I did not have to test everyday because my levels are pretty normal I stay at about 112 in the morn and it stays just under 120 I wish it would go lower I have not seen a low 90s level in a while now today this morning it was 125 that still scares me a bit I eat a very small bowl of oatmeal every morning people say that is good for you but you get different stories from everyone so as long as the levels stay low I guess for now I am ok.
 

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Live Happy
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Staying under 140 at all times is easy to remember. Running an average of 100 is even easier to remember. Good for you getting scared at that 130 fasting - I was 122 today & I don't like that either! :mad: Gotta stay low - the lower the better. 70s, 80s, 90s are good.
So if your levels run about 105 to 120 is that good?
 
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My doctor told me I did not have to test everyday because my levels are pretty normal I stay at about 112 in the morn and it stays just under 120 I wish it would go lower I have not seen a low 90s level in a while now today this morning it was 125 that still scares me a bit I eat a very small bowl of oatmeal every morning people say that is good for you but you get different stories from everyone so as long as the levels stay low I guess for now I am ok.
yeah when I was first diagnosed in 1998 with type 2 my docs said the same thing... don't worry about testing too often. But in reality that is not good advice to avoid complications. I also eat porridge (I'm not sure if there's any difference between oatmeal & porridge?) regularly and it's Ok for me and helps actually keep my BGLs stable in the morning. But your glucometer is your tool to figure out what works well for you... especially if you're noticing you have BGLs getting a bit more elevated that usual. If you can do it, test more regularly than what your doc has advised. I can tell you that if you wind up on insulin (like myself) you have to do it regardless as docs want to look at your BGL records. Here the docs usually ask for your records when you're put on meds anyhow (not just insulin). But rather than just do it for your doc, do it for you... you're already saying you're concerned about complications... it's the only way to see what's actually happening with your condition.
 

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Live Happy
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
yeah when I was first diagnosed in 1998 with type 2 my docs said the same thing... don't worry about testing too often. But in reality that is not good advice to avoid complications. I also eat porridge (I'm not sure if there's any difference between oatmeal & porridge?) regularly and it's Ok for me and helps actually keep my BGLs stable in the morning. But your glucometer is your tool to figure out what works well for you... especially if you're noticing you have BGLs getting a bit more elevated that usual. If you can do it, test more regularly than what your doc has advised. I can tell you that if you wind up on insulin (like myself) you have to do it regardless as docs want to look at your BGL records. Here the docs usually ask for your records when you're put on meds anyhow (not just insulin). But rather than just do it for your doc, do it for you... you're already saying you're concerned about complications... it's the only way to see what's actually happening with your condition.
You know what? thats just what I was thinking, Because I want to keep it low and I hope my body does not get resistant to the meds so far its low levels but you never know in 5 years, here is what I usually do.
In the morning I get up I check my level then take my meds and eat breakfast. I then eat a small meal at about 12 or so, I then take another diabetic med about 5pm about 7pm to 8pm I then check my level again. I work out after I get off work about 12am then I come home have a big glass of water and take my last med that is the chelestorol med. thats my system and I have done this for 2 years now, Oh and I do drink lots of water I love water. what do you think? All I know is I love talking about it some people say I talk to much about it but thats what keeps me going and sane. :boom:
 

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All I know is I love talking about it some people say I talk to much about it but thats what keeps me going and sane.
Never fear - you're among friends here! ;) Many of us find we can share things on this forum that we don't discuss with people near to us because they have little-or-no understanding of the problems & triumphs. It's incredible the strength we derive from being heard & understood by our fellow travelers!

p.s. It was one of my favorite things too, OM2W, but I DO think your oatmeal could be sabotaging your BGs . . . you could go without for a few days & see if your numbers improve. Oats are another of those cereal grains like wheat & rice which can really smack our numbers around.
 
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Oh and I do drink lots of water I love water. what do you think? All I know is I love talking about it some people say I talk to much about it but thats what keeps me going and sane. :boom:
I love water! That's my main drink everyday. I drink 2 coffees and a small amount of fruit juice in the mornings and then it's water for the rest of the time. I find chilled water actually does help lower your BGLs too.
It's good to hear you're testing at least twice per day. Although what I was referring to earlier is to try testing a bit more often throughout the day if you can. To find out what food does to you... check your BGL before you eat, then 1 hour after you eat to see how far you spike, then 2 hours or more after you eat. I have found that sometimes my BGL doesn't spike fully until 3 hours after eating. But you won't know any of this if you don't test. Even if it's just a short period to figure out what your oatmeal does to you for example. You're basically trying to keep your BGLs level all day, not just in the morning with the FBG and in the evening after your meal. I know this sounds like a lot to do, but most of us here would agree that unless you test you don't know or understand your condition fully. We are all so different and one size doesn't fit all really. Eg. I can handle oats, others here can't. Knowledge is power as they say. Of course if you're able to do this, I would recommend it. :)
 

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Live Happy
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Never fear - you're among friends here! ;) Many of us find we can share things on this forum that we don't discuss with people near to us because they have little-or-no understanding of the problems & triumphs. It's incredible the strength we derive from being heard & understood by our fellow travelers!

p.s. It was one of my favorite things too, OM2W, but I DO think your oatmeal could be sabotaging your BGs . . . you could go without for a few days & see if your numbers improve. Oats are another of those cereal grains like wheat & rice which can really smack our numbers around.
so oatmeal is not good? my god what do I eat then>?
 

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Live Happy
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I love water! That's my main drink everyday. I drink 2 coffees and a small amount of fruit juice in the mornings and then it's water for the rest of the time. I find chilled water actually does help lower your BGLs too.
It's good to hear you're testing at least twice per day. Although what I was referring to earlier is to try testing a bit more often throughout the day if you can. To find out what food does to you... check your BGL before you eat, then 1 hour after you eat to see how far you spike, then 2 hours or more after you eat. I have found that sometimes my BGL doesn't spike fully until 3 hours after eating. But you won't know any of this if you don't test. Even if it's just a short period to figure out what your oatmeal does to you for example. You're basically trying to keep your BGLs level all day, not just in the morning with the FBG and in the evening after your meal. I know this sounds like a lot to do, but most of us here would agree that unless you test you don't know or understand your condition fully. We are all so different and one size doesn't fit all really. Eg. I can handle oats, others here can't. Knowledge is power as they say. Of course if you're able to do this, I would recommend it. :)
why did you become a type 1 if you was following your diet and eating right?
 

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Live Happy
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Just tested myself again before eating and my level is 79 I felt a bit dizzy I was playing xbox and felt a bit dizzy I think im over reacting but my level was 79 I also got a false reading of 49 and my meter said your level is low I tested right after and it said 79 not even a min later I have like 10 meters so ill check a different one. just checked again and this time it says 91 with a different meter. uhh! Now remember I did stop taking the meds for a few days and now im back on it so it used to do this when I first started.
 
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why did you become a type 1 if you was following your diet and eating right?
I'm actually type 2 on full time insulin. The reason is that some of the beta cells in my pancreas are damaged so that my pancreas still produces some insulin, but not enough for my needs. I've had type 2 since 1998. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease which is a bit different to type 2 because there's antibodies involved. I started out on diet and exercise back then and was fine to start with. I then needed oral meds. The oral meds stopped working on me... obviously because my pancreas wasn't producing enough insulin in the first instance. This is possibly due to oral meds working my pancreas hard too. I was on metformin to begin with for 5+ years... it didn't agree with me at all and only worked for a couple of years on me. I was placed on insulin in Feb10. Some people can keep diabetes in 'remission' so to speak... but it's always there. I wasn't able to do that. Docs always tell you it's progressive. I didn't believe them either... but now when I look back I can see what they were saying. Like everyone I've tried my best. I've had my tough times.... and I've had a tonne of illnesses to contend with in the past 4 years.
 
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