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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Doctors are hoping to revolutionise how children with type 1 diabetes receive their regular insulin doses using a special sensor inserted under the skin and transmitting data to a mobile phone.

Early trials of the device are being carried out at the Princess Margaret Hospital in Perth amid hopes it will simplify how diabetics receive their crucial insulin doses.

People with type 1 diabetes currently have to measure their blood sugar levels up to 10 times a day by carrying out finger prick tests.

Based on those results, they calculate how much insulin they need to either inject from a small pump strapped to their body or using a syringe.

However the new device relies on an electronic sensor, injected under the skin, to take constant blood sugar readings, thus removing the need for finger prick tests.

It sends those readings to a specially programmed mobile phone which calculates how much insulin the child needs and tells the pump how much to release into the bloodstream.

Thirteen-year-old Perth schoolboy William Goyder was the first child in the world to take part in the trial and so far he and his parents are impressed.

Instead of having to get up twice a night to check William's blood sugar levels to make sure he was not in danger of slipping into a coma, everyone in the house slept while the device ensured his glucose levels remained stable.

"We trialled it over two nights and it kept his blood sugar levels stable," William's father and Wesfarmers managing director Richard Goyder told AAP.

"This is quite groundbreaking technology.

"William was obviously very excited about it because it could make a big difference."

Head of the hospital's diabetes department Tim Jones said the device had been developed as part of a wider international project to invent an artificial pancreas to act as a technological solution to insulin replacement.

"So far the device has worked beautifully," Professor Jones said.

"It will lift the burden of managing diabetes significantly if we can get it to work.

"The idea is to take the person out of the loop because people are unreliable and put a machine there instead."

Doctors at the hospital will continue the trial by seeing if the device works over two nights and under different conditions, including while a diabetic child is exercising.

Belinda Tasker, AAP National Medical Correspondent

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/health/8270724/high-tech-boost-for-diabetics

Oh to be 2 years old again with the technology of to day:D
 

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HW? Do you have a link for where you got this article? Would you mind adding it to your post, just in case any copyright experts happen by to read our boards? ;)

And now that I've read it, this sounds incredible!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
HW? Do you have a link for where you got this article? Would you mind adding it to your post, just in case any copyright experts happen by to read our boards? ;)

And now that I've read it, this sounds incredible!
Sorry was in hurry and link would not paste:confused: My Siberian husky died last sunday and was talking to vet getting toxicology reports hurried up. Not sure if it was rat bait or snake bite but he went pretty quick so bet is a brown snake as they have been active here since floods even though it is winter here:eek:
 

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I don't know much about any of this, but doesn't a pump sense blood sugar and adjust insulin does accordingly? If they're just getting to that now, I don't find that terribly amazing. I thought they could do that long ago. In any case, after experiencing cell phones all these years, no so sure how excited I'd be entrusting my life to one.
 

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Sorry was in hurry and link would not paste:confused: My Siberian husky died last sunday and was talking to vet getting toxicology reports hurried up. Not sure if it was rat bait or snake bite but he went pretty quick so bet is a brown snake as they have been active here since floods even though it is winter here:eek:
I am SO sorry! It's hard enough when we lose our furballs to old age, but this is the most painful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't know much about any of this, but doesn't a pump sense blood sugar and adjust insulin does accordingly? If they're just getting to that now, I don't find that terribly amazing. I thought they could do that long ago. In any case, after experiencing cell phones all these years, no so sure how excited I'd be entrusting my life to one.
Hi smorgan, Insulin pumps even with CGM sensors need to be manually adjusted and some will turn off basal dose for a couple of hours if BGL is low

What they are hoping to achieve with this trial is to have a pump which replicates the pancreas and automatically adjusts insulin dosage to BGL's thus giving us more control of levels constantly which is not achievable with current pumps Not to sure about the mobile phone calculating my insulin needs:D

I am still registered with Diabetic Educators Association here so will see what I can dig up in regards to this trial;)
 

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HW - sorry to hear about your Husky, I know I' be beside myself if something happened to my Black Lab.

The article really is good news and is forward thinking towards one day having the artificial Pancreas function for us.
I'd bet they use the cell (smart phone) and in addition to local control use it to send data to doc or researchers. The bluetooth part of the newer phones can be used for many applications. My FIL had a very slow & irregular heartbeat, his doc used a device to monitor and then bluetooth connected to a smart phone & send data to his office. After a week the doc knew exactly how to set the pacemaker. Technology can be quite interesting!
Thank you for posting!!!
 
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