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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
I had the courage to get a blood test (my last blood test was 14 years ago, im 34 years old). I'm terrified of needles and it was a traumatic experience for me getting blood out. That was the positive news. Unfortunately the bad news is that I have been diagnosed with prediabetes within the last few hours.

As I am unable to see my doctor due to COVID restrictions in my country, I came across this group in search of support groups and places I can learn more about this condition.

I quit drinking alcohol 5 months ago however I still smoke. I have been slightly overweight for 2 years but have packed on 4kg since being in COVID lockdown (gyms for instance are closed). I had been fairly active but I must admit, I have been eating a lot of junk food. Chocolate is my weakness.

I respectfully wanted to ask the following questions as I am extremely nervous with what lies ahead. If I have offended anyone, I genuinely apologise and do not intend to offend anyone.

Questions:
1/ Is it possible to get my sugar levels back to a normal level for good if I make some changes to my lifestyle? Or has the damage already been done?

2/ With a diagnosis of prediabetes, even if I get my sugar levels back to a normal level, does this mean that I can never eat chocolate again? If I were to eat a whole block (that is 180g) if I get back to a normal level, would I then go straight back into the prediabetes level?

3/ Thinking about the long-term and if my condition does not improve and I get Type 2 Diabetes: If the answer is YES for question 1, is it also possible for someone with Type 2 Diabetes to get their sugar levels to a normal level too just as a diabetic can? If not, why not? Surely if you make changes to your lifestyle with Type 2 diabetes, you will also be able to get your sugar levels to a normal level and totally get rid of Diabetes? Or am I missing something here?

4/ If a person manages to reverse prediabetes, is it possible that they can live the rest of their life without developing Type 2 Diabetes? Or will it still inevitably cause Type 2 Diabetes?

5/ I'm still coming to terms with my diagnosis. From my understanding, basically you can have no problems with blood sugars levels or if you do, you have the condition Type 2 Diabetes, right? In terms of prediabetes, do I or don't I have diabetes yet? Is there something wrong with my pancreas as a prediabetic or is my pancreas more like someone with no diabetes OR someone with diabetes? Is it correct in saying that prediabetes just a term used to say that our pancreas arent screwed yet AND to give us a warning that if we dont change our ways we will develop problems such as Diabetes?

Sorry for the long questions. I really appreciate people going out of their time to answer these questions. I hope you are all safe and doing well.
 

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dyara115, yes; no; yes -- sort of; no (see previous answer); it's complicated. I'll explain further. :)

First, welcome to the site! I'm glad you found us. We're not medical doctors so we can't give medical advice, but many of us here have devoted a lot of time to reading case studies and research about diabetes so we understand the mechanisms and more about what works well and what does not. Feel free to look around; there's a lot of information and support here.

To your questions. I'll try to keep this short(er).

First, the scarier stuff. Many people contend there is no such thing as "prediabetes" -- you either have diabetes or you don't. Diabetes, as you are learning, is a chronic condition. There is no cure (short of a pancreas transplant and maybe not even then [see below]). If diabetes is not managed, it will get worse, and, as with any other condition, sometimes the management has side effects of its own. You can find ways to bring your blood sugar levels back to non-diabetic levels, but if you were to stop using them, your diabetes would go back to where it was or worse and the side effects would resume.

The good news is that you're at a stage when making some changes will help tremendously. Yes, you can bring your blood sugar levels down to the levels of people without diabetes. That will spare you the worst of the condition: the neuropathy, the vision problems, the increased risks of cardiac disease or even contracting severe COVID-19. It can be as easy as changing what you eat and how much you exercise.

Chocolate can be part of a diabetic eating plan. Dark chocolate is better for you than milk chocolate with sweet things embedded in it. 180g is a lot of chocolate in one sitting, though. You may have to cut back but you can still eat chocolate.

Many of us here have managed our diabetes for years by eating very few carbohydrates. Carbs are necessary for some bodily functions but not in the quantities people in more developed countries typically eat them. Your body can learn how to create the glucose it needs with just a few grams of carbs a day. There also are people who eat only during a few hours of the day; research has shown this has a good effect on blood sugar, too. In fact, if you could manage one meal a day, you probably could make all your carbs a good amount of dark chocolate. :)

I'll recommend that your one of your first stops on this site be this starter's page: https://www.diabetesforum.com/threads/diabetes-resources-to-help-you-get-started . It will point you to resources regarding low-carb eating plans. Take a look and then please post again with questions you may have. You can do this -- many of us have and are managing our diabetes to the point where it's not a looming factor in our lives.
 

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Steve is correct. Pre diabetes simply means that your body is experiencing insulin resistance.. It's good to catch it now before it becomes full blown diabetes. If you change your eating habits now now you may very well never progress to having full blown type 2 diabetes and need to have medication for it. I was not so lucky and was diagnosed when I had full blown diabetes. I had been to a couple of different endocrinologists and was prescribed more and more meds over the 8 years since my diagnosis, and finally was faced with having to start insulin when I decided To make some huge changes. Carbs are the devil to people with insulin resistance. I eliminated carbs almost all together, and completely eliminated sugar, starches. pasta's, grains, all Processed foods. The good news is that I can still eat meats, healthy fats, cheese, leafy green veggies and can honestly say im never hungry. I do have the occasional dark chocolate or Sugar free dessert. But I have to honestly say I don't really miss it. My blood sugars are now within normal range 100% of the time and I'm off all of my meds. I've lost 90 pounds and normalized my cholesterol blood pressure and eliminated my and eliminated my IBS and diverticulitis . I've never felt healthier in my life.
 

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Thanks, 1r1shayes, and welcome!

Waving goodbye to carbohydrates is not easy, especially with (carby) food being such a central element in American life. But going without diabetes meds or insulin injections? Never having to worry about a hypoglycemic episode? Missing out on a lot of the long-term problems with diabetes, like the neuropathy and the vision problems? There is a great payoff to making the switch.

1r1shayes, would you be good enough to introduce yourself in our New Members forum?
 

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I had an A1C of 8.3 when I was diagnosed with diabetes, and I brought it down very quickly to 5.2, with no medications. Only a low carb diet. It helped that my wife came on board right from the start, and she has learned a lot of good low car recipes. In simple terms, stay away from Potatoes, Bread, Rice, Sugar and Pasta, and you'll be well on your way to success. Also, do a you tube search for Dr Sarah Hallberg, and Dr Andreas Eenfeldt. They have a lot of good videos on the subject.
 

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Welcome!
It's good that you found this group because they know what they're talking about and they have helped me tremendously.
At your stage you shouldn't be worried. Your case is easy to fix. Easier said than done!
Eat low carb. In a perfect world I would have my blood glucose numbers down but like you I love the sweets!
Eating low carb well get your numbers down the fastest.
The occasional sweet is not good for you but it's very hard to turn away from them. You're only asked to do the best you can.
 

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Welcome!
It's good that you are taking your health seriously. Years ago a doctor told me that my blood sugar was a little high, but nothing to worry about. He didn't call it pre-diabetes, but I might have taken it more seriously.
You've come to a good place for knowledge and support. I wish I had been as smart as you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks to each one of you who replied, and for the warm welcome.

It seems (based on my research and please pull me up if I am wrong) that unfortunately for some, genetics is a too strong of a force for some and will really result in Type 2 Diabetes regardless of how much they exercise or what they do. For the rest, whether a T2 Diabetic, prediabetic or someone with normal sugar levels, diet and exercise are extremely important in helping to prevent T2 Diabetes.

If someone had T2 Diabetes and they were able to get their sugar levels to a normal level by exercising and eating healthy whilst maintaining a healthy body weight range. On the other side of the coin, a completely normal person who generally eats healthy, exercises and is within the healthy body weight range. If both of these people went on a holiday and had no choice but to eat a McDonalds Big Mac Meal, would the former Diabetic get a bigger sugar rise than the healthy person? In other words, would that meal alone put them back into the Diabetic range or would they need to go back to their previously unhealthy lifestyle for the T2 Diabetes to creep back up? I don't plan to return to my old ways, but just want to understand this condition better and secondly, be realistic - If I am away on a holiday and have no choice other than to eat something unhealthy or starve, I may need to eat unhealthy for a day or two before returning to eating healthy and exercising again. What long-term impact would this have on my blood sugar levels?


Many people contend there is no such thing as "prediabetes" -- you either have diabetes or you don't.
Thanks itissteve. So could you please tell me whether you think I have diabetes or not? These were my results:

Glucose Fasting: 5.8 mmol/L (3.6 – 6). On the test, it says 3.6 – 6 is NORMAL.

Insulin Fasting (Abbott Architect Method): 8 mU/L (0-20). Apparently this is NORMAL too.

HbA1C (IFCC): 40 mmol / mol ( 20-38)
HbA1C (NGSP): 5.8% (4.0-5.6)
Here it seems as though I am SLIGHTLY ABOVE NORMAL. Is 5.8mmol/L a terrible score to have?

It seems as though in my country a HbA1C score of 5.8% is indicative that I have pre-diabetes. However, I was looking on the internet and it seems that a British scientific organisation claims that 4.0-5.9 is normal and not indicative of prediabetes. Regardless, my score is very close to this and it is concerning nevertheless. Here is the link to this article:

In the article, it also shows that for Diabetics a good score is 6.5-7.5. Can I respectfully ask why isn't it lower than 6.5? Or is this the score that they recommend for Type 1 Diabetics.

Thank you for allowing me to learn more about this condition. God bless and I hope you are all doing well.
 

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dyara, some of the questions you have are semantic. Others have more complex "it-depends" answers. I'll try to keep this brief but complete :):

Diabetes is a metabolic issue of blood glucose regulation. Humans eat carbohydrates that the body digests/transforms into glucose for cellular use. Insulin, produced by the pancreas, regulates the level of glucose in the blood. If the body does not produce enough (or any) insulin or if the body produces insulin but does not shut off the supply to meet the amount of carbohydrates ingested, an imbalance occurs. Too much glucose causes physical cell damage; too little glucose (brought on by an insulin response) and you get the signal to eat and refuel your body or your body starts shutting down (coma or death).

Because science depends on measurement, diabetes is defined using the test measurements you've seen. But those definitions are arbitrary. Instead of an A1c of 6.0, diabetes could be defined as an A1c of 5.75. Or 5.5. Or three abnormally-high A1cs. It's a construct, an agreement made by medical professionals to establish a common vocabulary.

If you don't meet whatever the definition is, then (by definition) you don't have diabetes. However, your body still displays the issues managing glucose and insulin which, if ignored, quite likely would lead to you meeting the definition of diabetes, so some people call what you have now "pre-diabetes". And that's why some of us believe there is no such thing as pre-diabetes. You either have the metabolic issue or you don't. There isn't really a point in pre-diabetes when you can do something that will forever bring glucose regulation back to normal. And there does appear to be a genetic component to it that we don't yet fully understand.

(Fasting) glucose tests are a snapshot of your blood chemistry at the time you took the test. Like all snapshots, they may not show something that is happening pretty frequently but wasn't in view at the time the camera shutter was open. That's where A1c comes in. It measures blood glucose levels indirectly but covers a period of about three months. So, just as taking a time lapse of photos would show more of what was going on over time, an A1c shows more of how well your body is regulating blood glucose over time.

Your fasting test result of 5.8 fell within normal ranges. But if we had taken more snapshots over the past three months or so those tests would have shown abnormally-high glucose levels many more times than not -- the A1c results above the thresholds you listed. I (not a doctor and not playing one on TV) would call that diabetes since the metabolic issue exists.

5.8 is not a terrible score. People have introduced themselves on this site when they had A1cs above 10. Most of us here (me included) are happy to have an A1c under 6 with just diet and exercise. To be honest, I'm not sure I've ever seen anyone with diabetes (on-line or otherwise) who got their A1c down below 5.0 on any consistent basis. Not saying they don't exist but I think they're rare.

One reason why some medical providers consider 6.5-7.5 a good range for A1c for some diabetics is because the regulation of blood glucose by insulin is reactive. Providing too much insulin in reaction to a given glucose level is unhealthful. It's a chemical reaction and sometimes they go awry -- the hypoglycemic "crash" you may have heard about. So some medical providers like to see a higher A1c so that imbalances can be addressed with a wider margin of error (that is, more time to react to the crashing glucose levels and so guessing wrong on the amount of insulin provided has less of a chance to take the body to the super-low-glucose danger zone). This somewhat ignores the long-term negative effects of high blood glucose while addressing the real and quick possibility of hypoglycemia.

As for foods, both the diabetic and the non-diabetic eating the Big Mac meal would see the same increase in blood glucose levels. The difference would be that the non-diabetic's body would provide enough insulin, tailored to the need, to keep blood glucose at its normal levels. The diabetic's body would react less precisely, either needing time to provide the needed insulin or maybe even needing insulin injected to counteract the high levels.

However, you do have a choice. Don't eat the buns. Have a few fries. Or order just the sandwich (sans buns) and a side salad. (I will mention from personal experience that the kiosks at McDonald's makes it much easier to customize orders like this.)

I will admit that sometimes it's difficult. Many people find sweets hard to pass up. American food, in particular, seems excessively carbohydrate laden to me (for example, a burger with breaded onion rings on it, ketchup and fries on the side, and a sugary drink). I've eaten a lot of chef salads and chicken wings in restaurants because they are reliable (or at least more trustworthy) sources of low-carb food (we'll get into the sandbagging parts of that in another post).

One nice thing about going low-carb in food is that your body learns to generate the glucose it needs from fat and that, without those peaks and valleys of blood glucose, it's easier to miss a snack or a meal until you can eat something good for you. So there should be fewer instances of having to eat someplace where nothing is appropriate for you.

But, if there isn't, or if it's your birthday and you really miss birthday cake and you want a piece of birthday cake once a year dammit, eat it. Be as considerate of the carb levels as you can but scratch the itch. Diabetes will need to be managed throughout our lifetimes. Sometimes you just have to take a little break. Don't go too far overboard and you'll be fine. Over the years it will be a small peak on what we hope is a flat, healthful landscape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Because science depends on measurement, diabetes is defined using the test measurements you've seen. But those definitions are arbitrary. Instead of an A1c of 6.0, diabetes could be defined as an A1c of 5.75. Or 5.5. Or three abnormally-high A1cs. It's a construct, an agreement made by medical professionals to establish a common vocabulary.
Thanks - I suspected that this was the case and it was good to hear it from someone.

You either have the metabolic issue or you don't.
I would have to agree with this statement too. I wasn't surprised by my A1c results if I was honest - my fitness routine and diet were totally out of whack these last few months since being forced into lockdown due to coronavirus. In the month leading up to my blood test, that is 30 days, I ate McDonalds about 6 times, along with other junk food and a whole heap of chocolate. I knew something was wrong - I was urinating more frequently and thirsty all the time. Even though I walked for 45 minutes every day, it isn't the strenuous exercise I was used to. I really believe that my diet was a contributing factor to my A1c level of 5.8 and with that being an average, there must have been days where I was in the 6's, especially the days I binged on chocolate.

But one thing that I believe in, in my personal situation, is that I do not believe that I have strong genetics that have contributed to this - one of my uncles is the only relative with Diabetes who got it in his 50's (I would assume it is Type 2 as he has always regularly measured his blood). I am about 11kg (now 9.5kg after dieting and exercising during the last week) away from being within my healthy BMI. I believe if I lose the 9.5kg, continue to exercise moderate level activity for 45 minutes most days of the week and eat a relatively healthy diet, I will get into the normal A1c range.

And once I do, I will aim to maintain my body weight so that I am never overweight again. But at the same time, I will not go back to my full-on bad ways (like the ones described below) but I do want to try and reintroduce a little more sugar in my life (such as 1 sugar in my coffee instead of 2 and a nutella sandwich on brown bread everyday instead of 2 sandwiches). Do you think this would be bad for me? I mean, I previously used to drink 3 coffees a day with 2 sugars in each, I used to eat 2 nutella sandwiches on white bread, I used to eat 100g of chocolate a day a long with other rubbish food such as fried food every few days and only got an A1c level of 5.8. I am not proud of this A1c level at all so please don't assume that. I am just merely trying to argue the point that given how much junk I ate, surely one would have assumed my A1c level to be higher?????????? I am also sorry and do not mean to offend anyone who craves but cannot eat sugar - this isn't my intent.

Has anyone here also had problems with their cholesterol and got a fatty liver after a Diabetes diagnosis? They go hand in hand, right?

Sorry if I am being repetitive - I just want to see your opinions, especially on the one where I eventually want to drink at least 1 coffee with 1 sugar again and a slice of nutella on brown bread. Im really craving it at the moment but I know I need to get to the right body weight range before I do that.

Hope you're having a fantastic morning, afternoon or evening wherever you're from. God bless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I also read an article recently Dr Michael Mosley believes you can reverse type 2 diabetes. Here’s how

In this article, the celebrity doctor suggests that:
Late that same year, Prof Taylor led another study published in Cell Metabolism revealing why type 2 diabetes remission may occur. It suggests that if a person with type 2 diabetes loses a significant amount of weight and keeps it off, there’s a strong chance their shrunken and damaged pancreas could return to normal.

“In addition, there are a number of studies on people who have had weight loss surgery,” Dr Mosley says. “These show that 16 years later, most of the participants who kept the weight off had reversed their type 2 diabetes.”

My question is, have you ever heard of the possibility that a person's shrunken and damaged pancreas could return to normal if they were able to reverse and keep their blood sugar levels in the normal range for a certain period of time?

In another article, the celebrity doctor makes suggestions that:
“The longer you’ve had problems, the harder it is to reverse – pre-diabetes is much easier to knock on the head than if you had diabetes for 20 years – but it is possible,” he says.
 

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Lockdown was tough! My two main physical activities stopped immediately. And, at the time, it was winter here in Minnesota, so exercise outside often was -- uhh -- challenging. The stress of lockdown didn't help, either. So I have no problem believing those big and sudden changes contributed to the onset of many instances of chronic disease.

The genetic link is interesting. Based on what I've seen, I don't see genetics as a primary factor in diabetes. Countries in which high-carbohydrate foods (rice, beans, lentils, etc.) have been nutritional staples for centuries are experiencing more diabetes than ever independent of population size and birth rates. There seems to be a tie to people living more sedentary lives and eating larger portion sizes and more processed foods. And being overweight plays a strong role though statistics show no direct proportion between obesity and the rate at which people get diabetes. With those external influences I don't see genetics being a very strong factor in getting or avoiding diabetes.

Fatty-liver disease seems to fall into a similar category, too -- much more prevalent in diabetics (as diabetes is prevalent in overweight people). Fortunately, the same tools that manage diabetes and excess weight also address FLD, so if you manage one, you should be covering the others.

I am confident saying that there is no cure for diabetes at this time (short of transplanting a functioning pancreas). Diabetes can be put into remission. But I am not aware of any way to reset the metabolic pathway of glucose management in the body (besides that pancreas). Losing weight, reducing carb intake, and exercise are all good. But if you were to stop doing those things, you would show the same symptoms and experience the same side effects you are now. The diabetes has not gone away for keeps.

I did see for myself that, once I lowered and stabilized my blood glucose, the occasional influx of a lot of carbs seemed to be easier for my body to manage. Would that extend to a daily Nutella sandwich? Every diabetic handles carby foods differently. Your best way to know would be to test your blood glucose before and after eating one. Since your A1c has been around 6, not around 9 or 10, it seems your metabolism is only impaired, not pretty much done. That would help.

But that brings up a point I touched on only a little in my first post. We manage diabetes (if we do choose to do that) for our entire lives. We can minimize the damage it causes by keeping our blood glucose under strict control. But this isn't like alcoholism or smoking where we can just quit the substance and live more healthful lives. We have to eat. And food has become such a central part of our societies -- tea time/coffee breaks, drinks after work, food at sports events and funerals. Where we eat is almost as important as what we eat. That can make changing how we eat difficult. It's more than just taking in nutrients.

If one of the joys of your life is sugar in your coffee or Nutella sandwiches or beer with the guys at the football game or a baked potato once in a while, you can choose to make room for that (or something really close to it, like one sandwich instead of two) in how you manage your diabetes or you can decide that the event is worth more to you than the potential damage it can cause. If you go low-carb, maybe you cut some carbs from breakfast and dinner so you can have that sandwich. Or you choose to use an artificial sweetener in your coffee so you can spend those carbs on the Nutella. Or you just go over your allowance one day, enjoy what you've eaten, and go on.

You'll have to balance. There are so many factors which can affect our health; removing something fairly benign that we enjoy should not automatically be eliminated from our lives.

I hope that helps?
 

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The only control I have of my diabetes is the management of my blood glucose. If I can do that well enough, I don't think that the diabetes will cause a problem. It is the uncontrolled BG and higher levels of insulin in circulation that are the real culprits of damage. An occasional excursion of a small magnitude should not be too damaging if one doesn't make it a habit and then allow a few points rise become a new norm and then wash, rinse, repeat.

My main sweetener for anything I drink is stevia. Have you given that a try? I got along well with the taste of a blend of stevia and erythritol too, ie Truvia. We had a member a long time ago that found that by actually mixing a tsp of sugar and a tsp of an artificial sweetener in his coffee would kick start his pancreas in the morning. His theory was that he was getting a better insulin response because his body was reacting like all the sweetness was from sugar. You could give that a try and let your glucose monitor be the judge.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Lockdown was tough! My two main physical activities stopped immediately. And, at the time, it was winter here in Minnesota, so exercise outside often was -- uhh -- challenging. The stress of lockdown didn't help, either. So I have no problem believing those big and sudden changes contributed to the onset of many instances of chronic disease.

The genetic link is interesting. Based on what I've seen, I don't see genetics as a primary factor in diabetes. Countries in which high-carbohydrate foods (rice, beans, lentils, etc.) have been nutritional staples for centuries are experiencing more diabetes than ever independent of population size and birth rates. There seems to be a tie to people living more sedentary lives and eating larger portion sizes and more processed foods. And being overweight plays a strong role though statistics show no direct proportion between obesity and the rate at which people get diabetes. With those external influences I don't see genetics being a very strong factor in getting or avoiding diabetes.

Fatty-liver disease seems to fall into a similar category, too -- much more prevalent in diabetics (as diabetes is prevalent in overweight people). Fortunately, the same tools that manage diabetes and excess weight also address FLD, so if you manage one, you should be covering the others.

I am confident saying that there is no cure for diabetes at this time (short of transplanting a functioning pancreas). Diabetes can be put into remission. But I am not aware of any way to reset the metabolic pathway of glucose management in the body (besides that pancreas). Losing weight, reducing carb intake, and exercise are all good. But if you were to stop doing those things, you would show the same symptoms and experience the same side effects you are now. The diabetes has not gone away for keeps.

I did see for myself that, once I lowered and stabilized my blood glucose, the occasional influx of a lot of carbs seemed to be easier for my body to manage. Would that extend to a daily Nutella sandwich? Every diabetic handles carby foods differently. Your best way to know would be to test your blood glucose before and after eating one. Since your A1c has been around 6, not around 9 or 10, it seems your metabolism is only impaired, not pretty much done. That would help.

But that brings up a point I touched on only a little in my first post. We manage diabetes (if we do choose to do that) for our entire lives. We can minimize the damage it causes by keeping our blood glucose under strict control. But this isn't like alcoholism or smoking where we can just quit the substance and live more healthful lives. We have to eat. And food has become such a central part of our societies -- tea time/coffee breaks, drinks after work, food at sports events and funerals. Where we eat is almost as important as what we eat. That can make changing how we eat difficult. It's more than just taking in nutrients.

If one of the joys of your life is sugar in your coffee or Nutella sandwiches or beer with the guys at the football game or a baked potato once in a while, you can choose to make room for that (or something really close to it, like one sandwich instead of two) in how you manage your diabetes or you can decide that the event is worth more to you than the potential damage it can cause. If you go low-carb, maybe you cut some carbs from breakfast and dinner so you can have that sandwich. Or you choose to use an artificial sweetener in your coffee so you can spend those carbs on the Nutella. Or you just go over your allowance one day, enjoy what you've eaten, and go on.

You'll have to balance. There are so many factors which can affect our health; removing something fairly benign that we enjoy should not automatically be eliminated from our lives.

I hope that helps?
I can't thank you enough - Your words at times might be tough to absorb but are inspiring. You offer hope that life isn't over and provide awesome suggestions such as perhaps using artificial sweeteners instead of sugar. I can definitely give that a go so that I can at least enjoy my coffee in the mornings. Once again, thank you very much for taking the time out to respond.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The only control I have of my diabetes is the management of my blood glucose. If I can do that well enough, I don't think that the diabetes will cause a problem. It is the uncontrolled BG and higher levels of insulin in circulation that are the real culprits of damage. An occasional excursion of a small magnitude should not be too damaging if one doesn't make it a habit and then allow a few points rise become a new norm and then wash, rinse, repeat.

My main sweetener for anything I drink is stevia. Have you given that a try? I got along well with the taste of a blend of stevia and erythritol too, ie Truvia. We had a member a long time ago that found that by actually mixing a tsp of sugar and a tsp of an artificial sweetener in his coffee would kick start his pancreas in the morning. His theory was that he was getting a better insulin response because his body was reacting like all the sweetness was from sugar. You could give that a try and let your glucose monitor be the judge.
Thanks for the reply mbuster. I will give stevia as a artifical sweetener a try. Mixing sugar and artificial sweetener sounds interesting. When you say it kick started his pancreas, what do you mean? Is that a good thing or a bad thing?

I definitely see this "prediabetes" as a wake up call, a sign that my lifestyle needs to change. I will continue to regularly exercise, I will lose my weight, and I will eat more healthy. Once I get to my ideal body weight range, I still plan to exercise regularly but perhaps from 7 days to 5 of 30-45 minutes of moderate-high intensity workouts AND I will try eating healthy most of the time. In other words, I will not go back to my old lifestyle of eating a whole 180g of milk chocolate - perhaps I might try to eat 4 small blocks per day instead. I just hope this won't undo all the hard work ive done. But I definitely know that I can't go back to the diet I have been consuming prior to this diagnosis.
 

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This should be a link to one of his posts about it. There may be more post.
 

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I will not go back to my old lifestyle of eating a whole 180g of milk chocolate - perhaps I might try to eat 4 small blocks per day instead.
My experience (not necessarily universal) is that a little of the really good stuff is as satisfying (or more so) as a lot more of the middling stuff. I prefer really dark chocolate to milk chocolate but I can eat 3/4 ounce (approximately 20g) of an 85-90% dark chocolate and it only costs me 5 g of carbohydrates and I feel like I've eaten something decadent. The same with beefsteak or pork: I can be happy with much less of the better-quality cuts. Kind of evens out the price difference, too.

Oh, and thank you for the kind words, dyara. Life definitely is not over. It may have to change, but humans make changes like that all the time. You can, too. There are all kinds of ideas (stevia, darker chocolate, etc.). Please hang around for a while here and explore the other forums; you'll see we've gotten pretty resourceful and we're willing to share what we know.
 
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