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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This post describes the diet that I've gradually adopted over the last two years to successfully deal with my non-insulin-dependent Type 2 diabetes.

I'm a sixty-six-years old non-insulin dependent Type 2 on metformin. I was diagnosed nearly ten years ago in the very early stages with a fasting level of 7.2 (130) and an HbA1c of only 5.7%. My situation slowly progressed - i.e. deteriorated - for eight years by following the "do not test" and "eat plenty of starchy carbohydrate" advice that is so often given by healthcare professionals to Type 2s in the UK. Even though my progression was relatively slow, around seven years later my HbA1c eventually reached 9.4% and my GP started to prescribe metformin (1000mg per day) - and then around a year later he doubled the dosage to 2000mg because my HbA1C was still at 8.5%.

At that stage and against my doctor’s advice, I started to test and by doing that soon came to understand the effect that different foods had on my blood glucose levels. By using that information and gradually changing my diet over the last two years, I have fully reversed my Type 2 diabetic situation. Today, all my numbers are better than they were at diagnosis - in most of the cases by a massive amount. If I went to the doctor today then by the most-commonly-used diagnostic tests - fasting blood glucose levels or HbA1c - they would say that I did not have diabetes. Moreover, any symptoms of diabetes that I had experieced have all disappeared

Basically, the main thing that I've done is to cut out almost all the starchy carbohydrates - e.g. cereals, bread, potatoes, pizza mainly but I'm also very careful with rice and pasta too. In my opinion this has been by far and away the main reason for my dramatic improvement in blood glucose levels.

My HbA1c has dropped from a high of 9.4% to in the 5s the last six tests - and a lowest-ever of 5.0% last time. I'm hoping to take it below 5% very soon. My doctor has recently started to reduce my metformin medication from 2000mg to 1000mg per day. I’m shortly due to have blood tests with a view to reducing it further or stopping it altogether.

I have described below the diet that I've basically settled down to eating. This diet wasn't adopted overnight and isn't something that I've read about. My current diet which evolved slowly by testing - to see what effect different foods had on my blood glucose levels - and then slowly adjusting my diet accordingly. My current typical eating and drinking patterns are as follows:

Breakfast

Usually grilled (but sometimes fried) bacon, tomatoes and mushrooms - sometimes an egg too.

- Or, mushroom, bacon, cheese omelette.

- Or, if I ever eat cereals instead these days it's always a low-GI/GL nut-based granola. I eat no other kind of cereal whatsoever these days – not even porridge.

- Or, occasionally, low-fat natural yoghurt with berry fruits instead with a sprinkling (two teaspoons) of the granola.

I never eat bread or any cereals except the nut-based granola at breakfast – and certainly no porridge.


Lunch

Almost always meat (usually ham or chicken) or fish or low-fat cottage cheese with a big salad (lettuce, spring onions, peppers, radishes, celery, cucumber, cherry tomatoes, with a few grapes or chopped apple) - with a small amount of linseed/flax seeds added - plus a dressing made with olive oil and apple cider vinegar.

No bread or potatoes – except very occasionally and – if I do - only a very small amount – and I mean a very small amount.

If I'm in a pub lunch situation then I usually eat beef or gammon steak with vegetables - sometimes with a few chips. Salads are another very good option too when eating out.

Evening Meal

Meat (usually chicken) or fish with various vegetables - sometimes as a stew type meal.

Sometimes I eat a small amount of low-GI type brown rice or spelt or pulse pasta or something similar.

I’ve recently started to substitute cauliflower for potatoes to make such things as cauli-mash cottage pie, or cauli-rice type dishes. I’ve found that such dishes give very good post-meal blood-glucose readings. Cauliflower is a great substitute for potatoes.

Never any bread or potatoes - or anything like pizza, naan bread, chapattis or suchlike even if I'm in a restaurant - except very occasionally. If I do eat any of these foods it would only be a very small amount – a piece.

Snacks

I eat fruit throughout the day and every day - loads of it - as well-spaced-out snacks - never as part of another meal apart from where shown above - I pick the smallest pieces of fruit that I can find and eat all the following every day usually sometimes more than one of each (but never at the same time) - apples, pears, satsumas, plums frequently - and occasionally, bananas, kiwis, peaches or grapes. I fill my pockets with fruit whenever I leave the house and eat it as I move about. However, a word of warning about fruit, quite a lot of people with diabetes tell me that fruit causes their blood glucose to rise to high levels so, if eating fruit, people need to test to establish what it does to their levels.

The rest of the time, I nibble at small portions of:

A small amount of mixed nuts and dried fruit - every day.

Low-fat yoghurts.

Low-fat cheese - with one or two oatcakes.

Low fat/light cottage cheese with pineapple.

Oily fish - rich in omega-3 types - sardines, mackerels etc.

Pickles - beetroot, cucumber, onions, red cabbage etc.

Cherry tomatoes

Cold vegetables if there are any in the fridge.

Ice cream is just about my only weakness and very occasionally, I eat an ice cream cone. I stress very occasionally.

In general, I never eat packets of crisps, buns, biscuits, sweets, chocolate, cake and suchlike on a regular basis. On vary rare occasions indeed, I might eat one biscuit or one small piece of chocolate – I stress this would be on very rare occasions indeed. I might have a few crisps or small piece of cake or bun in a buffet situation.

Alcohol

I used to drink a lot of alcohol but these days drink very little (about five units a week and certainly less than ten) - mainly the odd glass of red wine or sometimes a small whisky. Very rarely, I will have a little more red wine on a special occasion when out for the evening and I'm not driving. These days, I rarely ever drink alcohol in the house even though my wife and family do. I must say, it wasn't always like that!

Other Drinks

Various teas (spiced, earl gray, redbush etc, etc) and coffee (mainly decaffeinated but not always) all black with a sweetener - I try to vary the drinks depending on the time of day.

If I ever do use milk - e.g. with the granola or in drinks - it is always the 0.75% or 1% fat milk types.

I drink sparkling bottled water or just plain old simple tap water by the pint with my evening meal.

Occasionally I might drink a Zero or Diet type of soft drink.

I never drink fruit juice or non-Zero drinks and only very rarely any beer or lager these days

Supplements

I’ve never been a person for taking supplements but these days I’ve started to use the following on a daily basis:

- a multivitamin tablet once per day
- an omega-3 one capsule once per day
- an apple cider vinegar tablet last thing at night
- Occasional, use of cinnamon (sprinkling on foods, in teas etc)

Please don't ask me whether any of these supplements are helpful because I've absolutely no idea.

Weight Loss & Exercise

I’ve lost more than 5 stones on weight - i.e. more than 30 kgs. I'm intent to eventually take my BMI to below 25 - i.e. into the normal weight band - I'm almost at that stage with a BMI of around 28 - down from a BMI of just under40. I might take it as low as a BMI of 22.5 - i.e. my supposed "ideal weight" as defined by the health people. To achieve that weight loss, I ate a diet of around 1,300 to 1,500 calories per day most days and occasionally (about once a week just a little more). Despite that, I never felt hungry!

I don't put very much of my improvement in blood glucose readings - if any at all - down to my loss in weight. Why not? Quite simply because the lowering of blood glucose levels came about immediately that I started to change my diet - i.e. in days or weeks. I say this because I found that I didn't have to wait until I'd lost a lot of weight before I got my improvement and that may help to motivate others who find losing weight to be difficult. In my opinion and in my case, I consider that it was the dietary change that was most important - i.e. mainly the cutting back dramatically on my starchy carbohydrate intake which led to my improvement.

In addition, I do very little exercise and when I do it's nothing other than just ordinary walking - just a very occasional two to three mile of relatively easy walking – and nothing severe. I really ought to try to do much more exercise for my general health and well-being. The effect of exercise on lowering blood glucose levels is something that I’m trying to test out and experimenting with to try to establish how effective this might be in improving my control still further.

I think that covers just about everything. I hope that other people with non-insulin-dependent Type 2 diabetes might find this detailed summary of my current eating habits useful and that my experience might be helpful to them in dealing with getting control of their own Type 2 situations.

To summarise, my simplified basic advice to any non-insulin-dependent Type 2 is to start to test if you don't do so already. Then cut back on the starchy carbohydrates that you eat - i.e. cereals, bread, potatoes, pasta, rice, pizza etc. That usually leads to a big improvement in blood glucose levels - and quickly too!

If anyone has any further questions then feel free to get in touch because I'd be very happy to explain anything that needs clarification.

Best wishes – John
 

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Thank you very much John for this informative post

I am a newley diagnosed type 2 (yesterday) and your posting has given me much food for thought.

My best wishes and I hope things keep going well for you

Brendan
 

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For what it's worth, Brendan . . . I think you'd be miles ahead embarking on John's regimen here than the cancertutor plan. Here is basic good wholesome nutrition - nothing exotic about it. And the best thing about it is, it's been proven over and over again to actually WORK!

Just sayin' . . . ;)
 

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Fantastic post John! Thank you for taking the time to share it with us.

I too am a type 2 non-insulin taking diabetic. I am going on 8.5 months out now.

My goodness that's a lot of food to consume in one day! lol

Since my diagnosis, I've given up most all man made carbs.
If its white, it ain't right! That goes for all types of bread, pasta and rice ,they are all bad
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you very much John for this informative post

I am a newley diagnosed type 2 (yesterday) and your posting has given me much food for thought.

My best wishes and I hope things keep going well for you

Brendan
Glad that you think that you might find it useful Brendan. I hope that my post will help you on your Type 2 journey!

Just remember that I did develop it slowly over a period of time - i.e. not overnight. Also, please remember that it is what worked for me and that not necessarily all of it will work the same for you. It is important to do some testing so you get to learn what effect different foods have on your body. Just gradually adjust your diet according to what your meter tells you. How far you choose to go is up to you!

Good luck and very best wishes - John
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Fantastic post John! Thank you for taking the time to share it with us.

I too am a type 2 non-insulin taking diabetic. I am going on 8.5 months out now.

My goodness that's a lot of food to consume in one day! lol

Since my diagnosis, I've given up most all man made carbs.
If its white, it ain't right! That goes for all types of bread, pasta and rice ,they are all bad
Hi ThoseBackPages - It's good to meet you!

Thanks for the kind words. You sound to be doing just great and after only 8.5 months. I wish that I'd learnt what was and was not important as early as you. It took me eight years to learn the way to go. I do regret the damage that will have been done to my body in that time.

I'm with you on what you say about "bread, pasta and rice" - I'd add cereals, potatoes, pizza etc too. However, I still do eat very small (and I mean very small!) amounts of all these foods very occasionally.

Very best wishes - John
 

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Hi John ,

I am new to diabetes ..
I would like to know what best time period test BG after eating fruits ?

Best time period for Rice ? Example Brown Rice
Best time period for Drinks ? Example Beer?
Best time period for fruits ?
I must check everytime one type of fruit and check ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
For what it's worth, Brendan . . . I think you'd be miles ahead embarking on John's regimen here than the cancertutor plan. Here is basic good wholesome nutrition - nothing exotic about it. And the best thing about it is, it's been proven over and over again to actually WORK!

Just sayin' . . . ;)
Brendan,

I'm with Shanny on what she says here - if for no other reason that the cancertutor thing looks overly complicated.

You don't need to do anything that complicated to get control of your non-insulin-dependent Type 2 condition. All you need to do is to make a few adjustments to the type of things that you eat.

You've come to this site at the right time - i.e. so quickly after diagnosis. Stick around - do not drift away! You'll do OK!

Good luck - John
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi John ,

I am new to diabetes ..
I would like to know what best time period test BG after eating fruits ?

Best time period for Rice ? Example Brown Rice
Best time period for Drinks ? Example Beer?
Best time period for fruits ?
I must check everytime one type of fruit and check ?
Hi AndhraKing - It's good to meet you!

I stress that I am a non-insulin-dependent Type 2 and am speaking in relation to that condition only.

As far as I'm concerned, time of testing depends a lot on what stage you are at with your condition.

I think that testing first thing in a morning is one of the most important because it tells you a lot about you general level of control. If you are doing that and getting readings of say 4 to 7 (75 to 125) then you would seem to be doing OK.

For someone who is still running very high blood glucose levels then testing one hour after finishing eating becomes slightly meaningless - perhaps two or three hours after finishing eating is better in such cases until the levels become more normal.

Again, as far as I'm concerned, one of the most important reasons to test is to find how high a particular food or meal takes you. Most people are usually at their highest around one hour after finishing eating so I think that is an ideal time to test once that you have a reasonable amount of control. The important thing to do then is to try to work out which foods sent you high and then to reduce the amount or eliminate that food the next time you eat.

It really is just a gradual process of adjusting your diet.

Good luck and best wishes - John
 

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Hi thanks for your quick reply .

1) I am not using any medication.
2) Morning BG always will be 105 to 116

today after 2hr Breakfast 123 .

I will follow your footsteps and try to lead life without any medication .
Thanks
AndhraKing
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi thanks for your quick reply .

1) I am not using any medication.
2) Morning BG always will be 105 to 116

today after 2hr Breakfast 123 .

I will follow your footsteps and try to lead life without any medication .
Thanks
AndhraKing
Hi again,

Those levels sound just great - they are normal non-diabetic levels.

At this stage, I'd suggest testing one hour after finishing eating. Maybe, you will find readings around 10 (180) or higher. Just work on getting those levels lower.

Keep well away from the medications if you can. That's the best way to go but not everyone can do it!

John
 

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Hi ,
You are right , after 1h My Bg was 235 . So is it too high having 230 + after 1h ???

Before Dinner it was : 106 .

Food for dinner : Wheat + Egg white + Beans + Rice small cup with curd .

Please advice .
 

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Hi ,
You are right , after 1h My Bg was 235 . So is it too high having 230 + after 1h ???

Before Dinner it was : 106 .

Food for dinner : Wheat + Egg white + Beans + Rice small cup with curd .

Please advice .
Yes, too high. Cut the beans and the rice
 

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Hi ,
You are right , after 1h My Bg was 235 . So is it too high having 230 + after 1h ???

Before Dinner it was : 106 .

Food for dinner : Wheat + Egg white + Beans + Rice small cup with curd .

Please advice .
I would guess that big spike is coming from the beans and the rice. Try substituting some fresh vegetables.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi ,
You are right , after 1h My Bg was 235 . So is it too high having 230 + after 1h ???

Before Dinner it was : 106 .

Food for dinner : Wheat + Egg white + Beans + Rice small cup with curd .

Please advice .
Yes - 235 one hour after finishing eating is much too high. In fact, I've never recorded a reading as high as that since I started testing. However, I must have had levels that high before that when my HbA1c was at 9.4%.

As others have said, it is likely that it was the rice that caused you to go high. However, I don't even recocognise what you mean by wheat and curd. Also, what sort of beans and how much?

Try to think meat, fish and dairy with salad and/or vegetables.

Best wishes - John
 

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That spike is about 100 points higher than anything I would tolerate in my own diet. You started out at 106, Andhra, which is a perfectly acceptable pre-meal level. Spiking nearly 130 points is not acceptable. Keeping your blood sugar under 140 at all times is a good goal.

The wheat, beans & rice are prob'ly all co-conspirators in this way-too-high spike.
 

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Those two days i never checked and I ate wheat flour which is packed with sugar .
Hi Wolly,Please tell me after 1h MY BG was around 165 to 170 last 2 days . is it ok ?
I am waiting for your reply .
Lunch : 100grams Brownrice with indian curry + curd
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Those two days i never checked and I ate wheat flour which is packed with sugar .
Hi Wolly,Please tell me after 1h MY BG was around 165 to 170 last 2 days . is it ok ?
I am waiting for your reply .
Lunch : 100grams Brownrice with indian curry + curd
Hi agai,

A lot better than the 235 but still too high for me at 170. I try to keep below 140 at all times and I know that others try for the same target too.

However, it takes a little bit of time to achieve good control. Just keep working at getting the levels lower.

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
"Stop the metformin - Come back in 3 months"

Just updating on this thread, I've just been to see my GP to review my latest blood test results.

He's agreed for me to stop taking the metformin altogether and go back to see him in 3 months.

It makes what I've done over the last two years so worthwhile! What a result!

John
 
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