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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Had a bit of a shock today. The American College of Physicians wants higher bg numbers in hospitals. :eek:

In-Hospital Blood Sugar Levels Should Be Higher

But as long as I'm conscious and not handcuffed they aren't going to be in charge of that part. If I can help it.

I can see that it was probably because a few people wound up unconscious, and shortening the diabetic's life expectancy was the easiest way around it. Nice to know someone really cares.

AND, a nurse accidentally give 1000 units of insulin instead of 10. :eek: :eek: :eek:

Diabetes Disaster #21: Dosage Mix-up Consequences

Maybe I should edit the title too. Don't go near a hospital.
 

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The inmates are running the asylum! Is it not a time-honored tenet of diabetes that high bg impedes healing? Is not a hospital where people go to HEAL?! Are the insurance companies not campaigning for ever-shorter hospital stays? What's a patient to do? :mad: :mad: :mad:
 

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The inmates are running the asylum! Is it not a time-honored tenet of diabetes that high bg impedes healing? Is not a hospital where people go to HEAL?! Are the insurance companies not campaigning for ever-shorter hospital stays? What's a patient to do? :mad: :mad: :mad:
When I was in the hospital recently I had a really good experience regarding my diabetes actually. They asked me on admission what my blood sugar goals were and how was I managing to get to those numbers. They didnt give me any grief about continuing to use my pump while I was there. They did come check my blood sugar before meals and whenever I had to take my prednisone...but I took care of my insulin delivery. I just kept track of what I was taking on a piece of paper and the nurse would copy the info down to put in my chart for documentation. Even though I was sick and on steriods, I pretty much maintained my bg level at a manageable level.

And as a side note...whatever licensed nurse that would be boneheaded enough to give anyone 10ml of regular insulin needed to be reported to the board of nursing....just saying..
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've been thinking about this since posting it, and just have time for a quick stop here.

When I was in the hospital recently I had a really good experience regarding my diabetes actually. They asked me on admission what my blood sugar goals were and how was I managing to get to those numbers. They didnt give me any grief about continuing to use my pump while I was there. They did come check my blood sugar before meals and whenever I had to take my prednisone...but I took care of my insulin delivery. I just kept track of what I was taking on a piece of paper and the nurse would copy the info down to put in my chart for documentation. Even though I was sick and on steriods, I pretty much maintained my bg level at a manageable level.

And as a side note...whatever licensed nurse that would be boneheaded enough to give anyone 10ml of regular insulin needed to be reported to the board of nursing....just saying..
That is really nice to hear and relieves some of the worries I had about controlling insulin delivery in a hospital after reading the first article.

It is so sad that the patient died. (second article) But even if they had managed to save him/er, they would have had to pump the glucose equal to about 60 boxes of chocolate to balance out that insulin at the rates I use it. Since it was put into an IV tube the effect of the insulin would be nearly immediate, not drawn out like it would be if injected into fatty tissue.

A sugar hit like that at one time would have a chance of killing me all by itself.

Since it was a death, I suppose a lot of paperwork went along with it, to the proper authorities.
 

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Had a bit of a shock today. The American College of Physicians wants higher bg numbers in hospitals. :eek:

In-Hospital Blood Sugar Levels Should Be Higher

But as long as I'm conscious and not handcuffed they aren't going to be in charge of that part. If I can help it.

I can see that it was probably because a few people wound up unconscious, and shortening the diabetic's life expectancy was the easiest way around it. Nice to know someone really cares.

AND, a nurse accidentally give 1000 units of insulin instead of 10. :eek: :eek: :eek:

Diabetes Disaster #21: Dosage Mix-up Consequences

Maybe I should edit the title too. Don't go near a hospital.
When I was in the hospital in 2010, the nurses made me feel uneasy and everytime that it was time for insulin, I knew it would be a fight. A couple of times, I just let them do what they wanted to do. The nurses didn't seem to care if you were high but made a huge fuss when you were low, at no point was I ever given a correction dose to bring down a high and I had many 200 readings at the hospital, I never had this problem at home. I think it is the sliding scale used in the hospital, it is a fast way to give out insulin, although I feel it is one of the worst way to manage blood sugar.
 
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I haven't been to the hospital since diagnosis but the stories on this forum and other places have me a little uneasy. However, when I was diagnosed they did give me actual insulin shots instead of an IV insulin drip. At least I can control what foods I'm eating.
 
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