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I don't see how it's possible to function on 600 calories per day for 2 months!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The BBC article reported the diet was liquid diet drinks and lots of veg.

Two months of near starvation. I think I'd give it a go if the docs thought it could help n if it meant the chance of not requiring tablets, fingerpricks and poss. Future on insulin.

I'd need to do it in a hospital though as I get wellllllll moody when hungry :D
 

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600 calories is ridiculous. They were probably all exhausted the entire time.

I'm guessing the diet was extremely low-carb, based on what information they gave... Instead of a 600 calorie low-carb diet, they should give the people a NORMAL calorie (for each persons metabolism/needs) low-carb diet.

They'd most likely have the same results, but MUCH better energy levels, etc.
 

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Usually if you eat less than 1200 calories a day your metabolism slows down to conserve fat and your liver kicks in to produce more glucose, so you don't starve. I don't believe this study at all. I would be curious what these people ate before the study. Probably any reduction in calories would have helped them.
 

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The big question is for how long were they "cured" 6 month, 10 years?
Well, with only eleven people being tested, and being on a non-maintainable diet, all of them "reversed" the symptoms after two months, but after three months already four had gone back to the complications.

My guess is by six months, all of them had reverted back to their pre-research diet and all of them had their complications/symptoms back.

600 calorie/day diets are not maintainable. Period. Obviously people will go back to what they were doing before, and obviously their symptoms will come back.

My worry is after six months time, the researchers will say that this was a LOW-CARB diet, and that their research shows that "in the long term, low-carb diets simply cannot be maintained" ... or some other nonsense.
 

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from my my point of view, being that you are only 27 years old:
i would think that you are taking too much glycozide and then over eating carbohydrates to compensate. if you would just back off little by little on the glycozide and reduce your carbs to compensate instead of the other way around you might not even need glycozide in two months. sounds like you could do it on a 1200 or 1800 calorie diet. just how many carbs are you eating now? have you really ever counted all the carbs you are eating?

using novolog to check, what is your insulin sensitivity?
at 10 mg/dl ( 2 carbs ) per 1 unit novolog ------ no way
at 20 mg/dl ( 4 carbs ) per 1 unit novolog ------ only with great difficulty
at 40 mg/dl ( 8 carbs ) per 1 unit novolog ------ most likely you could use a low carbohydrate life style and discontinue all diabetic medications.

this is all an approximation of course.

ColaJim


Can diet alone reverse Type 2 diabetes? - Diabetes UK

Not sure if it would work for me as I was told the other week that I'm type 1 but unlike most type 1's I'm still producing insulin at a high level so I can be treated as a type 2. I have my week 8 appointment in 2 weeks time so will ask them about this research whilst I'm there.
 

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The article stresses that people "not try this at home", as it were. Check the last two paragraphs.
Moreover ...

I would not try it on a train.
I would not fly it on a plane.
600 calories??? Insane!
I smell a hint of scam -- yes, ma'am!

That said, if the study does eventually lead to improved treatment for any type of diabetes, more power to 'em!
 

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I just a look at the actual press release from Newcastle University. They quote a 67 year old participant that is still diabetes free after 18 months. It would be interesting to know how many of the 11 participants are still diabetes free but even if it is only one or two then in my opinion it is worthwhile to have a closer look at this diet. They might have stumbled on something here that justifies further research. To go on this diet for 8 weeks will most probably be an ordeal... Let's face it, most of us just love food... But even if there is a 10% percent chance of getting healed it is worthwhile.
 

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My concern is about the love of food, but about how a person can go about their daily lives (e.g., care for children/elders, hold down a job) while consuming only 600 calories a day for 2 months.
 

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Most of us have some energy reserves (excess weight) which, together with a 600 cal diet, will most probably see us through for 8 weeks. It won't be easy thats for sure and I cringe to think that I must survive on 600 cal and I already battle on 2000 cal. But I hate this disease and if 8 weeks of suffering can bring about a permanent metabolic change, i will definately consider.
 

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Correcting my tyop on post above: My concern is not about the love of food. :eek:

I've come to recognize that food has always been a major foe for my entire family. In addition to rampant diabetes, there's a lot of lactose intolerance and, I now reluctantly and sadly suspect, gluten sensitivity or true Celiac as well.

But, except for me, and for only a couple of years at that, obesity is not a family feature. And my habits weren't all that bad, by normal standards! (I'm now plumpish, but not obese. Totally within family specs. Still, working hard to chisel it off.)

I devoutly wish for a food-free diet. Liquids and pills only. Less math, better control. Being a medically-ordered non-eater might even make social occasions easier. Less chance of insulting one's host, if one honestly can't eat anything. Ahhhhh, well ...

It would be fantastic if this study has uncovered one of diabetes' closely held secrets. But it seems to me, at best, premature to call this a cure. Jenny Ruhl's warnings seem quite valid to me.

Yet, I do understand the desire. And, admittedly, simply going low-carb-high-fat appears every bit as extreme to many, professionals and laypersons alike.

But I would never attempt something like this 600-calorie program without constant professional supervision and heavy supplements. Preferably, 2 months as an in-patient in a hospital or spa. And if, and only if, many subsequent reputable reports come in.
 

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From the time I quit smoking cold turkey 27 years ago, I realized I could also be thin, IF I could just quit EATING completely! Never light up again - never take another bite of food again. Whatta life!
 

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I agree with both of you! I also agree that it is definately premature to talk about a cure too... But allthough I have HUGE respect for Jenny's opinion I also think it is premature to shoot this research down and compare it with low carb dieting. I eat low carb and at best it only keeps
my bg under reasonable control. The moment I eat 'normal' it spikes within an hour. The fact that some participants remained free from diabetes symptoms even when reverting back to eat 'normal' for at least three months after this ultra low carb diet is remarkable. It can not be ascribed to weightloss only. We all know that weightloss makes diabetes more manageable but it does not take away the disease as such. IMHO this research must be supported by us diabetics. At least it is not research that is in the interest of big pharma. If they have stumbled across something significant with this research it will be a major breakthrough. What is needed urgently though is a repeat study with a larger experimental group.

Back to the practicalities... To survive on 600 cal for a limited period of time is certainly possible but to live on 600 cal.... Yes I agree it most likely to be going one hell of an experiene... With the emphasis on hell. But, It is all about motivation I assume. The 67yr old participant who is still diabetes free after 18 months is quoted in the press release stating how difficult it was to get used to the diet. He had to keep him busy all the time to take his mind of food. On the other hand it is possible to fast and I myself fasted for up to 5 days in the past to give my liver and pancreas a rest. The first day or two is actually the worst but then it gets better. I guess I'm busy with some selftalk to convince myself that even I can do it lol.

I will definately follow any further research closely and with an open mind. Just hope that this research gets the necessary funding to be repeated on a bigger scale.
 
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