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I quit December 13, 2011. I'm coming up on my 2-year anniversary. I smoked on and off (mostly on) for about 10 years. I was one of those late doomers who didn't start until I was old enough not to know better (30s).

I had quit twice before, once for two and a half years, and the other for about 9 months. Both times cold turkey. Stress always led me back.

I knew I needed something different, and I never thought that the nicotine patch would work. Somehow I knew that it wasn't so much the nicotine that kept me addicted, it had to be, at least in part, the action of smoking, perhaps. So, I went the e-cig route, went through several types and settled on my beloved Provari. It took a while to find my all-day vape.

I would like to say that if I did not have my e-cigarette that I would never return to smoking. Yep. Would love to say that. :D

In looking through e-cig forums, I found that unless you commit to only using the e-cig, it would be more difficult to actually quit the other 3,998 chemicals you get from each and every one of those cigarettes. It wasn't easy. I experienced the difficult 2-month, 4-month, 6-month, etc.. challenges that come with quitting cigarettes; those that give you anti-depressant affects, those that increase nicotine absorption, etc.. I found that nicotine is the easiest of those drugs to come off of.. The rest? It was a challenge. Every once in a blue moon, it's still a challenge, albeit a lesser one. :)
 

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tried to stop smoking but after 3 weeks I bdgin to smoke again really it soo diffcult to face cigarette craving every day.i know smoking is very bad for diabetics.i wish to try champix.(chantix) but fear from side effects and I hear about it may increase blood sugar.any help?
I stopped the easy way. My cardiologist told me to give him the names of 5 people with aFib and diabetes who were smoking at 60 and he would buy me a carton. I couldn't do it. I went outside, pulled out the pack and tossed it in the garbage can. Amazing what absolute fear can do for one.

That was 20 years ago and it was my wife that was diabetic at that time. 4 years ago I came down with Influenza A/H1N1 and the subsequent acute bacterial pneumonia that some get with it. I spent three weeks on TOTAL life support in a coma and then came back. I was code blue twice. They wanted to unplug me at one point. And as I left the critical care unit the therapist said something to me that I pass along to everyone I love:

"Had you not quit smoking when you did, my friend, you would not be with us right now. Thank goodness you had the good sense to quit. It saved your life."

It was one of the toughest things I have ever done. I was cranky and miserable for weeks if not months. Today the smell of tobacco smoke makes me ill.

Whatever it takes. If you want to live - do whatever it takes. Please.

You are among friends here.
 

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I would be tempted to say that quitting with nicotine replacements doesn't work since it never worked for me. Then again, quitting without gum or patches only worked once in 27 years of smoking, and that was 5 years ago.
 

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I am a nicotine addict. I started smoking cigarettes when I was 13 years old. The first time I quit I was in my 30's, quit for nearly a year and then I was convinced I could "just have one once in a while". The next time I quit was in my 40's, almost made it 2 years when once again I thought I could "just have one once in a while". The next several quits were in my 50's, never more than two years and guess what - thought I could "just have one once in a while".

Just like controlling diabetes, knowledge is power. I now know I'm an addict when it comes to nicotine and I now know the only way I can actually quit is to "never take another puff".

For anyone trying to quit, I highly recommend a visit to whyquit.com

Good luck, it's not easy but you can do it!
 

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I quit cold turkey 30 years ago and it was a great many years before I stopped having occasional cravings - just out-of-the-blue hankerings for a good long drag. But I never did light up again, and they seem to have stopped now.
 

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I was a smoker when I was 22, stopped smoking in less than a year from when I started. During that short time I smoked about a pack of Winstons a day. I guess I never really got addicted, though, in that short time, since I had relatively little trouble quitting, and few cravings to ever smoke again since.
 

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I started when I was about 19 and smoked until I found out I was pregnant, at 32. After my son was born, I started again and smoked until he was four. It will be five years in November that I've quit. I also went cold turkey and am at a point where the cravings have subsided, for the most part. Once in a great while, I will notice under times of stress that I am wanting one, but it's usually a passing thought.
 

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I had my first cigarette at 8 years old (just one) and then started smoking regularly at 23 years old. I smoked until my heart attack on March 21, 2011 and before that day, I had tried patches, nicotine gum, tablets... everything! At one point, I was walking around with two full strength patches on each arm and smoking at the same time! On that day, I quit. No gum, no patches, no Champix, nothing. It was either 1) continue smoking and risk an early death or 2) get control of my life and quit smoking, start exercising and eat better. I never had cravings and I went through my cold turkey routine without problem. It's as torontodiabeticguy stated: "If you want to live - do whatever it takes. Please."

It's now been 3 years since that heart attack and the only repercussion to quitting is that I haven't been sick once (not even the slightest!) since that heart attack.
 

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I think my point got lost in my long winded reply.

whyquit.com was the single most helpful information resource that really helped me quit.

Once you get past the doom and gloom on the main page it is very much like bloodsugar101 - but for smoking.

Yes it would seem stupid to not realize smoking is bad for you, yet many people have a very hard time quitting. To understand why that is happening is a good first step in quitting the insanity of that addiction.

And congratulations to all that have quit!
 

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I think my point got lost in my long winded reply.

whyquit.com was the single most helpful information resource that really helped me quit.

Once you get past the doom and gloom on the main page it is very much like bloodsugar101 - but for smoking.

Yes it would seem stupid to not realize smoking is bad for you, yet many people have a very hard time quitting. To understand why that is happening is a good first step in quitting the insanity of that addiction.

And congratulations to all that have quit!

I remember visiting that page while in the midst of quitting and I loved the Quit Smoking Benefits Timetable there. It really puts everything into focus and provides quite a bit of motivation (especially when you are having a tough time of it). I also applaud all who have succeeded in quitting. I often think that those that preach quitting smoking but who have never smoked in their lives have no idea just how difficult it is and how addicted one becomes.
 

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So Henry? You've been non-smoking for five years then?
Shanny, I don't log in very often so I missed your reply. Yes, I stopped smoking on August 8, 2008. Strange to say, quitting seemed impossible, this last time however, I have not had any great difficultly with it. That said, if you really want to quit you will, but you have to be rather unambiguous about wanting to quit.
 

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I Quit smoking just over a year ago, and so glad I did. I smoked for about 20 years, and managed to quite for a 1 1/2 years somewhere in that. But when it got around to quitting later, it seemed like I couldn't do it. I was smoking just over a pack a day.

Then I discovered 'vaping' and it got me off smoking all together. I don't smell like smoke anymore and don't have to feel guilty about it.

For anyone that's looking to quit smoking, I suggest vaping. I've had the occasional real smoke and it's just disgusting, I can't even do it anymore.
 

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I remember visiting that page while in the midst of quitting and I loved the Quit Smoking Benefits Timetable there. It really puts everything into focus and provides quite a bit of motivation (especially when you are having a tough time of it). I also applaud all who have succeeded in quitting. I often think that those that preach quitting smoking but who have never smoked in their lives have no idea just how difficult it is and how addicted one becomes.
Oh we realize it, one reason why i never picked up a cigarette.
 
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