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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been testing daily for years, first thing in the AM, roughly 12 hours from last meal. A relative is now showing signs of diabetes, but her doc wants 90 days of testing, no fasting, and then average it.

I was surprised at this, but learned it's common.

Without fasting, how can it be accurate? Or am I missing something?
 

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I'm not sure what the doctor is going for. 90 days of testing in the morning? After meals? Or is the doctor talking about an A1c? The doctor may be concerned about high highs and low lows generating an anomaly between a chart of BG and an A1c (90 days for both) but it's hard for me to say without a few more details.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, forgot to note that. He's checking A1C to average 90 days of tests. I need to ask more questions.
 

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I'm interested in the logic when you find out more info. Seems like the best thing to do would be to wear a CGM for 90 days and keep a diary. Thats getting a reading every five minutes around the clock except when swapping sensors. Thats a lot more data than checking with a meter no matter what kind of frequency they use.
 
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Well, let us help; let us know what you find out and we'll try to unbend it. :)
 

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If it’s just an A1C test, it’s pretty a straightforward lab draw. Hemoglobin in your blood gets coated with sugar over time; the degree of that determines your average blood sugar level over a couple months. That timeline is due to the typical lifespan of a red blood cell (about 120 days).
 

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As I understand it, an A1c is average blood glucose for the past 90 days, not just fasting. You can have a good fasting glucose number but post prandial could be too high based on what you're eating. Maybe this doctor wants to check average random glucose to the A1c at the end of the 90 days. A CGM would do the same thing but that's expensive.
 

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2 issues with A1c, it can be converted to an average daily BG and an average can be a wide array of numbers, and it goes on the assumption that everyone has an average blood cell life cycle of 120 days. My BH is a good example, and she is not diagnosed as diabetic. After eating, her BG usually is higher than mine, sometimes in the 200s, lingers high before coming back down, but her A1c is usually 4.9-5.1%. Maybe her red blood cells life cycle is shorter, I don't guess we've ever thought to ask them to check.

We don't eat the same foods, she has reduced total carbs, buts eats way more than I do.

The impact of red blood cell lifespan on HbA1c measurement
Current interpretation of HbA1c values, which corresponds to the calculated (eAG), assumes that the RBC life span is the same for all patients. However, even modest variation in red cell survival—that would not be apparent in routine hematological studies—could have a significant impact on the HbA1c level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Thanks to this forum, I learned how to identify my trigger foods with the one hour/two hour BG test, and simply avoid them. My daily BG readings went from 150 down to 95-105 by avoiding my triggers

I don't understand how A1C readings taken 2,3,4 times year would have helped me identify trigger foods
 
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